Publication statistics

Pub. period:1996-2011
Pub. count:53
Number of co-authors:59



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Veikko Surakka:11
Jukka Raisamo:11
Tatiana Evreinova:9

 

 

Productive colleagues

Roope Raisamo's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Stephen A. Brewste..:108
Veikko Surakka:28
Poika Isokoski:24
 
 
 

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Roope Raisamo

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Publications by Roope Raisamo (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Lylykangas, Jani, Surakka, Veikko, Salminen, Katri, Raisamo, Jukka, Laitinen, Pauli, Ronning, Kasper and Raisamo, Roope (2011): Designing tactile feedback for piezo buttons. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3281-3284. Available online

The present aim was to study the preference of tactile feedback stimulations given by non-physical (i.e., solid) piezo-actuated buttons. Participants (n=16) ranked 16 different tactile feedback stimuli varied by 4 output delays and 4 vibration durations. The results showed that the mean ranks of the stimuli differed significantly from each other. The timing parameters of delay and duration interacted with each other, for example, so that preference of certain vibration duration fluctuated in response to different output delays. Using a very short time window (i.e., 10-453 ms) combining both delay and duration parameters of the feedback could result either in favorable or significantly less favorable subjective experience. The results suggest that a preferred perception of tactile feedback from non-physical buttons requires careful design and controlling of the timing parameters.

© All rights reserved Lylykangas et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hoggan, Eve, Trendafilov, Dari, Ahmaniemi, Teemu and Raisamo, Roope (2011): Squeeze vs. tilt: a comparative study using continuous tactile feedback. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1309-1314. Available online

This paper presents an investigation into the performance of squeezing as a manipulative interaction technique in comparison to tilting with an aim to answer two questions: is squeezing an effective input technique for mobile devices and can tactile feedback improve performance? The experiment results show that both input methods are viable but squeezing is significantly faster and more sustainable than tilting (with and without tactile feedback).

© All rights reserved Hoggan et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Salminen, Katri, Surakka, Veikko, Raisamo, Jukka, Lylykangas, Jani, Pystynen, Johannes, Raisamo, Roope, Mkel, Kalle and Ahmaniemi, Teemu (2011): Emotional responses to thermal stimuli. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2011. pp. 193-196. Available online

The present aim was to study if thermal stimuli presented to the palm can affect emotional responses when measured with emotion related subjective rating scales and changes in skin conductance response (SCR). Two target temperatures, cold and warm, were created by either decreasing or increasing the temperature of the stimulus 4 C in respect to the participants current hand temperature. Both cold and warm stimuli were presented by using two presentation methods, i.e., dynamic and pre-adjusted. The results showed that both the dynamic and pre-adjusted warm stimuli elevated the ratings of arousal and dominance. In addition, the pre-adjusted warm and cold stimuli elevated the SCR. The results suggest that especially pre-adjusted warm stimuli can be seen as effective in activating the autonomic nervous system and arousal and dominance dimensions of the affective rating space.

© All rights reserved Salminen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Heikkinen, Jani, Rantala, Jussi, Olsson, Thomas, Raisamo, Roope and Surakka, Veikko (2011): Exploring the effects of cumulative contextual cues on interpreting vibrotactile messages. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 1-10. Available online

The sense of touch has been shown to convey emotive information and nuances in face-to-face interpersonal communication, but its applications in mobile communication technologies are still limited. One of the challenges for such new communication medium is the interpretation of tactile messages. This paper presents a study with an early prototype of a mobile tactile device. Twenty novice participants interpreted four messages consisting of a four-channel vibrotactile stimulus, complemented with three cumulative textual cues regarding 1) the communication setting, 2) sender, and 3) situation. The subjective interpretations were assessed with four semantic differential scales, and the reasoning behind the interpretations was inquired by interviewing. The findings show that the intensity and, to some degree, the friendliness of the message could be identified from the tactile-only message. However, to correctly interpret the degree of formality or emotionality in the message, also contextual cues were needed.

© All rights reserved Heikkinen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Turunen, Markku, Hella, Juho, Miettinen, Toni, Valkama, Pellervo, Hakulinen, Jaakko and Raisamo, Roope (2011): Multimodal multi-device program guide for smart conferences. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 679-682. Available online

We demonstrate a multimodal, multi-user, and multi-device conference program guide for conference participants. Its functionality includes access to the conference program with additional multimedia content, voting, feedback, and communication with the other participants. People can interact with the system in a multimodal way using spoken language, gestures and haptic feedback with mobile phones and shared public displays.

© All rights reserved Turunen et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Pakkanen, Toni, Raisamo, Roope, Salminen, Katri and Surakka, Veikko (2010): Haptic numbers: three haptic representation models for numbers on a touch screen phone. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2010. p. 35. Available online

Systematic research on haptic stimuli is needed to create viable haptic feeling for user interface elements. There has been a lot of research with haptic user interface prototypes, but much less with haptic stimulus design. In this study we compared three haptic representation models with two representation rates for the numbers used in the phone number keypad layout. Haptic representations for the numbers were derived from Arabic and Roman numbers, and from the Location of the number button in the layout grid. Using a Nokia 5800 Express Music phone participants entered phone numbers blindly in the phone. The speed, error rate, and subjective experiences were recorded. The results showed that the model had no effect to the measured performance, but subjective experiences were affected. The Arabic numbers with slower speed were preferred most. Thus, subjectively the performance was rated as better, even though objective measures showed no differences.

© All rights reserved Pakkanen et al. and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Lylykangas, Jani, Surakka, Veikko, Rantala, Jussi, Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope and Tuulari, Esa (2009): Vibrotactile information for intuitive speed regulation. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 112-119. Available online

The present aim was to investigate if controlled vibrotactile stimulation can be used to inform users on how to regulate their behavior. 36 stimuli were varied by frequency modulation (i.e., ascending, constant, and descending), duration (i.e., 500, 1750, and 3000 ms), waveform (i.e., sine and sawtooth), and body location (i.e., wrist and chest), and presented to 12 participants. The participants were to evaluate without any training the meaning of each presented stimuli using three response options: 'accelerate your speed', 'keep your speed constant', and 'decelerate your speed'. Participants rated also how emotionally pleasant and arousing the different stimulations were. The results showed that the stimuli were predominantly perceived analogously with the vibration frequency modulation. The best stimuli represented 'accelerate your speed', 'keep your speed constant', and 'decelerate your speed' information in

© All rights reserved Lylykangas et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Heikkinen, Jani, Rantala, Jussi, Olsson, Thomas, Raisamo, Roope, Lylykangas, Jani, Raisamo, Jukka, Surakka, Veikko and Ahmaniemi, Teemu Tuomas (2009): Enhancing personal communication with spatial haptics: Two scenario-based experiments on gestural interaction. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 20 (5) pp. 287-304. Available online

 
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Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope and Surakka, Veikko (2009): Evaluating the effect of temporal parameters for vibrotactile saltatory patterns. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2009. pp. 319-326. Available online

Cutaneous saltation provides interesting possibilities for applications. An illusion of vibrotactile mediolateral movement was elicited to a left dorsal forearm to investigate emotional (i.e., pleasantness) and cognitive (i.e., continuity) experiences to vibrotactile stimulation. Twelve participants were presented with nine saltatory stimuli delivered to a linearly aligned row of three vibrotactile actuators separated by 70 mm in distance. The stimuli were composed of three temporal parameters of 12, 24 and 48 ms for both burst duration and inter-burst interval to form all nine possible uniform pairs. First, the stimuli were ranked by the participants using a special three-step procedure. Second, the participants rated the stimuli using two nine-point bipolar scales measuring the pleasantness and continuity of each stimulus, separately. The results showed especially the interval between two successive bursts was a significant factor for saltation. Moreover, the temporal parameters seemed to affect more the experienced continuity of the stimuli compared to pleasantness. These findings encourage us to continue to further study the saltation and the effect of different parameters for subjective experience.

© All rights reserved Raisamo et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hoggan, Eve, Raisamo, Roope and Brewster, Stephen A. (2009): Mapping information to audio and tactile icons. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2009. pp. 327-334. Available online

We report the results of a study focusing on the meanings that can be conveyed by audio and tactile icons. Our research considers the following question: how can audio and tactile icons be designed to optimise congruence between crossmodal feedback and the type of information this feedback is intended to convey? For example, if we have a set of system warnings, confirmations, progress up-dates and errors: what audio and tactile representations best match the information or type of message? Is one modality more appropriate at presenting certain types of information than the other modality? The results of this study indicate that certain parameters of the audio and tactile modalities such as rhythm, texture and tempo play an important role in the creation of congruent sets of feedback when given a specific type of information to transmit. We argue that a combination of audio or tactile parameters derived from our results allows the same type of information to be derived through touch and sound with an intuitive match to the content of the message.

© All rights reserved Hoggan et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Raisamo, Roope and Jansson, G. (2009): Haptic Interaction. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.). "The Universal Access Handbook". Boca Ration, USA: Taylor and Francispp. 33-1-33-16

 Cited in the following chapter:

Design 4 All: [/encyclopedia/design_4_all.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Design 4 All: [/encyclopedia/design_4_all.html]


 
2008
 
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Salminen, Katri, Surakka, Veikko, Lylykangas, Jani, Raisamo, Jukka, Saarinen, Rami, Raisamo, Roope, Rantala, Jussi and Evreinov, Grigori (2008): Emotional and behavioral responses to haptic stimulation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1555-1562. Available online

A prototype of friction-based horizontally rotating fingertip stimulator was used to investigate emotional experiences and behavioral responses to haptic stimulation. The rotation style of 12 different stimuli was varied by burst length (i.e., 20, 50, 100 ms), continuity (i.e., continuous and discontinuous), and direction (e.g., forward and backward). Using these stimuli 528 stimulus pairs were presented to 12 subjects who were to distinguish if stimuli in each pair were the same or different. Then they rated the stimuli using four scales measuring the pleasantness, arousal, approachability, and dominance qualities of the 12 stimuli. The results showed that continuous forward-backward rotating stimuli were rated as significantly more unpleasant, arousing, avoidable, and dominating than other types of stimulations (e.g., discontinuous forward rotation). The reaction times to these stimuli were significantly faster than reaction times to discontinuous forward and backward rotating stimuli. The results clearly suggest that even simple haptic stimulation can carry emotional information. The results can be utilized when making use of haptics in human-technology interaction.

© All rights reserved Salminen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pakkanen, Toni, Lylykangas, Jani, Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope, Salminen, Katri, Rantala, Jussi and Surakka, Veikko (2008): Perception of low-amplitude haptic stimuli when biking. In: Digalakis, Vassilios, Potamianos, Alexandros, Turk, Matthew, Pieraccini, Roberto and Ivanov, Yuri (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2008 October 20-22, 2008, Chania, Crete, Greece. pp. 281-284. Available online

 
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Evreinova, Tatiana V., Evreinov, Grigori and Raisamo, Roope (2008): Non-visual game design and training in gameplay skill acquisition -- A puzzle game case study. In Interacting with Computers, 20 (3) pp. 386-405. Available online

This paper reports the results of a study on the design and evaluation of the game and techniques which allow puzzles to be played in the absence of visual feedback. We have demonstrated that a camera-mouse can be used successfully for blind navigation and target location acquisition within a game field. To gradually teach the players the sequential learning method was applied. Blind exploration of the gamespace was augmented with sticky labels and overview sound cues, verbal and non-verbal, which can significantly reduce the cognitive load and facilitate mental matching and integration. The full-sticky labels technique does not require fine motor skills and allows a user to gain control over the game with a minimum level of skills. With the vertical sticky labels technique training was focused on the development of accurate head movements only on a horizontal plane. With practice, the players can use the non-sticky labels technique. After 240 trials (3-4 h), the cumulative experience of the blindfolded players was increased 22.5-27 times compared to the initial 10 trials.

© All rights reserved Evreinova et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Toyssy, Sampo, Raisamo, Jukka and Raisamo, Roope (2008): Telling Time by Vibration. In: Ferre, Manuel (ed.) EuroHaptics 2008 - Haptics Perception, Devices and Scenarios - 6th International Conference June 10-13, 2008, Madrid, Spain. pp. 924-929. Available online

 
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Tanhua-Piiroinen, Erika, Pasto, Virpi, Raisamo, Roope and Sallns, Eva-Lotta (2008): Supporting Collaboration between Visually Impaired and Sighted Children in a Multimodal Learning Environment. In: Pirhonen, Antti and Brewster, Stephen A. (eds.) HAID 2008 - Haptic and Audio Interaction Design - Third International Workshop September 15-16, 2008, Jyvskyl, Finland. pp. 11-20. Available online

 
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Jokiniemi, Maria, Raisamo, Roope, Lylykangas, Jani and Surakka, Veikko (2008): Crossmodal Rhythm Perception. In: Pirhonen, Antti and Brewster, Stephen A. (eds.) HAID 2008 - Haptic and Audio Interaction Design - Third International Workshop September 15-16, 2008, Jyvskyl, Finland. pp. 111-119. Available online

 
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Evreinova, Tatiana, Evreinov, Grigori, Raisamo, Roope and Vesterinen, Leena (2008): Non-visual interaction with graphs assisted with directional-predictive sounds and vibrations: a comparative study. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 7 (1) pp. 93-102. Available online

Blind and visually impaired students need special educational and developmental tools to allow them to interact with graphic entities on PDA and desktop platforms. In previous research, stylus movements regarding the hidden graph were sonified with three directional-predictive sound (DPS) signals, taking into account an exploration behavior and the concept of the capture radius. The results indicated that the scanpaths were by 24-40% shorter in

© All rights reserved Evreinova et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Evreinova, Tatiana, Evreinov, Grigori and Raisamo, Roope (2008): A camera-joystick for sound-augmented non-visual navigation and target acquisition: a case study. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 7 (3) pp. 129-144. Available online

This paper presents the results of a comparative study of user input with a camera-joystick and a manual joystick used in a target acquisition task when neither targets nor pointer could be perceived visually. The camera-joystick is an input technique in which each on-screen item is accessible from the center with a predefined vector of head motion. Absolute pointing was implemented with an acceleration factor of 1.7 and a moving average on 5 detected head positions. The underlying assumption was that, in order to provide a robust input for blind users, the interaction technique has to be based on perceptually well-discriminated human movements, which compose a basic framework of an accessible virtual workspace demanding minimum external auxiliary cues. The target spots, having a diameter of 35mm and a distance between the centers of adjacent spots of 60 mm, were arranged in a rectangular grid of 5 rows by 5 columns. The targets were captured from a distance of 600mm. The results have shown that the camera input is a promising technique for non-visual human-computer interaction. The subjects demonstrated, more than twice, better performance in the target acquisition task with the camera-joystick versus the manual joystick. All the participants reported that the camera-joystick was a robust and preferable input technique when visual information was not available. Blind interaction techniques could be significantly further improved allowing a user-dependent activation of the navigational cues to better coordinate feedbacks with exploratory behavior.

© All rights reserved Evreinova et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Evreinova, Tatiana, Evreinov, Grigori E. and Raisamo, Roope (2008): Non-visual Gameplay: Making Board Games Easy and Fun. In: Miesenberger, Klaus, Klaus, Joachim, Zagler, Wolfgang L. and Karshmer, Arthur I. (eds.) ICCHP 2008 - Computers Helping People with Special Needs - 11th International Conference July 9-11, 2008, Linz, Austria. pp. 561-568. Available online

 
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Evreinova, Tatiana, Evreinov, Grigori, Raisamo, Roope and Vesterinen, Leena (2008): Non-visual interaction with graphs assisted with directional-predictive sounds and vibrations: a comparative study. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 7 (1) pp. 93-102. Available online

Blind and visually impaired students need special educational and developmental tools to allow them to interact with graphic entities on PDA and desktop platforms. In previous research, stylus movements regarding the hidden graph were sonified with three directional-predictive sound (DPS) signals, taking into account an exploration behavior and the concept of the capture radius. The results indicated that the scanpaths were by 24-40% shorter in

© All rights reserved Evreinova et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Pakkanen, Toni, Lylykangas, Jani, Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope, Salminen, Katri, Rantala, Jussi and Surakka, Veikko (2008): Perception of low-amplitude haptic stimuli when biking. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2008. pp. 281-284. Available online

Haptic stimulation in motion has been studied only little earlier. To provide guidance for designing haptic interfaces for mobile use we carried out an initial experiment using C-2 actuators. 16 participants attended in the experiment to find out whether there is a difference in perceiving low-amplitude vibrotactile stimuli when exposed to minimal and moderate physical exertion. A stationary bike was used to control the exertion. Four body locations (wrist, leg, chest and back), two stimulus durations (1000 ms and 2000 ms) and two motion conditions with the stationary bicycle (still and moderate pedaling) were applied. It was found that cycling had significant effect on both the perception accuracy and the reaction times with selected stimuli. Stimulus amplitudes used in this experiment can be used to help haptic design for mobile users.

© All rights reserved Pakkanen et al. and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Raisamo, Roope, Patomki, Saija, Hasu, Matias and Pasto, Virpi (2007): Design and evaluation of a tactile memory game for visually impaired children. In Interacting with Computers, 19 (2) pp. 196-205. Available online

Visually impaired people have a lack of proper user interfaces to allow them to easily make use of modern technology. This problem may be solved with multimodal user interfaces that should be designed taking into account the type and degree of disability. The purpose of the study presented in this article was to create usable games for visually impaired children making use of low-cost vibro-tactile devices in multimodal applications. A tactile memory game using multimodal navigation support with high-contrast visual feedback and audio cues was implemented. The game was designed to be played with a tactile gamepad. Different vibrations were to be remembered instead of sounds or embossed pictures that are common in memory games for blind children. The usability and playability of the game was tested with a group of seven 12-13-year-old visually impaired children. The results showed that the game design was successful and a tactile gamepad was usable. The game got a positive response from the focus group.

© All rights reserved Raisamo et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Isokoski, Poika, Raisamo, Roope and Evreinov, Grigori (2007): User performance with trackball-mice. In Interacting with Computers, 19 (3) pp. 407-427. Available online

Abstract Trackball-mice are devices that include both a trackball and a mouse. In this paper we discuss our experiences in building and testing trackball-mouse prototypes. We report four experiments on user performance with the prototypes used as trackball-mice, conventional mice, and in two-handed configuration with a separate trackball for the non-dominant hand. The results show that user performance with the two-handed configuration was better than in one-handed operation of a trackball-mouse and in one-handed operation of a mouse. Trackball-mouse use and conventional mouse use were more evenly matched. However, Trackball-mouse operation involves a skill that most users do not have whereas mouse operation is familiar to most. Therefore, widespread introduction of trackball-mice does not appear to be justified on performance grounds alone. However, trackball-mice can be used as regular mice by ignoring the ball. This makes them compatible with traditional graphical user interfaces while offering two extra degrees of freedom in tasks where they are beneficial.

© All rights reserved Isokoski et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Pietrzak, Thomas, Pecci, Isabelle, Saarinen, Rami, Raisamo, Roope and Jrvi, Jane (2007): The MICOLE Architecture: Multimodal Support for Inclusion of Visually Impaired Children. In: Ninth International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces ICMI 07 12-15 November, 2007, Nagoya, Japan. pp. 193-200.

Modern information technology allows us to seek out new ways to support the computer use and communication of disabled people. With the aid of new interaction technologies and techniques visually impaired and sighted users can collaborate, for example, in the classroom situations. The main goal of the MICOLE project was to create a software architecture that makes it easier for the developers to create multimodal multi-user applications. The framework is based on interconnected software agents. The hardware used in this study includes VTPlayer Mouse which has two built-in Braille displays, and several haptic devices such as PHANToM Omni, PHANToM Desktop and PHANToM Premium. We also used the SpaceMouse and various audio setups in the applications. In this paper we present a software architecture, a set of software agents, and an example of using the architecture. The example application shown is an electric circuit application that follows the single-user with many devices scenario. The application uses a PHANToM and a VTPlayer Mouse together with visual and audio feedback to make the electric circuits understandable through touch.

© All rights reserved Pietrzak et al. and/or ACM

 
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Evreinova, Tatiana, Evreinov, Grigori E. and Raisamo, Roope (2007): Camera based head-mouse - optimization of template-based cross-correlation matching. In: Ranchordas, Alpesh, Arajo, Helder and Vitri, Jordi (eds.) VISAPP 2007 - Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Computer Vision Theory and Applications - Volume 2 March 8-11, 2007, Barcelona, Spain. pp. 507-514.

 
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Pietrzak, Thomas, Martin, Benot, Pecci, Isabelle, Saarinen, Rami, Raisamo, Roope and Jrvi, Janne (2007): The micole architecture: multimodal support for inclusion of visually impaired children. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2007. pp. 193-200. Available online

Modern information technology allows us to seek out new ways to support the computer use and communication of disabled people. With the aid of new interaction technologies and techniques visually impaired and sighted users can collaborate, for example, in the classroom situations. The main goal of the MICOLE project was to create a software architecture that makes it easier for the developers to create multimodal multi-user applications. The framework is based on interconnected software agents. The hardware used in this study includes VTPlayer Mouse which has two built-in Braille displays, and several haptic devices such as PHANToM Omni, PHANToM Desktop and PHANToM Premium. We also used the SpaceMouse and various audio setups in the applications. In this paper we present a software architecture, a set of software agents, and an example of using the architecture. The example application shown is an electric circuit application that follows the single-user with many devices scenario. The application uses a PHANToM and a VTPlayer Mouse together with visual and audio feedback to make the electric circuits understandable through touch.

© All rights reserved Pietrzak et al. and/or their publisher

2006
 
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Evreinova, Tatiana G., Evreinov, Grigori and Raisamo, Roope (2006): An alternative approach to strengthening tactile memory for sensory disabled people. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 5 (2) pp. 189-198. Available online

Deaf and hearing-impaired people need special educational and developmental tools to support their social inclusion. Research in vibro-tactile pattern perception has shown that tactile memory could be a crucial aspect in coding and imaging semantic information for users with sensory limitations. This paper describes a simple matching game designed to facilitate the learning process of 27 vibro-tactile composite patterns (tactons) which can be produced with the Logitech tactile feedback mouse. The underlying assumption was that a particular framework and game intrigue would induce a player to mobilize the perceptive skills and deploy individual playing tactics to recall the tactons when progressing through the game. The performance of ten subjects using soundproof headphones was investigated in terms of the number of repetitions required to memorize and learn the mono-frequency, bi-frequency and three-frequency tactons, and in terms of the selection time needed to match the tactons in the game script. The analysis of the data collected indicated that the novice-to-expert transition was significantly above chance when the results obtained in the first and the last test sessions were statistically analyzed and compared. There was also a significant difference between mean selection times needed to match the composite patterns depending of their complexity in the first and the last test sessions. Upon learning and training within game, the tactons may be employed to assign alphabet characters or symbols to communicate textual or symbolic information.

© All rights reserved Evreinova et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Evreinova, Tatiana, Evreinov, Grigori E. and Raisamo, Roope (2006): Evaluating the Length of Virtual Horizontal Bar Chart Columns Augmented with Wrench and Sound Feedback. In: Miesenberger, Klaus, Klaus, Joachim, Zagler, Wolfgang L. and Karshmer, Arthur I. (eds.) ICCHP 2006 - Computers Helping People with Special Needs, 10th International Conference July 11-13, 2006, Linz, Austria. pp. 353-360. Available online

 
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Saarinen, Rami, Jrvi, Janne, Raisamo, Roope, Tuominen, Eva, Kangassalo, Marjatta, Peltola, Kari and Salo, Jouni (2006): Supporting visually impaired children with software agents in a multimodal learning environment. In Virtual Reality, 9 (2) pp. 108-117. Available online

2005
 
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Saarinen, Rami, Jrvi, Janne, Raisamo, Roope and Salo, Jouni (2005): Agent-based architecture for implementing multimodal learning environments for visually impaired children. In: Lazzari, Gianni, Pianesi, Fabio, Crowley, James L., Mase, Kenji and Oviatt, Sharon L. (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2005 October 4-6, 2005, Trento, Italy. pp. 309-316. Available online

 
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Evreinov, Grigori E., Evreinova, Tatiana and Raisamo, Roope (2005): Manipulating Vibro-Tactile Sequences on Mobile PC. In: Bastide, Remi, Palanque, Philippe A. and Roth, Jorg (eds.) Engineering Human Computer Interaction and Interactive Systems, Joint Working Conferences EHCI-DSVIS 2004 July 11-13, 2005, Hamburg, Germany. pp. 245-252. Available online

 
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Sharmin, Selina, Evreinov, Grigori E. and Raisamo, Roope (2005): Non-Visual Feedback Cues for Pen Computing. In: WHC 2005 - World Haptics Conference 18-20 March, 2005, Pisa, Italy. pp. 625-628. Available online

 
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Pakkanen, Toni and Raisamo, Roope (2005): Perception Strategies in Modal-Redistributed Interaction. In: WHC 2005 - World Haptics Conference 18-20 March, 2005, Pisa, Italy. pp. 641-644. Available online

 
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Saarinen, Rami, Jrvi, Janne, Raisamo, Roope and Salo, Jouni (2005): Agent-based architecture for implementing multimodal learning environments for visually impaired children. In: Proceedings of the 2005 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2005. pp. 309-316. Available online

Visually impaired children have a great disadvantage in the modern society since their ability to use modern computer technology is limited due to inappropriate user interfaces. The aim of the work presented in this paper was to develop a multimodal software architecture and applications to support visually impaired children and to enable them to interact equally with sighted children in learning situations. The architecture is based on software agents, and has specific support for visual, auditory and haptic interaction. It has been used successfully with different groups of 7-8-year-old and 12-year-old visually impaired children. In this paper we focus on the enabling software technology and interaction techniques aimed to realize our goal.

© All rights reserved Saarinen et al. and/or their publisher

2004
 
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Raisamo, Roope (2004): TrackMouse: a new solution for 2+2D interactions. In: Proceedings of the Third Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction October 23-27, 2004, Tampere, Finland. pp. 89-92. Available online

Desktop applications are more and more sophisticated. Often, the user needs several degrees of freedom (DOF) to accomplish his tasks. One solution is to provide two independent cursors for some types of interactions but this solution is mainly used in bi-manual interactions with multiple input devices. The goal of this paper is to provide a solution to manipulate two cursors with only one hand: a method for one user, with one hand, and two cursors. By this way, the second hand can be used for other purposes. We propose a new hybrid device between a haptic mouse and a trackball to give 2+2 DOF to user. A driver solution is shown to integrate this new device in Windows XP and to give an easy access to the new affordances. An application for pilot testing was implemented and the results show a high potential for the proposed solution.

© All rights reserved and/or ACM Press

 
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Isokoski, Poika and Raisamo, Roope (2004): Quikwriting as a multi-device text entry method. In: Proceedings of the Third Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction October 23-27, 2004, Tampere, Finland. pp. 105-108. Available online

Quikwriting is a previously published technique for entering text into computers using a stylus. We report results of a longitudinal study on user performance with it. In addition to the original stylus-based usage mode we designed modes for joystick and keyboard thus making Quikwriting compatible with a wide range of computing devices. Twelve participants used the stylus and joystick modes in 20 sessions for a total of ten hours. By the end of the experiment their text entry rate was 16 wpm in the stylus mode and 13 wpm in the joystick mode. At the end we conducted a test to verify that Quikwriting skill transfers to the keyboard mode. Text entry rate for the first five minutes of use in the keyboard mode was 6 wpm. In summary, the stylus mode was not particularly fast, but we found Quikwriting suitable for multi-device use.

© All rights reserved Isokoski and Raisamo and/or ACM Press

 
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Parviainen, Jyrki, Sainio, Nina and Raisamo, Roope (2004): Perceiving Tools in 3D Sculpting. In: Masoodian, Masood, Jones, Steve and Rogers, Bill (eds.) Computer Human Interaction 6th Asia Pacific Conference - APCHI 2004 June 29 - July 2, 2004, Rotorua, New Zealand. pp. 328-337. Available online

 
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Raisamo, Jukka and Raisamo, Roope (2004): Enhancing Interactive Graph Manipulation Tools with Tactile Feedback. In: Masoodian, Masood, Jones, Steve and Rogers, Bill (eds.) Computer Human Interaction 6th Asia Pacific Conference - APCHI 2004 June 29 - July 2, 2004, Rotorua, New Zealand. pp. 359-368. Available online

 
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Patomki, Saija, Raisamo, Roope, Salo, Jouni, Pasto, Virpi and Hippula, Arto (2004): Experiences on haptic interfaces for visually impaired young children. In: Sharma, Rajeev, Darrell, Trevor, Harper, Mary P., Lazzari, Gianni and Turk, Matthew (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2004 October 13-15, 2004, State College, PA, USA. pp. 281-288. Available online

 
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Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope and Krkkinen, Pivi (2004): A Method for Interactive Graph Manipulation. In: IV 2004 - 8th International Conference on Information Visualisation 14-16 July, 2004, London, UK. pp. 581-587. Available online

 
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Evreinov, Grigori E. and Raisamo, Roope (2004): Optimizing Menu Selection Process for Single-Switch Manipulation. In: Klaus, Joachim, Miesenberger, Klaus, Zagler, Wolfgang L. and Burger, Dominique (eds.) ICCHP 2004 - Computers Helping People with Special Needs - 9th International Conference July 7-9, 2004, Paris, France. pp. 836-844. Available online

 
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Patomki, Saija, Raisamo, Roope, Salo, Jouni, Pasto, Virpi and Hippula, Arto (2004): Experiences on haptic interfaces for visually impaired young children. In: Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2004. pp. 281-288. Available online

Visually impaired children do not have equal opportunities to learn and play compared to sighted children. Computers have a great potential to correct this problem. In this paper we present a series of studies where multimodal applications were designed for a group of eleven visually impaired children aged from 3.5 to 7.5 years. We also present our testing procedure specially adapted for visually impaired young children. During the two-year project it became clear that with careful designing of the tasks and proper use of haptic and auditory features usable computing environments can be created for visually impaired children.

© All rights reserved Patomki et al. and/or their publisher

2002
 
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Evreinova, Tatiana and Raisamo, Roope (2002): An evaluation of color patterns for imaging of warning signals in cockpit displays. In: Proceedings of the Second Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction October 19-23, 2002, Aarhus, Denmark. pp. 205-208. Available online

The quality of information perception in an aircraft cockpit depends on the way of interacting with display units, including modality, interface structure, and external exploitation conditions. The goal of this work is to find a solution that would allow real-time imaging or doubling of audible warning signals through spatial-temporal color coding. Software emulation of the peripheral display was built. The development and pilot evaluation of the method were both performed. Presentation of visual signals in paracentral field is efficient, but their optical and temporal parameters are critical in relation to distraction effect.

© All rights reserved Evreinova and Raisamo and/or ACM Press

 
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Makinen, Erno, Patomaki, Saija and Raisamo, Roope (2002): Experiences on a multimodal information kiosk with an interactive agent. In: Proceedings of the Second Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction October 19-23, 2002, Aarhus, Denmark. pp. 275-278. Available online

Information kiosks provide useful information to many people in many different situations and they should be easy to use since persons with little or no knowledge of computing may use them. One way to ease interaction between a user and a kiosk is multimodal interaction. In this paper, we present a multimodal kiosk that includes a computer vision component and an interactive agent that makes use of computer vision. We also discuss preliminary results of user tests that were carried out with the kiosk.

© All rights reserved Makinen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Evreinov, Grigori E. and Raisamo, Roope (2002): Cyclic Input of Characters through a Single Button Manipulation. In: Miesenberger, Klaus, Klaus, Joachim and Zagler, Wolfgang L. (eds.) ICCHP 2002 - Computers Helping People with Special Needs - 8th International Conference July 15-20, 2002, Linz, Austria. pp. 259-266. Available online

 
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Evreinova, Tatiana and Raisamo, Roope (2002): Visualization of Music Notation for Partially Sighted Persons. In: Miesenberger, Klaus, Klaus, Joachim and Zagler, Wolfgang L. (eds.) ICCHP 2002 - Computers Helping People with Special Needs - 8th International Conference July 15-20, 2002, Linz, Austria. pp. 682-683. Available online

2000
 
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Raisamo, Roope and Raiha, Kari-Jouko (2000): Design and Evaluation of the Alignment Stick. In Interacting with Computers, 12 (5) pp. 483-506.

Object alignment is one of the basic operations in drawing programs. Current solutions provide mainly three ways for carrying out this operation: either by issuing an alignment command, or by using direct positioning with the help of gravity active points, or by making use of constraints. The first technique has limited functionality, and the other two may be difficult to learn for a novice. We describe here a new direct manipulation tool for alignment. We show that while direct manipulation helps to make the normal use of the tool intuitive, it also offers advanced functionality not found in current commercial products. We report on an empirical study in which we compared the ease of use, intuitiveness, learnability, and efficiency of alignment menus, palettes and the alignment stick. In the study novice users found the basic operation of the alignment stick natural and easy to learn. The increased functionality was best appreciated and utilized by the experienced users.

© All rights reserved Raisamo and and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Raisamo, Roope and Niemi, Tapio (2000): Interactive Layout Techniques for Conceptual Schema Editors. In: Proceedings of the First Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2000. .

Automatic layout algorithms of graphs are a widely studied topic. A good survey for the literature of the area was presented by Di Battista et al. (1994). In principle, the automatic methods can work well and produce clear and beautiful schemas. However, they cannot take into account semantic information in the schema - at least it would be very difficult.

© All rights reserved Raisamo and Niemi and/or their publisher

 
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Isokoski, Poika and Raisamo, Roope (2000): Device Independant Text Input: A Rationale and an Example. In: Advanced Visual Interfaces 2000 2000. pp. 76-83.

1999
 
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Raisamo, Roope (1999): An Alternative Way of Drawing. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 175-182. Available online

Current object-oriented drawing programs have an established way of drawing in which the shape of an object is controlled by manipulating control points. While the control points are intuitive in their basic use, it is not clear whether they make more complex drawing tasks manageable for the average user. In this paper we describe an alternative way of drawing and editing a drawing using new direct manipulation tools. Our approach resembles sculpting in two dimensions: the user begins with a large block and uses different tools to give it the desired shape. We also present a user evaluation in which the users could try our new tools and compare them to their previous experience of control points. The users claimed to understand the operations better with our tools than if they had needed to use curves and control points. However, our tools were better suited for sketching the artwork than for making very detailed drawings.

© All rights reserved Raisamo and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Brown, Marc H., Najork, Marc and Raisamo, Roope (1997): A Java-Based Implementation of Collaborative Active Textbooks. In: VL 1997 1997. pp. 376-383.

1996
 
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Raisamo, Roope and Raiha, Kari-Jouko (1996): A New Direct Manipulation Technique for Aligning Objects in Drawing Programs. In: Kurlander, David, Brown, Marc and Rao, Ramana (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 1996, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 157-164. Available online

Current drawing programs provide mainly three ways for carrying out object alignment: either by issuing an alignment command, or by using direct positioning with the help of gravity active points, or by making use of constraints. The first technique has limited functionality, and the other two may be mysterious for a novice. We describe here a new direct manipulation tool for alignment. We show that while direct manipulation helps to make the tool intuitive, it has through iterative design evolved into a tool that also offers functionality not found in current commercial products.

© All rights reserved Raisamo and Raiha and/or ACM Press

 
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