Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-2001
Pub. count:14
Number of co-authors:25



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Steve Harrison:8
John C. Tang:3
William van Melle:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Scott Minneman's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Thomas P. Moran:66
Gordon Kurtenbach:45
Austin Henderson:39
 
 
 
Jul 26

The display is the computer.

-- Jen-Hsun Huang, 2002

 
 

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Scott Minneman

Has also published under the name of:
"S. Minneman"

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Publications by Scott Minneman (bibliography)

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2001
 
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Back, Maribeth, Cohen, Jonathan, Gold, Rich, Harrison, Steve and Minneman, Scott (2001): Listen Reader: An Electronically Augmented Paper-Based Book. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 23-29.

While predictions abound that electronic books will supplant traditional paper-based books, many people bemoan the coming loss of the book as cultural artifact. In this project we deliberately keep the affordances of paper books while adding electronic augmentation. The Listen Reader combines the look and feel of a real book - a beautiful binding, paper pages and printed images and text - with the rich, evocative quality of a movie soundtrack. The book's multi-layered interactive soundtrack consists of music and sound effects. Electric field sensors located in the book binding sense the proximity of the reader's hands and control audio parameters, while RFID tags embedded in each page allow fast, robust page identification. Three different Listen Readers were built as part of a six-month museum exhibit, with more than 350,000 visitors. This paper discusses design, implementation, and lessons learned through the iterative design process, observation, and visitor interviews.

© All rights reserved Back et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Harrison, Steve, Minneman, Scott, Back, Maribeth, Balsamo, Anne, Chow, Mark, Gold, Rich, Gorbet, Matt, Donald, Dale Mac, Ehrlich, Kate and Henderson, Austin (2001): Design: the what of XFR: eXperiments in the future of reading. In Interactions, 8 (3) pp. 21-30.

 
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Harrison, Steve, Minneman, Scott and Balsamo, Anne (2001): Methods & tools: how to XFR: "eXperiments in the future of reading". In Interactions, 8 (3) pp. 31-41.

1999
 
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Minneman, Scott and Harrison, Steve (1999): The DrawStream station: a tool for distributed and asynchronous chats about sketches and artifacts. In: 1999. pp. 221-225.

1998
 
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Meyer, Jon, Glassner, Andrew, Minneman, Scott, Naimark, Michael and Staples, Loretta (1998): Artists and Technologists Working Together. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 67-69.

This panel explores the dialog and interplay between artists and technologists. In the process, the panelists aim to bring considerations of art and the artistic process to the attention of the technology-oriented UIST community. We invite readers to think about how your work relates to art. We encourage the research community to look for ways to integrate art and artists within their own programs, for example, by starting artist-in-residence activities, introducing courses on art and design into CS curricula, or inviting artists to participate in projects.

© All rights reserved Meyer et al. and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Moran, Thomas P., Palen, Leysia, Harrison, Steve, Chiu, Patrick, Kimberg, Daniel Y., Minneman, Scott, Melle, William van and Zellweger, Polle T. (1997): "I'll Get That Off the Audio": A Case Study of Salvaging Multimedia Meeting Records. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 202-209.

We describe a case study of a complex, ongoing, collaborative work process, where the central activity is a series of meetings reviewing a wide range of subtle technical topics. The problem is the accurate reporting of the results of these meetings, which is the responsibility of a single person, who is not well-versed in all the topics. We provided tools to capture the meeting discussions and tools to "salvage" the captured multimedia recordings. Salvaging is a new kind of activity involving replaying, extracting, organizing, and writing. We observed a year of mature salvaging work in the case study. From this we describe the nature of salvage work (the constituent activities, the use of the workspace, the affordances of the audio medium, how practices develop and differentiate, how the content material affects practice). We also demonstrate how this work relates to the larger work processes (the task demands of the setting, the interplay of salvage with capture, the influence on the people being reported on and reported to). Salvaging tools are shown to be valuable for dealing with free-flowing discussions of complex subject matter and for producing high quality documentation.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Moran, Thomas P., Chiu, Patrick, Harrison, Steve, Kurtenbach, Gordon, Minneman, Scott and Melle, William van (1996): Evolutionary Engagement in an Ongoing Collaborative Work Process: A Case Study. In: Olson, Gary M., Olson, Judith S. and Ackerman, Mark S. (eds.) Proceedings of the 1996 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 1996, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. pp. 150-159.

We describe a case study in which experimental collaboration technologies was used for over two years in the real, ongoing work process of intellectual property management (IPM) at Xerox PARC. The technologies include LiveBoard-based meeting support tools, laptop notetaking tools, digital audio recording, and workstation tools to later access and replay the meeting activities. In cooperation with the IPM manager, both the work process and the tools were continuously evolved to improve the process. We supported and observed over 60 meetings, leading to a rich set of empirical observations of the meeting activities. We note some practical lessons for this research approach.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

1991
 
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Minneman, Scott and Bly, Sara A. (1991): Managing a trois: A Study of a Multi-User Drawing Tool in Distributed Design Work. In: Robertson, Scott P., Olson, Gary M. and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 91 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 28 - June 5, 1991, New Orleans, Louisiana. pp. 217-224.

A multi-user drawing tool was used by participants in a distributed design exercise conducted in a multi-media working environment. The goal of the study was to explore how observations from our earlier studies of shared drawing in two-person design activity would hold up when three participants worked together. Additionally, the study provided opportunities to contrast video/audio connections with audio-only connections and to discover new behaviors that emerge in the use of new technologies. Participants successfully used the shared drawing system with no observed difficulties attributable to the addition of a third user. Audio-only connections appeared to adequately support this work activity, but details of the participants' interactions in the exercise raised questions that deserve further study. Finally, observations suggest that drawing tools such as the one reported here may offer support for alternative forms of participation in collaborative work.

© All rights reserved Minneman and and/or ACM Press

 
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Tang, John C. and Minneman, Scott (1991): VideoWhiteboard: Video Shadows to Support Remote Collaboration. In: Robertson, Scott P., Olson, Gary M. and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 91 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 28 - June 5, 1991, New Orleans, Louisiana. pp. 315-322.

VideoWhiteboard is a prototype tool to support remote shared drawing activity. It provides a whiteboard-sized shared drawing space for collaborators who are located in remote sites. It allows each user to see the drawings and a shadow of the gestures of collaborators at the remote site. The development of VideoWhiteboard is based on empirical studies of collaborative drawing activity, including experiences in using the VideoDraw shared drawing prototype. VideoWhiteboard, enables remote collaborators to work together much as if they were sharing a whiteboard, and in some ways allows them to work together even more closely than if they were in the same room.

© All rights reserved Tang and Minneman and/or ACM Press

 
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Tang, John C. and Minneman, Scott (1991): VideoDraw: A Video Interface for Collaborative Drawing. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 9 (2) pp. 170-184.

This paper describes VideoDraw, a shared drawing tool, and the process by which it is being designed and developed. VideoDraw is a video-based prototype tool that provides a shared "virtual sketchbook" among two or more collaborators. It not only allows the collaborators to see each others' drawings, but also conveys the accompanying hand gestures and the process of creating and using those drawings. Its design stems from studying how people collaborate using shared drawing spaces. Design implications raised by those studies were embodied in a prototype, which was subsequently observed in use situations. Further research studying the use of VideoDraw (in comparison with other collaborative media) will lead to a better understanding of collaborative drawing activity and inform the continued technical development of tools to support collaborative drawing.

© All rights reserved Tang and Minneman and/or ACM Press

1990
 
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Tang, John C. and Minneman, Scott (1990): VideoDraw: A Video Interface for Collaborative Drawing. In: Carrasco, Jane and Whiteside, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 90 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference 1990, Seattle, Washington,USA. pp. 313-320.

This paper describes VideoDraw, a shared drawing tool, and the process by which it is being designed and developed. VideoDraw is a prototype, videobased, tool that provides a shared "virtual sketchbook" among two or more collaborators. It not only allows the collaborators to see each others' drawings, but also conveys the accompanying hand gestures and the process of creating and using those drawings. Its design stems from studying how people collaborate using shared drawing spaces. Design implications raised by those studies were embodied in a prototype, which was in turn observed in use situations. Continued research studying the use of VideoDraw (in comparison with other collaborative media) will lead to a better understanding of collaborative drawing activity and inform the continued technical development of VideoDraw.

© All rights reserved Tang and Minneman and/or ACM Press

 
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Bly, Sara A. and Minneman, Scott (1990): Commune: A Shared Drawing Surface. In: Lochovsky, Frederick H. and Allen, Robert (eds.) Proceedings of the Conference on Office Information Systems 1990 April 25-27, 1990, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. pp. 184-192.

Careful observation of small-group design sessions suggests that the process of creating, referring to, and using drawings may be as important to the design process as the drawings themselves. Based on studies of the uses of drawing spaces, Commune was developed to allow designers working remotely to share a drawing surface and to engage in many of the interactions available in conventional face-to-face situations. The design of Commune makes marks and 2-dimensional cursor gestures visible simultaneously to all users, allows rapid transitions among drawing, writing, and gesturing, and provides a shared space with actions from multiple users occurring simultaneously. These capabilities support natural uses of the drawing surface during the interaction: the ability to interact on each other's marks, to emphasize talk with marks and gestures, to reference previous illustrations and concepts, and to interweave talk and drawing actions fluidly.

© All rights reserved Bly and Minneman and/or ACM Press

 
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Harrison, Steve, Minneman, Scott, Stults, Bob and Weber, Karon (1990): Video: A Design Medium. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 21 (3) pp. 86-90.

1989
 
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Harrison, Steve, Minneman, Scott, Stults, Bob and Weber, Karon (1989): Video: A Design Medium. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 21 (2) pp. 62-66.

 
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Changes to this page (author)

29 Jun 2007: Added
23 Jun 2007: Modified
23 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/scott_minneman.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-2001
Pub. count:14
Number of co-authors:25



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Steve Harrison:8
John C. Tang:3
William van Melle:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Scott Minneman's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Thomas P. Moran:66
Gordon Kurtenbach:45
Austin Henderson:39
 
 
 
Jul 26

The display is the computer.

-- Jen-Hsun Huang, 2002

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!