Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2010
Pub. count:47
Number of co-authors:37



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Simeon Keates:13
Patrick Langdon:7
P. John Clarkson:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Peter Robinson's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Philippe A. Palanq..:66
Laurence Nigay:62
Simeon Keates:37
 
 
 
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Publications by Peter Robinson (bibliography)

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2010
 
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Riek, Laurel D., Rabinowitch, Tal-Chen, Bremner, Paul, Pipe, Anthony G., Fraser, Mike and Robinson, Peter (2010): Cooperative gestures: effective signaling for humanoid robots. In: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2010. pp. 61-68.

Cooperative gestures are a key aspect of human-human pro-social interaction. Thus, it is reasonable to expect that endowing humanoid robots with the ability to use such gestures when interacting with humans would be useful. However, while people are used to responding to such gestures expressed by other humans, it is unclear how they might react to a robot making them. To explore this topic, we conducted a within-subjects, video based laboratory experiment, measuring time to cooperate with a humanoid robot making interactional gestures. We manipulated the gesture type (beckon, give, shake hands), the gesture style (smooth, abrupt), and the gesture orientation (front, side). We also employed two measures of individual differences: negative attitudes toward robots (NARS) and human gesture decoding ability (DANVA2-POS). Our results show that people cooperate with abrupt gestures more quickly than smooth ones and front-oriented gestures more quickly than those made to the side, people's speed at decoding robot gestures is correlated with their ability to decode human gestures, and negative attitudes toward robots is strongly correlated with a decreased ability in decoding human gestures.

© All rights reserved Riek et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Biswas, Pradipta and Robinson, Peter (2010): Evaluating the design of inclusive interfaces by simulation. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2010. pp. 277-280.

We have developed a simulator to help with the design and evaluation of assistive interfaces. The simulator can predict possible interaction patterns when undertaking a task using a variety of input devices, and estimate the time to complete the task in the presence of different dis-abilities. In this paper, we have presented a study to evaluate the simulator by considering a representative application being used by able-bodied, visually impaired and mobility impaired people. The simulator predicted task completion times for all three groups with statistically significant accuracy. The simulator also predicted the effects of different interface designs on task completion time accurately.

© All rights reserved Biswas and Robinson and/or their publisher

 
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Langdon, Patrick, Clarkson, John and Robinson, Peter (2010): Designing inclusive futures. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 9 (3) pp. 191-193.

2009
 
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Tuddenham, Philip and Robinson, Peter (2009): Territorial coordination and workspace awareness in remote tabletop collaboration. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2139-2148.

There is growing interest in tabletop interfaces that enable remote collaboration by providing shared workspaces. This approach assumes that these remote tabletops afford the same beneficial work practices as co-located tabletop interfaces and traditional tables. This assumption has not been tested in practice. We explore two such work practices in remote tabletop collaboration: (a) coordination by territorial partitioning of space; and (b) transitioning between individual and group work within a shared task. We have evaluated co-located and remote tabletop collaboration. We found that remote collaborators did not coordinate territorially as co-located collaborators did. We found no differences between remote and co-located interfaces in their ability to afford individual and group work. However, certain interaction techniques impaired the ability to transition fluidly between these working styles. We discuss causes and the implications for the design and future study of these interfaces.

© All rights reserved Tuddenham and Robinson and/or ACM Press

 
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Riek, Laurel D., Rabinowitch, Tal-Chen, Chakrabarti, Bhismadev and Robinson, Peter (2009): How anthropomorphism affects empathy toward robots. In: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2009. pp. 245-246.

A long-standing question within the robotics community is about the degree of human-likeness robots ought to have when interacting with humans. We explore an unexamined aspect of this problem: how people empathize with robots along the anthropomorphic spectrum. We conducted an experiment that measured how people empathized with robots shown to be experiencing mistreatment by humans. Our results indicate that people empathize more strongly with more human-looking robots and less with mechanical-looking robots.

© All rights reserved Riek et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Tuddenham, Philip, Davies, Ian and Robinson, Peter (2009): WebSurface: an interface for co-located collaborative information gathering. In: Proceedings of the 2009 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2009. pp. 181-188.

Co-located collaborative Web browsing is a relatively common task and yet is poorly supported by conventional tools. Prior research in this area has focused on adapting conventional browsing interfaces to add collaboration support. We propose an alternative approach, drawing on ideas from tabletop interfaces. We present WebSurface, a novel tabletop interface for collaborative Web browsing. WebSurface explores two design challenges of this approach: providing sufficient resolution for legible text; and navigating through information. We report our early experiences with an exploratory user study, in which pairs of collaborators gathered information using WebSurface. The findings suggest that a tabletop approach for collaborative Web browsing can help address limitations of conventional tools, and presents beneficial affordances for information layout.

© All rights reserved Tuddenham et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Afzal, Shazia, Morrison, Cecily and Robinson, Peter (2009): Intentional affect: an alternative notion of affective interaction with a machine. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 370-374.

Affective Computing envisages truly effective human-machine interactions as being affect-sensitive. The field is both motivated and influenced by an understanding of emotion in an environment, that of person to person, that differs from its eventual application, person to machine. Analysing data obtained in a potential application environment -- computer-assisted learning -- we highlight the limitations of such an understanding and propose an alternative stance to affect, that of intentional affective interaction.

© All rights reserved Afzal et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Biswas, Pradipta and Robinson, Peter (2009): Modelling perception using image processing algorithms. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 494-503.

User modeling is widely used in HCI but there are very few systematic HCI modelling tools for people with disabilities. We are developing user models to help with the design and evaluation of interfaces for people with a wide range of abilities. We present a perception model that can work for some kinds of visually-impaired users as well as for able-bodied people. The model takes a list of mouse events, a sequence of bitmap images of an interface and locations of different objects in the interface as input, and produces a sequence of eye-movements as output. Our model can predict the visual search time for two different visual search tasks with significant accuracy for both able-bodied and visually-impaired people.

© All rights reserved Biswas and Robinson and/or their publisher

 
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Lalanne, Denis, Nigay, Laurence, Palanque, Philippe A., Robinson, Peter, Vanderdonckt, Jean and Ladry, Jean-François (2009): Fusion engines for multimodal input: a survey. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2009. pp. 153-160.

Fusion engines are fundamental components of multimodal inter-active systems, to interpret input streams whose meaning can vary according to the context, task, user and time. Other surveys have considered multimodal interactive systems; we focus more closely on the design, specification, construction and evaluation of fusion engines. We first introduce some terminology and set out the major challenges that fusion engines propose to solve. A history of past work in the field of fusion engines is then presented using the BRETAM model. These approaches to fusion are then classified. The classification considers the types of application, the fusion principles and the temporal aspects. Finally, the challenges for future work in the field of fusion engines are set out. These include software frameworks, quantitative evaluation, machine learning and adaptation.

© All rights reserved Lalanne et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Sezgin, Tevfik Metin, Davies, Ian and Robinson, Peter (2009): Multimodal inference for driver-vehicle interaction. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2009. pp. 193-198.

In this paper we present a novel system for driver-vehicle interaction which combines speech recognition with facial-expression recognition to increase intention recognition accuracy in the presence of engine- and road-noise. Our system would allow drivers to interact with in-car devices such as satellite navigation and other telematic or control systems. We describe a pilot study and experiment in which we tested the system, and show that multimodal fusion of speech and facial expression recognition provides higher accuracy than either would do alone.

© All rights reserved Sezgin et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Bernhardt, Daniel and Robinson, Peter (2008): Interactive control of music using emotional body expressions. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3117-3122.

This paper presents a novel music mixing interface which allows users to blend between pieces of music by moving their whole body in different emotional styles. Although the interface itself would be most applicable for the performing arts and gaming, the principles concerning the use of emotions and body motion analysis apply to many other areas interested in the design of intelligent user interfaces. We report the results of a pilot user study which suggest that such an interface could afford an emotionally immersive experience. However, individual user differences in the expression of emotions need to be accounted for.

© All rights reserved Bernhardt and Robinson and/or ACM Press

 
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Biswas, Pradipta and Robinson, Peter (2008): Automatic Evaluation of Assistive Interfaces. In: ACM International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces IUI 2008 January 13-16, 2008, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands. pp. 247-256.

 
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Biswas, Pradipta and Robinson, Peter (2008): Automatic evaluation of assistive interfaces. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2008. pp. 247-256.

Computers offer valuable assistance to people with physical disabilities. However designing human-computer interfaces for these users is complicated. The range of abilities is more diverse than for able-bodied users, which makes analytical modelling harder. Practical user trials are also difficult and time consuming. We are developing a simulator to help with the evaluation of assistive interfaces. It can predict the likely interaction patterns when undertaking a task using a variety of input devices, and estimate the time to complete the task in the presence of different disabilities and for different levels of skill. In this paper we describe the different components of the simulator in detail and present a prototype of its implementation.

© All rights reserved Biswas and Robinson and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Hughes, Gregory and Robinson, Peter (2007): Photonote evaluation: aiding students with disabilities in a lecture environment. In: Ninth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2007. pp. 99-106.

Visual material presented in lectures can be enhanced for students with disabilities by using high-resolution digital-still cameras. The Photonote system uses a digital-still camera to capture visual information, a digital-video camera to capture a lecturer and a second digital-video camera to capture a sign-language interpreter, if necessary. The visual information is enhanced using computer-vision algorithms and presented alongside the recorded video and audio to provide an accurate representation of a lecture which can be used by students with disabilities for review purposes. This paper presents the Photonote system and a user study evaluating its effectiveness at aiding students with disabilities in a lecture environment.

© All rights reserved Hughes and Robinson and/or ACM Press

 
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Biswas, Pradipta and Robinson, Peter (2007): Simulation to predict performance of assistive interfaces. In: Ninth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2007. pp. 227-228.

Computers offer valuable assistance to people with physical disabilities. However designing human-computer interfaces for these users is complicated. The range of abilities is more diverse than for able-bodied users, which makes analytical modelling harder. Practical user trials are also difficult and time consuming. We have developed a simulator to help with the evaluation of assistive interfaces. It can predict the likely interaction patterns when undertaking a task using a variety of input devices, and estimate the time to complete the task in the presence of different disabilities and for different levels of skill. Computers offer valuable assistance to people with physical disabilities. However designing human-computer interfaces for these users is complicated. The range of abilities is more diverse than for able-bodied users, which makes analytical modelling harder. Practical user trials are also difficult and time consuming. We have developed a simulator to help with the evaluation of assistive interfaces. It can predict the likely interaction patterns when undertaking a task using a variety of input devices, and estimate the time to complete the task in the presence of different disabilities and for different levels of skill.

© All rights reserved Biswas and Robinson and/or ACM Press

 
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Robinson, Peter and Tuddenham, Philip (2007): Distributed Tabletops: Supporting Remote and Mixed-Presence Tabletop Collaboration. In: Second IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2007 October 10-12, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 19-26.

 
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Robinson, Peter and Tuddenham, Philip (2007): T3: Rapid Prototyping of High-Resolution and Mixed-Presence Tabletop Applications. In: Second IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2007 October 10-12, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 11-18.

 
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Langdon, Patrick, Clarkson, John and Robinson, Peter (2007): Designing accessible technology. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 6 (2) pp. 117-118.

 
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Bernhardt, Daniel and Robinson, Peter (2007): Detecting Affect from Non-stylised Body Motions. In: Paiva, Ana, Prada, Rui and Picard, Rosalind W. (eds.) ACII 2007 - Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, Second International Conference September 12-14, 2007, Lisbon, Portugal. pp. 59-70.

 
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Sezgin, Tevfik Metin and Robinson, Peter (2007): Affective Video Data Collection Using an Automobile Simulator. In: Paiva, Ana, Prada, Rui and Picard, Rosalind W. (eds.) ACII 2007 - Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, Second International Conference September 12-14, 2007, Lisbon, Portugal. pp. 770-771.

2006
 
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Robinson, Peter (2006): Video user interfaces. In: Braz, José, Jorge, Joaquim A., Dias, Miguel and Marcos, Adérito (eds.) GRAPP 2006 - Proceedings of the First International Conference on Computer Graphics Theory and Applications February 25-28, 2006, Setúbal, Portugal. .

 
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Robinson, Peter (2006): Video user interfaces. In: Ranchordas, Alpesh, Araújo, Helder and Encarnação, Bruno (eds.) VISAPP 2006 - Proceedings of the First International Conference on Computer Vision Theory and Applications - 2 Volumes 2006, Setúbal, Portugal. pp. 1-10.

2005
 
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Keates, Simeon, Clarkson, John, Langdon, Patrick and Robinson, Peter (2005): Special issue on design for a more inclusive world. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 4 (2) pp. 83-84.

 
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Brown, Silas S. and Robinson, Peter (2005): Interacting with notations: two examples of the use of a transformation system. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 4 (2) pp. 96-104.

Computers can present data in different ways to fit different tasks and different users experience, abilities and disabilities. Transformation frameworks allow developers and competent end-users to experiment with alternative notations more quickly, and thus discover new presentations appropriate for particular sets of circumstances. This paper illustrates this in two separate contexts: musical notations and interfaces to complex applications software.

© All rights reserved Brown and Robinson and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Shikler, Tal Sobol and Robinson, Peter (2005): Affect Editing in Speech. In: Tao, Jianhua, Tan, Tieniu and Picard, Rosalind W. (eds.) ACII 2005 - Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, First International Conference October 22-24, 2005, Beijing, China. pp. 411-418.

 
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Kaliouby, Rana El and Robinson, Peter (2005): Generalization of a Vision-Based Computational Model of Mind-Reading. In: Tao, Jianhua, Tan, Tieniu and Picard, Rosalind W. (eds.) ACII 2005 - Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, First International Conference October 22-24, 2005, Beijing, China. pp. 582-589.

 
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Ashdown, Mark and Robinson, Peter (2005): Remote collaboration on desk-sized displays. In Journal of Visualization and Computer Animation, 16 (1) pp. 41-51.

2004
 
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Kaliouby, Rana El and Robinson, Peter (2004): FAIM: integrating automated facial affect analysis in instant messaging. In: Nunes, Nuno Jardim and Rich, Charles (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2004 January 13-16, 2004, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal. pp. 244-246.

One of the limitations in traditional instant messaging platforms is that they predominantly rely on text messages as the primary form of expression. This paper presents FAIM, an instant messaging application that analyzes a person's facial affect in real time and augments the dialogue with an emotive character representing them. Throughout the paper, we identify a number of design challenges that arise from integrating facial affect into instant messaging, and discuss how each of these issues is addressed in the design of FAIM. We also present a use case scenario of how FAIM works.

© All rights reserved Kaliouby and Robinson and/or ACM Press

 
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Keates, Simeon, Clarkson, P. John and Robinson, Peter (2004): Design for participation: providing access to e-information for older adults. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 3 (2) pp. 149-163.

Electronic information sources are becoming increasingly more prolific and offer a huge potential for those able to use them. However, for those unable to access those services, there is the risk of being further disadvantaged by continued exclusion from an increasing number of services. This paper presents two examples of kiosks designed to help principally older adults access online governmental information sources. The design issues identified and the implications for future kiosk interface designs, both for hardware and software, are also discussed.

© All rights reserved Keates et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Brown, Silas S. and Robinson, Peter (2004): Transformation frameworks and their relevance in universal design. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 3 (3) pp. 209-223.

Music, engineering, mathematics, and many other disciplines have established notations for writing their documents. Adjusting these notations can contribute to universal access by helping to address access difficulties, such as disabilities, cultural backgrounds, or restrictive hardware. Tools that support the programming of such transformations can also assist by allowing the creation of new notations on demand, which is an under-explored option in the relief of educational difficulties. This paper reviews some programming tools that can be used to effect such transformations. It also introduces a tool, called 4DML, which allows the programmer to create a model of the desired result, from which the transformation is derived.

© All rights reserved Brown and Robinson and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Ashdown, Mark and Robinson, Peter (2004): A personal projected display. In: Schulzrinne, Henning, Dimitrova, Nevenka, Sasse, Martina Angela, Moon, Sue B. and Lienhart, Rainer (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th ACM International Conference on Multimedia October 10-16, 2004, New York, NY, USA. pp. 932-933.

2003
 
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Kaliouby, Rana El and Robinson, Peter (2003): Real Time Head Gesture Recognition in Affective Interfaces. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 950.

2002
 
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Keates, Simeon, Clarkson, P. John and Robinson, Peter (2002): Developing a practical inclusive interface design approach. In Interacting with Computers, 14 (4) pp. 271-299.

It is known that many products, both software and hardware, are not accessible to large sections of the population. Designers instinctively design for able-bodied users and are either unaware of the needs of users with different capabilities, or do not know how to accommodate their needs into the design cycle. The aim of this paper is to present a methodological design approach for implementing inclusive interface design. This will begin with a discussion about what constitutes good inclusive design and suitable measures of success. A summary of the principal methods for designing for users with different capabilities is given along with a description of a model, the inclusive design cube, that displays how the different approaches are complementary and can provide complete population coverage. Two case studies shall be used to illustrate the use of the model. The first details the design of an interface for an interactive robot. The second looks at the design of an information point for use in a post office, and shall be used to highlight the use of both the design approach and the model.

© All rights reserved Keates et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Keates, Simeon, Hwang, Faustina, Langdon, Patrick, Clarkson, P. John and Robinson, Peter (2002): Cursor measures for motion-impaired computer users. In: Fifth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2002. pp. 135-142.

"Point and click" interactions remain one of the key features of graphical user interfaces (GUIs). People with motion-impairments, however, can often have difficulty with accurate control of standard pointing devices. This paper discusses work that aims to reveal the nature of these difficulties through analyses that consider the cursor's path of movement. A range of potential cursor measures was applied, and a number of them were found to be significant in capturing the differences between able-bodied users and motion-impaired users, as well as the differences between a haptic force feedback condition and a control condition. cursor measures found in the literature, however, do not make up a comprehensive list, but provide a starting point for analysing cursor movements more completely. Six new cursor characteristics for motion-impaired users are introduced to capture aspects of cursor movement different from those already proposed.

© All rights reserved Keates et al. and/or ACM Press

2001
 
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Keates, Simeon, Clarkson, P. John and Robinson, Peter (2001): Cognitive considerations in the design of multi-modal input systems. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) HCI International 2001 - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 5-10, 2001, New Orleans, USA. pp. 353-357.

 
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Keates, Simeon, Langdon, Patrick, Clarkson, P. John and Robinson, Peter (2001): A practical approach to design for universal access: the Information Point case study. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) HCI International 2001 - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 5-10, 2001, New Orleans, USA. pp. 18-22.

 
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Langdon, Patrick, Keates, Simeon, Clarkson, P. John and Robinson, Peter (2001): Investigating the parameters of force feedback assistance for motion-impaired users in a selection task. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) HCI International 2001 - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 5-10, 2001, New Orleans, USA. pp. 938-942.

2000
 
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Keates, Simeon, Langdon, Patrick, Clarkson, John and Robinson, Peter (2000): Investigating the Use of Force Feedback for Motion-Impaired Users. In: Emiliani, Pier Luigi and Stephanidis, Constantine (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th ERCIM Workshop on User Interfaces for All October 25-26, 2000, Florence, Italy. p. 6.

For users with motion impairments, the standard keyboard and mouse arrangement for computer access often presents problems. Other approaches have to be adopted to overcome this. There is evidence to suggest that increasing the degrees-of-freedom, and hence bandwidth, of human-computer interaction (HCI), can improve interaction rates if implemented carefully. Haptic feedback is not really exploited in the existing HCI paradigm, so offers a potential method for broadening the interaction bandwidth by complementing the existing interaction structure. This paper describes a series of experiments to assess the effectiveness of using haptic feedback to enhance the interaction. The experiments focused on the use of force feedback technology to assist in point-and-click activities. The results showed that, if implemented appropriately, force feedback offers a significant benefit to motion-impaired users and that the benefit obtained was increased with increasing severity of impairment.

© All rights reserved Keates et al. and/or The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics - ERCIM

 
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Keates, Simeon, Clarkson, John and Robinson, Peter (2000): Investigating the Applicability of User Models for Motion-Impaired Users. In: Fourth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2000. pp. 129-136.

This paper considers the differences between users with motion-impairments and able-bodied users when they interact with computers and the implications for user models. Most interface design and usability assessment practices are based on explicit or implicit models of user behaviour. This paper studies the applicability of an existing interface design user model to motion-impaired users for the relatively straightforward task of button activation. A discussion of the empirical results is provided and the paper concludes that there are significant differences between the behaviour of motion-impaired users and the accepted modelling theory.

© All rights reserved Keates et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Keates, Simeon, Clarkson, P. John, Harrison, Lee-Anne and Robinson, Peter (2000): Towards a Practical Inclusive Design Approach. In: Proceedings of the 2000 ACM Conference on Universal Usability 2000. pp. 45-52.

It is known that many products are not accessible to large sections of the population. Designers instinctively design for able-bodied users and are either unaware of the needs of users with different capabilities, or do not know how to accommodate their needs into the design cycle. This aim of this paper is to present a methodological design approach for implementing inclusive design. A summary of the principal methods for designing for users with different capabilities is given along with a description of a model, the Inclusive Design Cube, that displays how the different approaches are complementary and can provide complete population coverage. A case study of the design of an information point for use in a post office, shall be used to highlight the use of the model.

© All rights reserved Keates et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Keates, Simeon and Robinson, Peter (1999): Gestures and Multimodal Input. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 18 (1) pp. 36-44.

For users with motion impairments, the standard keyboard and mouse arrangement for computer access often presents problems. Other approaches have to be adopted to overcome this. In this paper, we will describe the development of a prototype multimodal input system based on two gestural input channels. Results from extensive user trials of this system are presented. These trials showed that the physical and cognitive loads on the user can quickly become excessive and detrimental to the interaction. Designers of multimodal input systems need to be aware of this and perform regular user trials to minimize the problem.

© All rights reserved Keates and Robinson and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Keates, Simeon, Clarkson, John, Coy, Joanne and Robinson, Peter (1999): Universal Access in the Work-Place: A Case Study. In: Kobsa, Alfred and Stephanidis, Constantine (eds.) Proceedings of the 5th ERCIM Workshop on User Interfaces for All November 28 - December 1, 1999, Dagstuhl, Germany. p. 7.

Universal Access belongs not only in the research laboratory, but also in an industrial environment. Many countries have set out specific legal requirements for companies to meet in terms of proportions of staff with disabilities and meeting those requirements is a new experience for many employers. More enlightened companies wish to take their commitment beyond meeting the letter of the law and to provide a genuinely inclusive work-place. However, implementing such an approach is complex. The principal aim of this paper is to describe the steps being taken by The Post Office (TPO), with the assistance of the University of Cambridge, to offer a more inclusive work-place to support a wider range of employee physical capabilities. Computer access, including interface and input system design issues, features very prominently in research at Cambridge. An approach taken to assess the potential for universal access within the TPO environment is described and the relative merits of adaptive and proactive design methods discussed. Although the case study presented is very specific and still in its preliminary stages, the generic usability issues are applicable to a wider range of computer applications.

© All rights reserved Keates et al. and/or The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics - ERCIM

1998
 
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Keates, Simeon and Robinson, Peter (1998): The Use of Gestures in Multimodal Input. In: Third Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 1998. pp. 35-42.

For users with motion impairments, the standard keyboard and mouse arrangement for computer access often presents problems. Other approaches have to be adopted to overcome this. In this paper, we will describe the development of a prototype multimodal input system based on two gestural input channels. Results from extensive user trials of this system are presented. These trials showed that the physical and cognitive loads on the user can quickly become excessive and detrimental to the interaction. Designers of multimodal input systems need to be aware of this and perform regular user trials to minimize the problem.

© All rights reserved Keates and Robinson and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Robinson, Peter, Sheppard, Dan, Watts, Richard, Harding, Robert and Lay, Steven (1997): Animated Paper Documents. In: Smith, Michael J., Salvendy, Gavriel and Koubek, Richard J. (eds.) HCI International 1997 - Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Volume 2 August 24-29, 1997, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 655-658.

 
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Robinson, Peter, Sheppard, Dan, Watts, Richard, Harding, Robert and Lay, Steven (1997): A framework for interacting with paper. In Comput. Graph. Forum, 16 (3) pp. 329-334.

1996
 
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Stafford-Fraser, Quentin and Robinson, Peter (1996): BrightBoard: A Video-Augmented Environment. In: Tauber, Michael J., Bellotti, Victoria, Jeffries, Robin, Mackinlay, Jock D. and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 96 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1996, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 134-141.

The goal of 'Computer Augmented Environments' is to bring computational power to everyday objects with which users are already familiar, so that the user interface to this computational power becomes almost invisible. Video is a very important tool in creating Augmented Environments and recent camera-manufacturing techniques make it an economically viable proposition in the general marketplace. BrightBoard is an example system which uses a video camera and audio feedback to enhance the facilities of an ordinary whiteboard, allowing a user to control a computer through simple marks made on the board. We describe its operation in some detail, and discuss how it tackles some of the problems common to these 'Video-Augmented Environments'.

© All rights reserved Stafford-Fraser and Robinson and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Ellis, Gerard, Levinson, Robert A. and Robinson, Peter (1994): Managing Complex Objects in Peirce. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 41 (1) pp. 109-148.

The Peirce project (named after Charles Sanders Peirce) is an international collaborative project aiming to construct a freely available conceptual graphs workbench to support research in the conceptual graphs community in areas such as natural language processing, enterprise modelling, program specification and verification, management information systems, conceptual information retrieval, medical informatics, and construction of ontologies. Peirce advances the state of the art in conceptual graph implementations and in general complex object classification. At the core of the Peirce system is an abstract data type for partially ordered sets of objects (poset ADT). The poset ADT is used to organize a conceptual graph database. In this paper we give an overview of the innovative methods for complex object classification, and illustrate examples using complex object databases with hierarchies of chemical formulas, images and conceptual graph program specifications. We illustrate how conceptual graphs can be used for graphic programming in traditional domains and in organic chemistry and indicate how Peirce's complex object database supports these activities.

© All rights reserved Ellis et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/peter_robinson.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2010
Pub. count:47
Number of co-authors:37



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Simeon Keates:13
Patrick Langdon:7
P. John Clarkson:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Peter Robinson's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Philippe A. Palanq..:66
Laurence Nigay:62
Simeon Keates:37
 
 
 
Jul 24

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