Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2010
Pub. count:28
Number of co-authors:30



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Sukeshini A. Grandhi:8
Loren Terveen:7
Steve Whittaker:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Quentin Jones's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Starr Roxanne Hilt..:69
Loren Terveen:69
Steve Whittaker:68
 
 
 

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Quentin Jones

Ph.D

Picture of Quentin Jones.
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Has also published under the name of:
"Q. Jones"

Personal Homepage:
cricket.njit.edu/people/quentin/

Current place of employment:
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Quentin Jones is an assistant professor at the New JerseyInstitute of Technology (NJIT). He is the codirector of NJIT'sSmartCampus Project, an effort to explore location-aware community system design, utility, and social impacts. His research and teaching focus is social computing with an emphasis on the design of collaborative environments. Jones has a PhD in Information Systems from Haifa University, Israel.

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Publications by Quentin Jones (bibliography)

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2010
 
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Grandhi, Sukeshini A., Schuler, Richard P. and Jones, Quentin (2010): Telling calls: making informed call handling decisions. In: Proceedings of DIS10 Designing Interactive Systems 2010. pp. 43-46.

Call handling decisions are made based on explicit information such as caller ID and/or implicit knowledge inferred from previous interactions. Our previous work showed that people often answer calls to find out the reason behind the call. This suggests that the provision of explicit information regarding what a call is about or under what circumstances is it being made can be of value in call handling decisions. To explore this concept we developed Telling Calls a prototype application for cell phone users to provide and receive call related information. We present the design rationale and lessons learned from qualitative accounts of users' experience with the application in their daily life. Our findings confirm the utility of our design and suggest ways in which we can improve the design to support informed call handling decisions in mobile phones.

© All rights reserved Grandhi et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Raban, Daphne R., Moldovan, Mihai and Jones, Quentin (2010): An empirical study of critical mass and online community survival. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 71-80.

There is general consensus that critical mass at inception ensures the sustained success of online communities. However, no clear understanding of what constitutes such a 'critical mass' exists and too few quantitative studies have been conducted into the relationship between initial online community interaction and its longer term success to draw any conclusions. In this paper we start to address this gap through a large-scale study of the relationship between IRC chat channel survival and initial chat channel community interactions. A sample 282 chat channel births was used for survival analysis which explored the relationship between the overall user activity in each channel at its inception and the channel's life expectancy. Significant relationships were observed between online community lifespan and critical mass measures: 1) message volume, 2) user population heterogeneity and 3) production functions. The results lend support to the Critical Mass Theory of collective action.

© All rights reserved Raban et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Grandhi, Sukeshini and Jones, Quentin (2010): Technology-mediated interruption management. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 68 (5) pp. 288-306.

Previous research into providing interpersonal technology-mediated interruption management support has predominantly been conducted from a paradigmatic standpoint that focused on modeling the context of the person being interrupted (interruptee) such as his/her mental workload, activity and location as a means to identify opportune/inopportune moments for communication. However, the utility of this approach and the associated design implications are questioned by the interruption value evaluation paradigm, which holds that interpersonal interruption management decisions are often made by people assessing factors such as who the interruption is from and what it is about (the relational context). To assess the validity of the competing assumptions underlining these paradigms about everyday interpersonal interruption management, a field study of interruption management practices in everyday cell phone use was conducted. Analysis of 1201 incoming calls from our experience sampling method study of cell phone use shows that "who" is calling

© All rights reserved Grandhi and Jones and/or Academic Press

 
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Mayer, Julia M., Motahari, Sara, Schuler, Richard P. and Jones, Quentin (2010): Common attributes in an unusual context: predicting the desirability of a social match. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Conference on Recommender Systems 2010. pp. 337-340.

Social matching systems recommend people to other people. With the widespread adoption of smartphones, mobile social matching systems could potentially transform our social landscape. However, we have a limited understanding of what makes a good social match in the mobile context. We present a theoretical framework which outlines how a user's context and the rarity of different affinity measures in various contexts (match rarity) can be used to provide valuable social matches. We suggest that if a user attribute is very rare in a particular context, users will generally be more interested in an affinity match. We conducted a survey study to assess this framework with 117 respondents. We found that both context and match rarity significantly influence interest in a social match. These results validate the key aspects of the framework. We discuss the results in terms of implications for social matching system design.

© All rights reserved Mayer et al. and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Grandhi, Sukeshini A., Schuler, Richard P. and Jones, Quentin (2009): To answer or not to answer: that is the question for cell phone users. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4621-4626.

People are constantly making decisions to answer or ignore cell phone calls based on inferences derived from partial information about the incoming call. To gain an understanding of this information deficit we conducted a survey study of cell phone call handling practices. The results highlight the type and extent of information desired about incoming cell phone calls. It also shows that desired information is largely unknown and often misattributed by the receiver. Our findings can be used by designers to prioritize the presentation of additional types of call related information on cell phone displays, and in so doing, empower users to make informed call handling decisions.

© All rights reserved Grandhi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Motahari, Sara, Ziavras, Sotirios, Schuler, Richard P. and Jones, Quentin (2009): Identity Inference as a Privacy Risk in Computer-Mediated Communication. In: HICSS 2009 - 42st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 5-8 January, 2009, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. pp. 1-10.

 
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Raban, Daphne R., Ricken, Stephen R., Grandhi, Sukeshini A., Laws, Nathaniel and Jones, Quentin (2009): Hello Stranger! A Study of Introductory Communication Structure and Social Match Success. In: HICSS 2009 - 42st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 5-8 January, 2009, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. pp. 1-9.

 
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Grandhi, Sukeshini A. and Jones, Quentin (2009): Conceptualizing Interpersonal Interruption Management: A Theoretical Framework and Research Program. In: HICSS 2009 - 42st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 5-8 January, 2009, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. pp. 1-10.

 
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Motahari, Sara, Ziavras, Sotirios and Jones, Quentin (2009): Designing for different levels of social inference risk. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 23.

2008
 
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Jones, Quentin, Moldovan, Mihai, Raban, Daphne and Butler, Brian (2008): Empirical evidence of information overload constraining chat channel community interactions. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 323-332.

Prior work has demonstrated that the impact of individual information-processing limits can be observed in dynamics of mass interaction in asynchronous collaborative systems (Usenet newsgroups and email lists). Here we present the first evidence of such impacts on synchronous social interaction environments through the analysis of an Internet Relay Chat network. We highlight how shared public discourse in chat channels appears to be limited to 40 posters in any 20 minute interval, even as the number of channel users increases well into the hundreds. We discuss our findings in terms of understanding the relationship between online community space types and the user interaction dynamics they support.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Quentin, Grandhi, Sukeshini, Karam, Samer, Whittaker, Steve, Zhou, Changqing and Terveen, Loren (2008): Geographic 'Place' and 'Community Information' Preferences. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (2) pp. 137-167.

People dynamically structure social interactions and activities at various locations in their environments in specialized types of places such as the office, home, coffee shop, museum and school. They also imbue various locations with personal meaning, creating group 'hangouts' and personally meaningful 'places'. Mobile location-aware community systems can potentially utilize the existence of such 'places' to support the management of social information and interaction. However, acting effectively on this potential requires an understanding of how: (1) places and place-types relate to people's desire for place-related awareness of and communication with others; and (2) what information people are willing to provide about themselves to enable place-related communication and awareness. We present here the findings from two qualitative studies, a survey of 509 individuals in New York, and a study of how mobility traces can be used to find people's important places in an exploration of these questions. These studies highlight how people value and are willing to routinely provide information such as ratings, comments, event records relevant to a place, and when appropriate their location to enable services. They also suggest how place and place-type data could be used in conjunction with other information regarding people and places so that systems can be deployed that respect users' People-to-People-to-Places data sharing preferences. We conclude with a discussion on how 'place' data can best be utilized to enable services when the systems in question are supported by a sophisticated computerized user-community social-geographical model.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Jones, Quentin, Grandhi, Sukeshini, Karam, Samer, Whittaker, Steve, Zhou, Changqing and Terveen, Loren (2008): Geographic 'Place' and 'Community Information' Preferences. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (2) pp. 137-167.

People dynamically structure social interactions and activities at various locations in their environments in specialized types of places such as the office, home, coffee shop, museum and school. They also imbue various locations with personal meaning, creating group 'hangouts' and personally meaningful 'places'. Mobile location-aware community systems can potentially utilize the existence of such 'places' to support the management of social information and interaction. However, acting effectively on this potential requires an understanding of how: (1) places and place-types relate to people's desire for place-related awareness of and communication with others; and (2) what information people are willing to provide about themselves to enable place-related communication and awareness. We present here the findings from two qualitative studies, a survey of 509 individuals in New York, and a study of how mobility traces can be used to find people's important places in an exploration of these questions. These studies highlight how people value and are willing to routinely provide information such as ratings, comments, event records relevant to a place, and when appropriate their location to enable services. They also suggest how place and place-type data could be used in conjunction with other information regarding people and places so that systems can be deployed that respect users' People-to-People-to-Places data sharing preferences. We conclude with a discussion on how 'place' data can best be utilized to enable services when the systems in question are supported by a sophisticated computerized user-community social-geographical model.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

2007
 
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Motahari, Sara, Manikopoulos, Constantine, Hiltz, Roxanne and Jones, Quentin (2007): Seven privacy worries in ubiquitous social computing. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2007. pp. 171-172.

Review of the literature suggests seven fundamental privacy challenges in the domain of ubiquitous social computing. To date, most research in this area has focused on the features associated with the revelation of personal location data. However, a more holistic view of privacy concerns that acknowledges these seven risks is required if we are to deploy privacy respecting next generation social computing applications. We highlight the threat associated with user inferences made possible by knowledge of the context and use of social ties. We also describe work in progress to both understand user perceptions and build a privacy sensitive urban enclave social computing system.

© All rights reserved Motahari et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kim, Eunhee, Plummer, Maria, Hiltz, Starr Roxanne and Jones, Quentin (2007): Perceived Benefits and Concerns of Prospective Users of the SmartCampus Location-Aware Community System Test-bed. In: HICSS 2007 - 40th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 3-6 January, 2007, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 19.

2005
 
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Grandhi, Sukeshini A., Jones, Quentin and Karam, Samer (2005): Sharing the big apple: a survey study of people, place and locatability. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1407-1410.

With the advancement in technologies to locate individuals, there has been an emergence of information systems that link People-to-People-to-Geographical-Places, labeled P3-Systems. While various P3-System services have been proposed and deployed, there is limited knowledge on people's desires and attitudes towards such services. We used the P3-Systems framework to guide a survey study of the impact of 'place' on people's social information needs and willingness to share personal location data. At fourteen different place types (Restaurant, Post Office, Etc.) in Manhattan, New York, we surveyed 509 individuals over 3 weeks. The vast majority of respondents expressed a desire for and willing to share their personal location data. E.g., 77% of respondents were willing to reveal their current location to others (17% with complete strangers).

© All rights reserved Grandhi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Quentin and Grandhi, Sukeshini A. (2005): P3 Systems: Putting the Place Back into Social Networks. In IEEE Internet Computing, 9 (5) pp. 38-46.

2004
 
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Jones, Quentin, Grandhi, Sukeshini A., Whittaker, Steve, Chivakula, Keerti and Terveen, Loren (2004): Putting systems into place: a qualitative study of design requirements for location-aware community systems. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 202-211.

We present a conceptual framework for location-aware community systems and results from two studies of how socially-defined places influence people's information sharing and communication needs. The first study identified a relationship between people's familiarity with a place and their desire for either stable or dynamic place-related information. The second study explored the utility of various system features highlighted by our conceptual framework. It clarified the role of place information in informal social interaction; it also showed that people valued, and were willing to provide information such as ratings, comments, and event records relevant to a place. These preliminary findings have important implications for the design of location-aware community systems. In particular, they suggest that such systems must integrate information about places with data about users' personal routines and social relationships.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Quentin, Grandhi, Sukeshini A., Terveen, Loren and Whittaker, Steve (2004): People-to-People-to-Geographical-Places: The P3 Framework for Location-Based Community Systems. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 13 (3) pp. 249-282.

In this paper we examine an emerging class of systems that link People-to-People-to-Geographical-Places; we call these P3-Systems. Through analyzing the literature, we have identified four major P3-System design techniques: People-Centered systems that use either absolute user location (e.g. Active Badge) or user proximity (e.g. Hocman) and Place-Centered systems based on either a representation of peoples use of physical spaces (e.g. ActiveMap) or on a matching virtual space that enables online interaction linked to physical location (e.g. Geonotes). In addition, each feature can be instantiated synchronously or asynchronously. The P3-System framework organizes existing systems into meaningful categories and structures the design space for an interesting new class of potentially context-aware systems. Our discussion of the framework suggests new ways of understanding and addressing the privacy concerns associated with location aware community system and outlines additional socio-technical challenges and opportunities.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Whittaker, Steve, Jones, Quentin, Nardi, Bonnie A., Creech, Mike, Terveen, Loren, Isaacs, Ellen and Hainsworth, John (2004): ContactMap: Organizing communication in a social desktop. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 11 (4) pp. 445-471.

Modern work is a highly social process, offering many cues for people to organize communication and access information. Shared physical workplaces provide natural support for tasks such as (a) social reminding about communication commitments and keeping track of collaborators and friends, and (b) social data mining of local expertise for advice and information. However, many people now collaborate remotely using tools such as email and voicemail. Our field studies show that these tools do not provide the social cues needed for group work processes. In part, this is because the tools are organized around messages, rather than people. In response to this problem, we created ContactMap, a system that makes people the primary unit of interaction. ContactMap provides a structured social desktop representation of users' important contacts that directly supports social reminding and social data mining. We conducted an empirical evaluation of ContactMap, comparing it with traditional email systems, on tasks suggested by our fieldwork. Users performed better with ContactMap and preferred ContactMap for the majority of these tasks. We discuss future enhancements of our system and the implications of these results for future communication interfaces and for theories of mediated communication.

© All rights reserved Whittaker et al. and/or ACM Press

2003
 
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Jones, Quentin (2003): Applying cyber-archaeology. In: Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2003. pp. 41-60.

2002
 
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Whittaker, Steve, Jones, Quentin and Terveen, Loren (2002): Contact management: identifying contacts to support long-term communication. In: Churchill, Elizabeth F., McCarthy, Joe, Neuwirth, Christine and Rodden, Tom (eds.) Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. pp. 216-225.

Much of our daily communication activity involves managing interpersonal communications and relationships. Despite its importance, this activity of contact management is poorly understood. We report on field and lab studies that begin to illuminate it. A field study of business professionals confirmed the importance of contact management and revealed a major difficulty: selecting important contacts from the large set of people with whom one communicates. These interviews also showed that communication history is a key resource for this task. Informants identified several history-based criteria that they considered useful.We conducted a lab study to test how well these criteria predict contact importance. Subjects identified important contacts from their email archives. We then analyzed their email to extract features for all contacts. Reciprocity, recency and longevity of email interaction proved to be strong predictors of contact importance. The experiment also identified another contact management problem: removing 'stale' contacts from long term archives. We discuss the design and theoretical implications of these results.

© All rights reserved Whittaker et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Quentin, Ravid, Gilad and Rafaeli, Sheizaf (2002): An Empirical Exploration of Mass Interaction System Dynamics: Individual Information Overload and Usenet Discourse. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 114.

 
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Whittaker, Steve, Jones, Quentin and Terveen, Loren (2002): Managing Long Term Communications: Conversation and Contact Management. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 115.

2001
 
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Jones, Quentin, Ravid, G. and Rafaeli, S. (2001): Information Overload and Virtual Public Discourse Boundaries. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT01: Human-Computer Interaction 2001, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 43-50.

2000
 
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Jones, Quentin (2000): Time to Split, Virtually: Expanding Virtual Publics into Vibrant Virtual Metropolises. In: HICSS 2000 2000. .

 
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Jones, Quentin and Rafaeli, Sheizaf (2000): What Do Virtual ''Tells'' Tell? Placing Cybersociety Research into a Hierarchy of Social Explanation. In: HICSS 2000 2000. .

1999
 
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Jones, Quentin and Rafaeli, Sheizaf (1999): User Population and User Contributions to Virtual Publics: A Systems Model. In: Proceedings of the International ACM SIGGROUP Conference on Supporting Group Work 1999 November 14-17, 1999, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. pp. 239-248.

This paper provides a comprehensive review of empirical research into user contributions to computer-mediated discourse in public cyber-spaces, referred to here as virtual publics. This review is used to build a systems model of such discourse. The major components of the model are i) critical mass, ii) social loafing, and iii) the collective impact of individual cognitive constraints on the processing of group messages. By drawing these three components into a single model it becomes possible to describe the shape of a "user-contributions/user-population function" after controlling for context. Virtual publics can be created with the support of various technologies including email, newsgroups, webbased bulletin boards etc. Traditionally the choice of technology platform and the way it is used has largely depended on arbitrary factors. This paper suggests that choices of this nature can be based on knowledge about required segmentation points for discourse as they relate to a particular type of technology. This is because the "user-contributions/user-population function" will map differently to different classes of technology. Similarly the different classes of technologies used to enable virtual publics will each have different stress zones at which users will experience information overload resulting from computer mediated discourse.

© All rights reserved Jones and Rafaeli and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Jones, Quentin (1997): Virtual-Communities, Virtual Settlements & Cyber-Archaeology: A Theoretical Outline. In J. Computer-Mediated Communication, 3 (3) .

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/quentin_jones.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2010
Pub. count:28
Number of co-authors:30



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Sukeshini A. Grandhi:8
Loren Terveen:7
Steve Whittaker:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Quentin Jones's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Starr Roxanne Hilt..:69
Loren Terveen:69
Steve Whittaker:68
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
89% booked. Starts in 6 days
go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
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Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading