Publication statistics

Pub. period:2003-2012
Pub. count:35
Number of co-authors:68



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gregory D. Abowd:21
Matthew S. Reynolds:8
Julie A. Kientz:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Shwetak N. Patel's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
Jun Rekimoto:60
 
 
 

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Shwetak N. Patel

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Publications by Shwetak N. Patel (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Choe, Eun Kyoung, Consolvo, Sunny, Jung, Jaeyeon, Harrison, Beverly, Patel, Shwetak N. and Kientz, Julie A. (2012): Investigating receptiveness to sensing and inference in the home using sensor proxies. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 61-70.

In-home sensing and inference systems impose privacy risks and social tensions, which can be substantial barriers for the wide adoption of these systems. To understand what might affect people's perceptions and acceptance of in-home sensing and inference systems, we conducted an empirical study with 22 participants from 11 households. The study included in-lab activities, four weeks using sensor proxies in situ, and exit interviews. We report on participants' perceived benefits and concerns of in-home sensing applications and the observed changes of their perceptions throughout the study. We also report on tensions amongst stakeholders around the adoption and use of such systems. We conclude with a discussion on how the ubicomp design space might be sensitized to people's perceived concerns and tensions regarding sensing and inference in the home.

© All rights reserved Choe et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cohn, Gabe, Gupta, Sidhant, Lee, Tien-Jui, Morris, Dan, Smith, Joshua R., Reynolds, Matthew S., Tan, Desney S. and Patel, Shwetak N. (2012): An ultra-low-power human body motion sensor using static electric field sensing. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 99-102.

Wearable sensor systems have been used in the ubiquitous computing community and elsewhere for applications such as activity and gesture recognition, health and wellness monitoring, and elder care. Although the power consumption of accelerometers has already been highly optimized, this work introduces a novel sensing approach which lowers the power requirement for motion sensing by orders of magnitude. We present an ultra-low-power method for passively sensing body motion using static electric fields by measuring the voltage at any single location on the body. We present the feasibility of using this sensing approach to infer the amount and type of body motion anywhere on the body and demonstrate an ultra-low-power motion detector used to wake up more power-hungry sensors. The sensing hardware consumes only 3.3 μW, and wake-up detection is done using an additional 3.3 μW (6.6 μW total).

© All rights reserved Cohn et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Larson, Eric C., Goel, Mayank, Boriello, Gaetano, Heltshe, Sonya, Rosenfeld, Margaret and Patel, Shwetak N. (2012): SpiroSmart: using a microphone to measure lung function on a mobile phone. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 280-289.

Home spirometry is gaining acceptance in the medical community because of its ability to detect pulmonary exacerbations and improve outcomes of chronic lung ailments. However, cost and usability are significant barriers to its widespread adoption. To this end, we present SpiroSmart, a low-cost mobile phone application that performs spirometry sensing using the built-in microphone. We evaluate SpiroSmart on 52 subjects, showing that the mean error when compared to a clinical spirometer is 5.1% for common measures of lung function. Finally, we show that pulmonologists can use SpiroSmart to diagnose varying degrees of obstructive lung ailments.

© All rights reserved Larson et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Cohn, Gabe, Morris, Daniel, Patel, Shwetak N. and Tan, Desney S. (2011): Your noise is my command: sensing gestures using the body as an antenna. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 791-800.

Touch sensing and computer vision have made human-computer interaction possible in environments where keyboards, mice, or other handheld implements are not available or desirable. However, the high cost of instrumenting environments limits the ubiquity of these technologies, particularly in home scenarios where cost constraints dominate installation decisions. Fortunately, home environments frequently offer a signal that is unique to locations and objects within the home: electromagnetic noise. In this work, we use the body as a receiving antenna and leverage this noise for gestural interaction. We demonstrate that it is possible to robustly recognize touched locations on an uninstrumented home wall using no specialized sensors. We conduct a series of experiments to explore the capabilities that this new sensing modality may offer. Specifically, we show robust classification of gestures such as the position of discrete touches around light switches, the particular light switch being touched, which appliances are touched, differentiation between hands, as well as continuous proximity of hand to the switch, among others. We close by discussing opportunities, limitations, and future work.

© All rights reserved Cohn et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Iannacci, Francis, Turnquist, Erik, Avrahami, Daniel and Patel, Shwetak N. (2011): The haptic laser: multi-sensation tactile feedback for at-a-distance physical space perception and interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2047-2050.

We present the Haptic Laser, a system for providing a range of tactile sensations to represent a physical environment at-a-distance. The Haptic Laser is a handheld device that simulates interaction with physical surfaces as a user targets objects of interest (e.g., a light switch, TV, etc). Using simple computer vision techniques for scene analysis and laser range finding for calculating distance, the Haptic Laser extracts information about the physical environment and conveys it haptically through a collection of hardware actuators. Pointing the Haptic Laser around a room, for example, presents the user with information about the presence of objects, transitions, and edges through touch rather than, or in addition to, vision. The Haptic Laser extends current work on haptic touch screens and pens, and is designed to allow for haptic feedback from a distance using multiple feedback channels.

© All rights reserved Iannacci et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Badshah, Akash, Gupta, Sidhant, Cohn, Gabe, Villar, Nicolas, Hodges, Steve and Patel, Shwetak N. (2011): Interactive generator: a self-powered haptic feedback device. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2051-2054.

We present Interactive Generator (InGen), a self-powered wireless rotary input device capable of generating haptic or force feedback without the need for any external power source. Our approach uses a modified servomotor to perform three functions: (1) generating power for wireless communication and embedded electronics, (2) sensing the direction and speed of rotation, and (3) providing force feedback during rotation. While InGen is rotating, the device is capable of providing the sensation of detents or bumps, changes in stiffness, and abrupt stops using only power that is harvested during interaction. We describe the device in detail, demonstrate an initial 'TV remote control' application, and end with a discussion of our experiences developing the prototype and application. To the best of our knowledge, InGen is the first self-powered device, which also provides haptic feedback during operation. More broadly, this work demonstrates a new class of input systems that uses human-generated power to provide feedback to the user and wirelessly communicate sensed information.

© All rights reserved Badshah et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Gupta, Sidhant, Chen, Ke-Yu, Reynolds, Matthew S. and Patel, Shwetak N. (2011): LightWave: using compact fluorescent lights as sensors. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 65-74.

In this paper, we describe LightWave, a sensing approach that turns ordinary compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs into sensors of human proximity. Unmodified CFL bulbs are shown to be sensitive proximity transducers when they are illuminated. This approach utilizes predictable variations in electromagnetic noise resulting from the change in impedance due to the proximity of a human body to the bulb. The electromagnetic noise can be sensed from any point along a home's electrical wiring. This allows users to perform gestures near any CFL lighting fixture, even when multiple lamps are operational. Gestures can be sensed using a single interface device plugged into any electrical outlet. We experimentally show that we can reliably detect hover gestures (waving a hand close to a lamp), touches on lampshades, and touches on the glass part of the bulb itself. Additionally, we show that touches anywhere along the body of a metal lamp can be detected. These basic detectable signals can then be combined to form complex gesture sequences for a variety of applications. We also show that CFLs can function as more general-purpose sensors for distributed human motion detection and ambient temperature sensing.

© All rights reserved Gupta et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Larson, Eric C., Lee, TienJui, Liu, Sean, Rosenfeld, Margaret and Patel, Shwetak N. (2011): Accurate and privacy preserving cough sensing using a low-cost microphone. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 375-384.

Audio-based cough detection has become more pervasive in recent years because of its utility in evaluating treatments and the potential to impact the quality of life for individuals with chronic cough. We critically examine the current state of the art in cough detection, concluding that existing approaches expose private audio recordings of users and bystanders. We present a novel algorithm for detecting coughs from the audio stream of a mobile phone. Our system allows cough sounds to be reconstructed from the feature set, but prevents speech from being reconstructed intelligibly. We evaluate our algorithm on data collected in the wild and report an average true positive

© All rights reserved Larson et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Gupta, Sidhant, Reynolds, Matthew S. and Patel, Shwetak N. (2010): ElectriSense: single-point sensing using EMI for electrical event detection and classification in the home. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 139-148.

This paper presents ElectriSense, a new solution for automatically detecting and classifying the use of electronic devices in a home from a single point of sensing. ElectriSense relies on the fact that most modern consumer electronics and fluorescent lighting employ switch mode power supplies (SMPS) to achieve high efficiency. These power supplies continuously generate high frequency electromagnetic interference (EMI) during operation that propagates throughout a home's power wiring. We show both analytically and by in-home experimentation that EMI signals are stable and predictable based on the device's switching frequency characteristics. Unlike past transient noise-based solutions, this new approach provides the ability for EMI signatures to be applicable across homes while still being able to differentiate between similar devices in a home. We have evaluated our solution in seven homes, including one six-month deployment. Our results show that ElectriSense can identify and classify the usage of individual devices with a mean accuracy of 93.82%.

© All rights reserved Gupta et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Cohn, Gabe, Stuntebeck, Erich, Pandey, Jagdish, Otis, Brian, Abowd, Gregory D. and Patel, Shwetak N. (2010): SNUPI: sensor nodes utilizing powerline infrastructure. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 159-168.

A persistent concern of wireless sensors is the power consumption required for communication, which presents a significant adoption hurdle for practical ubiquitous computing applications. This work explores the use of the home powerline as a large distributed antenna capable of receiving signals from ultra-low-power wireless sensor nodes and thus allowing nodes to be detected at ranges that are otherwise impractical with traditional over-the-air reception. We present the design and implementation of small ultra-low-power 27 MHz sensor nodes that transmit their data by coupling over the powerline to a single receiver attached to the powerline in the home. We demonstrate the ability of our general purpose wireless sensor nodes to provide whole-home coverage while consuming less than 1 mW of power when transmitting (65 W consumed in our custom CMOS transmitter). This is the lowest power transmitter to date compared to those found in traditional whole-home wireless systems.

© All rights reserved Cohn et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Campbell, Tim, Larson, Eric, Cohn, Gabe, Alcaide, Ramses and Patel, Shwetak N. (2010): WATTR: a method for self-powered wireless sensing of water activity in the home. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 169-172.

We present WATTR, a novel self-powered water activity sensor that utilizes residential water pressure impulses as both a powering and sensing source. Consisting of a power harvesting circuit, piezoelectric sensor, ultra-low-power 16-bit microcontroller, 16-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and a 433 MHz wireless transmitter, WATTR is capable of sampling home water pressure at 33 Hz and transmitting over 3 m when any water fixture in the home is opened or closed. WATTR provides an alternative sensing solution to the power intensive Bluetooth-based sensor used in the HydroSense project by Froehlich et al. [2] for single-point whole-home water usage. We demonstrate WATTR as a viable self-powered sensor capable of monitoring and transmitting water usage data without the use of a battery. Unlike other water-based power harvesters, WATTR does not waste water to power itself. We discuss the design, implementation, and experimental verification of the WATTR device.

© All rights reserved Campbell et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Gupta, Sidhant and Reynolds, Matthew S. (2010): The design and evaluation of an end-user-deployable, whole house, contactless power consumption sensor. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2471-2480.

We present the design, development, and evaluation of an end-user installable, whole house power consumption sensing system capable of gathering accurate real-time power use that does not require installing a current transformer around the electrical feeds in a home. Rather, our sensor system offers contactless operation by simply placing it on the outside of the breaker panel in a home. Although there are a number of existing commercial systems for gathering energy use in a home, almost none can easily and safely be installed by a homeowner (especially for homes in the U.S.). Our approach leverages advances in magnetoresistive materials and circuit design to allow contactless operation by reliably sensing the magnetic field induced by the 60 Hz current and a closed loop circuit allows us to precisely infer the power consumption in real-time. The contribution of this work is an enabling technology for researchers in the fields of Ubiquitous Computing and Human-Computer Interaction wanting to conduct practical large-scale deployments of end-user-deployable energy monitoring applications. We discuss the technical details, the iterative design, and end-user evaluations of our sensing approach.

© All rights reserved Patel et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Gupta, Sidhant, Campbell, Tim, Hightower, Jeffrey R. and Patel, Shwetak N. (2010): SqueezeBlock: using virtual springs in mobile devices for eyes-free interaction. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 101-104.

Haptic feedback provides an additional interaction channel when auditory and visual feedback may not be appropriate. We present a novel haptic feedback system that changes its elasticity to convey information for eyes-free interaction. SqueezeBlock is an electro-mechanical system that can realize a virtual spring having a programmatically controlled spring constant. It also allows for additional haptic modalities by altering the Hooke's Law linear-elastic force-displacement equation, such as non-linear springs, size changes, and spring length (range of motion) variations. This ability to program arbitrarily spring constants also allows for "click" and button-like feedback. We present several potential applications along with results from a study showing how well participants can distinguish between several levels of stiffness, size, and range of motion. We conclude with implications for interaction design.

© All rights reserved Gupta et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Wyche, Susan P., Caine, Kelly E., Davison, Benjamin K., Patel, Shwetak N., Arteaga, Michael and Grinter, Rebecca E. (2009): Sacred imagery in techno-spiritual design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 55-58.

Despite increased knowledge about how Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) are used to support religious and spiritual practices, designers know little about how to design technologies for faith-related purposes. Our research suggests incorporating sacred imagery into techno-spiritual applications can be useful in guiding development. We illustrate this through the design and evaluation of a mobile phone application developed to support Islamic prayer practices. Our contribution is to show how religious imagery can be used in the design of applications that go beyond the provision of functionality to connect people to the experience of religion.

© All rights reserved Wyche et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Huang, Elaine M., Yatani, Koji, Truong, Khai N., Kientz, Julie A. and Patel, Shwetak N. (2009): Understanding Mobile Phone Situated Sustainability: The Influence of Local Constraints and Practices on Transferability. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (1) pp. 46-53.

2008
 
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Kientz, Julie, Patel, Shwetak N., Jones, Brian, Price, Ed, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2008): The Georgia Tech aware home. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3675-3680.

The Aware Home Research Initiative (AHRI) at Georgia Tech is devoted to the multidisciplinary exploration of emerging technologies and services based in the home. Starting in 1998, our collection of faculty and students has created a unique research facility that allows us to simulate and evaluate user experiences with off-the-shelf and state-of-the-art technologies. With specific expertise in health, education, entertainment and usable security, we are able to apply our research to problems of significant social and economic impact.

© All rights reserved Kientz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kim, Sunyoung, Kientz, Julie A., Patel, Shwetak N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2008): Are you sleeping?: sharing portrayed sleeping status within a social network. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 619-628.

Within a group of peers, it is often useful or interesting to know whether someone in the group has gone to bed or whether they have awakened in the morning. This information, naturally integrated as a peripheral augmentation of an alarm clock, allows people to know whether it is appropriate to make a call or feel more connected with someone living remotely. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation of such an alarm clock, the BuddyClock, and describe how it enables users in a small social network to automatically share information about their sleeping behaviors with one another. Through 3-6 week deployment studies of this technology with five different social networks, we found that the alarm clock affected participant behaviors and allowed them to feel more connected to those with whom they shared their sleeping behaviors.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Yun, Jaeseok, Patel, Shwetak N., Reynolds, Matthew S. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2008): A quantitative investigation of inertial power harvesting for human-powered devices. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 74-83.

 
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Stuntebeck, Erich P., Patel, Shwetak N., Robertson, Thomas, Reynolds, Matthew S. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2008): Wideband powerline positioning for indoor localization. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 94-103.

 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Reynolds, Matthew S. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2008): Detecting Human Movement by Differential Air Pressure Sensing in HVAC System Ductwork: An Exploration in Infrastructure Mediated Sensing. In: Indulska, Jadwiga, Patterson, Donald J., Rodden, Tom and Ott, Max (eds.) Pervasive 2008 - Pervasive Computing, 6th International Conference May 19-22, 2008, Sydney, Australia. pp. 1-18.

2007
 
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Kientz, Julie, Arriaga, Rosa I., Chetty, Marshini, Hayes, Gillian R., Richardson, Jahmeilah, Patel, Shwetak N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2007): Grow and know: understanding record-keeping needs for tracking the development of young children. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1351-1360.

From birth through age five, children undergo rapid development and learn skills that will influence them their entire lives. Regular visits to the pediatrician and detailed record-keeping can ensure that children are progressing and can identify early warning signs of developmental delay or disability. However, new parents are often overwhelmed with new responsibilities, and we believe there is an opportunity for computing technology to assist in this process. In this paper, we present a qualitative study aimed at uncovering some specific needs for record-keeping and analysis for new parents and their network of caregivers. Through interviews and focus groups, we have confirmed assumptions about the rationales parents have and the functions required for using technology for record-keeping. We also identify new themes, potential prototypes, and design guidelines for this domain.

© All rights reserved Kientz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Patel, Shwetak N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2007): Blui: low-cost localized blowable user interfaces. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 7-10, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 217-220.

We describe a unique form of hands-free interaction that can be implemented on most commodity computing platforms. Our approach supports blowing at a laptop or computer screen to directly control certain interactive applications. Localization estimates are produced in real-time to determine where on the screen the person is blowing. Our approach relies solely on a single microphone, such as those already embedded in a standard laptop or one placed near a computer monitor, which makes our approach very cost-effective and easy-to-deploy. We show example interaction techniques that leverage this approach.

© All rights reserved Patel and Abowd and/or ACM Press

 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Robertson, Thomas, Kientz, Julie A., Reynolds, Matthew S. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2007): At the Flick of a Switch: Detecting and Classifying Unique Electrical Events on the Residential Power Line (Nominated for the Best Paper Award). In: Krumm, John, Abowd, Gregory D., Seneviratne, Aruna and Strang, Thomas (eds.) UbiComp 2007 Ubiquitous Computing - 9th International Conference September 16-19, 2007, Innsbruck, Austria. pp. 271-288.

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Poole, Erika Shehan, Iachello, Giovanni, Patel, Shwetak N., Grimes, Andrea, Abowd, Gregory D. and Truong, Khai N. (2007): Physical, Social, and Experiential Knowledge in Pervasive Computing Environments. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (4) pp. 56-63.

 
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Khler, Moritz, Patel, Shwetak N., Summet, Jay, Stuntebeck, Erich P. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2007): TrackSense: Infrastructure Free Precise Indoor Positioning Using Projected Patterns. In: LaMarca, Anthony, Langheinrich, Marc and Truong, Khai N. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2007 - Pervasive Computing 5th International Conference May 13-16, 2007, Toronto, Canada. pp. 334-350.

2006
 
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Kientz, Julie, Patel, Shwetak N., Tyebkhan, Arwa Z., Gane, Brian, Wiley, Jennifer and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): Where's my stuff?: design and evaluation of a mobile system for locating lost items for the visually impaired. In: Eighth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2006. pp. 103-110.

Finding lost items is a common problem for the visually impaired and is something that computing technology can help alleviate. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation of a mobile solution, called FETCH, for allowing the visually impaired to track and locate objects they lose frequently but for which they do not have a specific strategy for tracking. FETCH uses devices the user already owns, such as their cell phone or laptop, to locate objects around their house. Results from a focus group with visually impaired users informed the design of the system. We then studied the usability of a laptop solution in a laboratory study and studied the usability and usefulness of the system through a one-month deployment and diary study. These studies demonstrate that FETCH is usable and useful, but there is still room for improvement.

© All rights reserved Kientz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Kientz, Julie A., Hayes, Gillian R., Bhat, Sooraj and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): Farther Than You May Think: An Empirical Investigation of the Proximity of Users to Their Mobile Phones. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 123-140.

 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Truong, Khai N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): PowerLine Positioning: A Practical Sub-Room-Level Indoor Location System for Domestic Use. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 441-458.

 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Rekimoto, Jun and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): iCam: Precise at-a-Distance Interaction in the Physical Environment. In: Fishkin, Kenneth P., Schiele, Bernt, Nixon, Paddy and Quigley, Aaron J. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2006 - Pervasive Computing 4th International Conference May 7-10, 2006, Dublin, Ireland. pp. 272-287.

2005
 
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Truong, Khai N., Patel, Shwetak N., Summet, Jay and Abowd, Gregory D. (2005): Preventing Camera Recording by Designing a Capture-Resistant Environment. In: Beigl, Michael, Intille, Stephen S., Rekimoto, Jun and Tokuda, Hideyuki (eds.) UbiComp 2005 Ubiquitous Computing - 7th International Conference September 11-14, 2005, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 73-86.

 
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Abowd, Gregory D., Hayes, Gillian R., Iachello, Giovanni, Kientz, Julie A., Patel, Shwetak N., Stevens, Molly M. and Truong, Khai N. (2005): Prototypes and paratypes: designing mobile and ubiquitous computing applications. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (4) pp. 67-73.

2004
 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Pierce, Jeffrey S. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2004): A gesture-based authentication scheme for untrusted public terminals. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 157-160.

Powerful mobile devices with minimal I/O capabilities increase the likelihood that we will want to annex these devices to I/O resources we encounter in the local environment. This opportunistic annexing will require authentication. We present a sensor-based authentication mechanism for mobile devices that relies on physical possession instead of knowledge to setup the initial connection to a public terminal. Our solution provides a simple mechanism for shaking a device to authenticate with the public infrastructure, making few assumptions about the surrounding infrastructure while also maintaining a reasonable level of security.

© All rights reserved Patel et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Patel, Shwetak N., Truong, Khai N., Iachello, Giovanni, Kientz, Julie A., Farmer, Rob and Abowd, Gregory D. (2004): The Personal Audio Loop: Designing a Ubiquitous Audio-Based Memory Aid. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 168-179.

 
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Patel, Shwetak N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2004): The ContextCam: Automated Point of Capture Video Annotation. In: Davies, Nigel, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Siio, Itiro (eds.) UbiComp 2004 Ubiquitous Computing 6th International Conference September 7-10, 2004, Nottingham, UK. pp. 301-318.

2003
 
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Patel, Shwetak N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2003): A 2-Way Laser-Assisted Selection Scheme for Handhelds in a Physical Environment. In: Dey, Anind K., Schmidt, Albrecht and McCarthy, Joseph F. (eds.) UbiComp 2003 Ubiquitous Computing - 5th International Conference October 12-15, 2003, Seattle, WA, USA. pp. 200-207.

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/shwetak_n__patel.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2003-2012
Pub. count:35
Number of co-authors:68



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gregory D. Abowd:21
Matthew S. Reynolds:8
Julie A. Kientz:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Shwetak N. Patel's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
Jun Rekimoto:60
 
 
 

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