Publication statistics

Pub. period:1983-2011
Pub. count:7
Number of co-authors:18



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Kien Chuan Chua:2
Shengdong Zhao:2
Kok-Lim Low:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Richard Davis's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Steve Whittaker:68
Bill N. Schilit:26
 
 
 

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Richard Davis

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Publications by Richard Davis (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Kazi, Rubaiat Habib, Chua, Kien Chuan, Zhao, Shengdong, Davis, Richard and Low, Kok-Lim (2011): SandCanvas: a multi-touch art medium inspired by sand animation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1283-1292.

Sand animation is a performance art technique in which an artist tells stories by creating animated images with sand. Inspired by this medium, we have developed a new multi-touch digital artistic medium named SandCanvas that simplifies the creation of sand animations. SandCanvas also goes beyond traditional sand animation with tools for mixing sand animation with video and replicating recorded free-form hand gestures. In this paper, we analyze common sand animation hand gestures, present SandCanvas's intuitive UI, and describe implementation challenges we encountered. We also present an evaluation with professional and novice artists that shows the importance and unique affordances of this new medium.

© All rights reserved Kazi et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Kazi, Rubaiat Habib, Chua, Kien Chuan, Zhao, Shengdong, Davis, Richard and Low, Kok-Lim (2011): SandCanvas: new possibilities in sand animation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. p. 483.

Sand animation is a performance art technique in which an artist tells stories by creating animated images with sand. Inspired by this medium, we have developed a new multi-touch digital artistic medium named SandCanvas that simplifies the creation of sand animations. The elegance of sand animation lies in the seamless flow of expressive hand gestures that cause images to fluidly evolve, surprising and delighting audiences. While physical sand animation already possesses these properties, SandCanvas enhances them. SandCanvas's color and texture features enable faster, more dramatic transitions, while its mixed media and gesture recording features make it possible to create entirely new experiences. Session recording and frame capture complement these capabilities by simplifying post-production of sand animation performances.

© All rights reserved Kazi et al. and/or their publisher

2000
 
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Whittaker, Steve, Davis, Richard, Hirschberg, Julia and Muller, Urs (2000): Jotmail: A Voicemail Interface that Enables You to See what was Said. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 89-96.

Voicemail is a pervasive, but under-researched tool for workplace communication. Despite potential advantages of voicemail over email, current phone-based voicemail UIs are highly problematic for users. We present a novel, Web-based, voicemail interface, Jotmail. The design was based on data from several studies of voicemail tasks and user strategies. The GUI has two main elements: (a) personal annotations that serve as a visual analogue to underlying speech; (b) automatically derived message header information. We evaluated Jotmail in an 8-week field trial, where people used it as their only means for accessing voicemail. Jotmail was successful in supporting most key voicemail tasks, although users' electronic annotation and archiving behaviors were different from our initial predictions. Our results argue for the utility of a combination of annotation based indexing and automatically derived information, as a general technique for accessing speech archives.

© All rights reserved Whittaker et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Davis, Richard, Landay, James A., Chen, Victor, Huang, Jonathan, Lee, Rebecca B., Li, Francis, Lin, James, Morrey III, Charles B. and Schleimer, Ben (1999): NotePals: Lightweight Note Sharing by the Group, for the Group. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 338-345.

NotePals is a lightweight note sharing system that gives group members easy access to each other's experiences through their personal notes. The system allows notes taken by group members in any context to be uploaded to a shared repository. Group members view these notes with browsers that allow them to retrieve all notes taken in a given context or to access notes from other related notes or documents. This is possible because NotePals records the context in which each note is created (e.g., its author, subject, and creation time). The system is "lightweight" because it fits easily into group members' regular note-taking practices, and uses informal, ink-based user interfaces that run on portable, inexpensive hardware. In this paper we describe NotePals, show how we have used it to share our notes, and present our evaluations of the system.

© All rights reserved Davis et al. and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Davis, Richard, Lin, James, Brotherton, Jason, Landay, James A., Price, Morgan N. and Schilit, Bill N. (1998): A Framework for Sharing Handwritten Notes. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 119-120.

NotePals is an ink-based, collaborative note taking application that runs on personal digital assistants (PDAs). Meeting participants write notes in their own handwriting on a PDA. These notes are shared with other participants by synchronizing later with a shared note repository that can be viewed using a desktop-based web browser. NotePals is distinguished by its lightweight process, interface, and hardware. This demonstration illustrates the design of two different NotePals clients and our web-based note browser.

© All rights reserved Davis et al. and/or ACM Press

1983
 
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Davis, Richard (1983): User Error or Computer Error? Observations on a Statistics Package. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 19 (4) pp. 359-376.

A detailed observational study of 11 psychologists using a statistics package, SPSS, to analyse their research work is presented. The shortcomings of the interaction were pinpointed by various error classifications. The use of an expert's macro-command facility by a casual user is discussed, highlighting the problems of changing existing interfaces. Various differences between batch and interactive processing are also reported. The results are then reviewed and discussed within the framework of existing MMIF guidelines.

© All rights reserved Davis and/or Academic Press

 
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Davis, Richard (1983): Task Analysis and User Errors: A Methodology for Assessing Interactions. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 19 (6) pp. 561-574.

A methodology for integrating observational data of specific human errors with theoretical task analysis of the man-machine interface is presented. Error data collected during sessions using an emi-interactive statistics package are superimposed on a Command Language Grammar [a task analysis developed by Moran (1981)]. The match/mismatch between user's goals and the implementation requirements of the computer system at various levels of analysis are described. The mismatch boundaries are discussed, and recommendations are derived for the interface and the methodological approach.

© All rights reserved Davis and/or Academic Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Jul 2011: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/richard_davis.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1983-2011
Pub. count:7
Number of co-authors:18



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Kien Chuan Chua:2
Shengdong Zhao:2
Kok-Lim Low:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Richard Davis's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Steve Whittaker:68
Bill N. Schilit:26
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
92% booked. Starts in 3 days
go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
91% booked. Starts in 4 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading