Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2012
Pub. count:63
Number of co-authors:77



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Rosta Farzan:9
Jae-wook Ahn:8
I-Han Hsiao:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Peter Brusilovsky's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Edward A. Fox:109
Barry Smyth:61
Richard Furuta:60
 
 
 

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Peter Brusilovsky

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Publications by Peter Brusilovsky (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Hsiao, I-Han, Guerra, Julio, Parra, Denis, Bakalov, Fedor, Knig-Ries, Birgitta and Brusilovsky, Peter (2012): Comparative social visualization for personalized e-learning. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces 2012. pp. 303-307.

Social learning has confirmed its value in enhancing the learning outcomes across a wide spectrum. To support social learning, a visual approach is a common technique to represent and organize multiple students' data in an informative way. This paper presents a design of comparative social visualization for E-learning, which encourages information discovery and social comparisons. Classroom studies confirmed the motivational impact of personalized social guidance provided by the visualization in the target context. The visualization encouraged students to do some work ahead of the course schedule. Moreover, class leaders provided an implicit social guidance for the rest of the class and successfully led the way to discover the most relevant resources creating good trails for the rest of the class. We summarized the evidence of students' engagement and performance through the social visualization interface.

© All rights reserved Hsiao et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Trattner, Christoph, Lin, Yi-Ling, Parra, Denis, Yue, Zhen, Real, William and Brusilovsky, Peter (2012): Evaluating tag-based information access in image collections. In: Proceedings of the 23rd ACM Conference on Hypertext and Social Media 2012. pp. 113-122.

The availability of social tags has greatly enhanced access to information. Tag clouds have emerged as a new "social" way to find and visualize information, providing both one-click access to information and a snapshot of the "aboutness" of a tagged collection. A range of research projects explored and compared different tag artifacts for information access ranging from regular tag clouds to tag hierarchies. At the same time, there is a lack of user studies that compare the effectiveness of different types of tag-based browsing interfaces from the users point of view. This paper contributes to the research on tag-based information access by presenting a controlled user study that compared three types of tag-based interfaces on two recognized types of search tasks -- lookup and exploratory search. Our results demonstrate that tag-based browsing interfaces significantly outperform traditional search interfaces in both performance and user satisfaction. At the same time, the differences between the two types of tag-based browsing interfaces explored in our study are not as clear.

© All rights reserved Trattner et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Cantador, Ivn, Brusilovsky, Peter and Kuflik, Tsvi (2011): Second workshop on information heterogeneity and fusion in recommender systems (HetRec2011). In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Conference on Recommender Systems 2011. pp. 387-388.

 
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Hsiao, I-Han, Bakalov, Fedor, Brusilovsky, Peter and Knig-Ries, Birgitta (2011): Open Social Student Modeling: Visualizing Student Models with Parallel IntrospectiveViews. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization 2011. pp. 171-182.

This paper explores a social extension of open student modeling that we call open social student modeling. We present a specific implementation of this approach that uses parallel IntrospectiveViews to visualize models representing student progress with QuizJET parameterized self-assessment questions for Java programming. The interface allows visualizing not only the student's own model, but also displaying parallel views on the models of their peers and the cumulative model of the entire class or group. The system was evaluated in a semester-long classroom study. While the use of the system was non-mandatory, the parallel IntrospectiveViews interface caused an increase in all of the usage parameters in comparison to a regular portal-based access, which allowed the student to achieve a higher success rate in answering the questions. The collected data offer some evidence that a combination of traditional personalized guidance with social guidance was more effective than personalized guidance alone.

© All rights reserved Hsiao et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Lin, Yi-Ling and Brusilovsky, Peter (2011): Towards Open Corpus Adaptive Hypermedia: A Study of Novelty Detection Approaches. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization 2011. pp. 353-358.

Classic adaptive hypermedia systems are able to track a user's knowledge of the subject and use it to evaluate the novelty and difficulty of content encountered by the user. Our goal is to implement this functionality in an open corpus context where a domain model is not available nor is the content indexed with domain concepts. We examine methods for novelty measurement based on automatic text analysis. To compare these methods, we use an evaluation approach based on knowledge encapsulated in the structure of a textbook. Our study shows that a knowledge accumulation method adopted from the domain of intelligent tutoring systems offers a more meaningful novelty measurement than methods adapted from the area of personalized information retrieval.

© All rights reserved Lin and Brusilovsky and/or their publisher

 
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Lee, Danielle H. and Brusilovsky, Peter (2011): Improving recommendations using WatchingNetworks in a social tagging system. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 33-39.

This paper aims to examine whether users' watching networks can improve collaborative filtering-based recommendations (CF). Watching networks are established by users upon their perceived usefulness or interests about other users' information collections. The networks do not require mutual agreement between a watching party and a watched party. The typical example of this network is 'following' in Twitter, 'watching' on CiteULike, or 'contacts' on Flickr. Once a user declares that 'I want to watch user A', the user A's information collection is displayed to the watching user, continuously. It can be interpreted to mean that a watching user found some shared interests in user A's collection and want to refer to it in future. The approaches explored in this paper take advantage of this watching network as a part of user's preferences for recommendations. To evaluate the potential of these approaches, we focus on a social tagging system, CiteULike. Our data shows that in this context, a hybrid recommendation approach that fuses CF and watching network-based recommendations outperforms both CF and network-based recommendations.

© All rights reserved Lee and Brusilovsky and/or ACM Press

 
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Ahn, Jae-wook and Brusilovsky, Peter (2011): Guiding educational resources for iSchool students with topic-based adaptive visualization. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 632-633.

Information visualizations can be applied to the educational domain in order to help the students access appropriate educational resources. We present a novel adaptive visualization method that supports navigations through class materials according to the lecture topics. The map-based adaptive annotations and the relevance-based visualizations are supported in the framework. We are going to use the system in a real iSchool class and will conduct a user study in order to validate the effectiveness of the idea.

© All rights reserved Ahn and Brusilovsky and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Fox, Edward A., Chen, Yinlin, Akbar, Monika, Shaffer, Clifford A., Edwards, Stephen H., Brusilovsky, Peter, Garcia, Dan, Delcambre, Lois, Decker, Felicia, Archer, David, Furuta, Richard, Shipman, Frank, Carpenter, Stephen and Cassel, Lillian (2010): Ensemble PDP-8: eight principles for distributed portals. In: JCDL10 Proceedings of the 2010 Joint International Conference on Digital Libraries 2010. pp. 341-344.

Ensemble, the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Pathways project for Computing, builds upon a diverse group of prior NSDL, DL-I, and other projects. Ensemble has shaped its activities according to principles related to design, development, implementation, and operation of distributed portals. Here we articulate 8 key principles for distributed portals (PDPs). While our focus is on education and pedagogy, we expect that our experiences will generalize to other digital library application domains. These principles inform, facilitate, and enhance the Ensemble R&D and production activities. They allow us to provide a broad range of services, from personalization to coordination across communities. The eight PDPs can be briefly summarized as: (1) Articulation across communities using ontologies. (2) Browsing tailored to collections. (3) Integration across interfaces and virtual environments. (4) Metadata interoperability and integration. (5) Social graph construction using logging and metrics. (6) Superimposed information and annotation integrated across distributed systems. (7) Streamlined user access with IDs. (8) Web 2.0 multiple social network system interconnection.

© All rights reserved Fox et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Carpenter, B. Stephen, Furuta, Richard, Shipman, Frank, Huie, Allison, Pogue, Daniel, Fox, Edward A., Lee, Spencer, Brusilovsky, Peter, Cassel, Lillian and Delcambre, Lois (2010): Multiple sources with multiple portals: a demonstration of the ensemble computing portal in second life. In: JCDL10 Proceedings of the 2010 Joint International Conference on Digital Libraries 2010. pp. 397-398.

This demonstration is an overview of our Ensemble pathway project with group members on-location at the conference and in the virtual world of Second Life from remote locations providing a live walk-through tour of our project online. This approach allows the demonstration to extend beyond the allocated conference session as a means to attract people to JCDL/ICADL.

© All rights reserved Carpenter et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Lee, Danielle H. and Brusilovsky, Peter (2010): Social networks and interest similarity: the case of CiteULike. In: Proceedings of the 21st ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia 2010. pp. 151-156.

In collaborative filtering recommender systems, there is little room for users to get involved in the choice of their peer group. It leaves users defenseless against various spamming or ''shilling'' attacks. Other social Web-based systems, however, allow users to self-select peers and build a social network. We argue that users' self-defined social networks could be valuable to increase the quality of recommendation in CF systems. To prove the feasibility of this idea we examined how similar are interests of users connected by self-defined relationships in a collaborative tagging systems Citeulike. Interest similarity was measured by similarity of items and meta-data they share and tags they use. Our study shows that users connected by social networks exhibit significantly higher similarity on all explored levels (items, meta-data, and tags) than non-connected users. This similarity is the highest for directly connected users and decreases with the increase of distance between users. Among other interesting properties of information sharing is the finding that between-user similarity in social connections on the level of metadata and tags is much larger than similarity on the level of items. Overall, our findings support the feasibility of social network based recommender systems and offer some good hints to the prospective authors of these systems.

© All rights reserved Lee and Brusilovsky and/or their publisher

 
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Chignell, Mark, Brusilovsky, Peter, Szigeti, Steve and Toms, Elaine (2010): Evaluating hypertext: the quantitative-qualitative quandary. In: Proceedings of the 21st ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia 2010. pp. 211-212.

This panel will examine issues regarding the evaluation of hypertext research. The panelists will begin by contrasting four different viewpoints on the role of evaluation in hypertext research. The discussion will then consider questions relating the what evaluation methods should be used and when.

© All rights reserved Chignell et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hsiao, I-Han, Brusilovsky, Peter, Yudelson, Michael and Ortigosa, Alvaro (2010): The value of adaptive link annotation in e-learning: a study of a portal-based approach. In: Proceedings of the 21st ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia 2010. pp. 223-228.

Adaptive link annotation is one of the most popular adaptive educational hypermedia techniques. It has been widely studied and demonstrated its ability to help students to acquire knowledge faster, improve learning outcomes, reduce navigation overhead, increase motivation, and encourage the beneficial non-sequential navigation. However, almost all studies of adaptive link annotation have been performed in the context of dedicated adaptive educational hypermedia systems. The role of this technique in the context of widely popular learning portals has not yet been demonstrated. In this paper, we attempt to fill this gap by investigating the value of adaptive navigation support embedded into the learning portal. We compare the effect of portal-based adaptive navigation support to both the effect of the adaptive navigation support in adaptive educational hypermedia systems and to non-adaptive learning portals.

© All rights reserved Hsiao et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Ahn, Jae-wook and Brusilovsky, Peter (2010): What you see is what you search: adaptive visual search framework for the web. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2010. pp. 1049-1050.

Information retrieval is one of the most popular information access methods for overcoming the information overload problem of the Web. However, its interaction model is still utilizing the old text-based ranked lists and static interaction algorithm. In this paper, we introduce our adaptive visualization approach for searching the Web, which we call Adaptive VIBE. It is an extended version of a reference point-based spatial visualization algorithm, and is designed to serve as a user interaction module for a personalized search system. Personalized search can incorporate dynamic user interests and different contexts, improving search results. When it is combined with adaptive visualization, it can encourage users to become involved in the search process more actively by exploring the information space and learning new facts for effective searching. In this paper, we introduce the rationale and functions of our adaptive visualization approach and discuss the approaches' potential to create a better search environment for the Web.

© All rights reserved Ahn and Brusilovsky and/or their publisher

 
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Hsiao, I-Han, Sosnovsky, Sergey A. and Brusilovsky, Peter (2010): Guiding students to the right questions: adaptive navigation support in an E-Learning system for Java programming. In J. Comp. Assisted Learning, 26 (4) pp. 270-283.

 
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Lee, Danielle H. and Brusilovsky, Peter (2010): Using self-defined group activities for improving recommendations in collaborative tagging systems. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Conference on Recommender Systems 2010. pp. 221-224.

This paper aims to combine information about users' self-defined social connections with traditional collaborative filtering (CF) to improve recommendation quality. Specifically, in the following, the users' social connections in consideration were groups. Unlike other studies which utilized groups inferred by data mining technologies, we used the information about the groups in which each user explicitly participated. The group activities are centered on common interests. People join a group to share and acquire information about a topic as a form of community of interest or practice. The information of this group activity may be a good source of information for the members. We tested whether adding the information from the users' own groups or group members to the traditional CF-based recommendations can improve the recommendation quality or not. The information about groups was combined with CF using a mixed hybridization strategy. We evaluated our approach in two ways, using the Citeulike data set and a real user study.

© All rights reserved Lee and Brusilovsky and/or ACM Press

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Cantador, Ivn, Koren, Yehuda, Kuflik, Tsvi and Weimer, Markus (2010): Workshop on information heterogeneity and fusion in recommender systems (HetRec 2010). In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Conference on Recommender Systems 2010. pp. 375-376.

 
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Ahn, Jae-wook and Brusilovsky, Peter (2010): Can Concept-Based User Modeling Improve Adaptive Visualization?. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization 2010. pp. 4-15.

Adaptive visualization can present user-adaptive information in such a way as to help users to analyze complicated information spaces easily and intuitively. We presented an approach called Adaptive VIBE, which extended the traditional reference point-based visualization algorithm, so that it could adaptively visualize documents of interest. The adaptive visualization was implemented by separating the effects of user models and queries within the document space and we were able to show the potential of the proposed idea. However, adaptive visualization still remained in the simple bag-of-words realm. The keywords used to construct the user models were not effective enough to express the concepts that need to be included in the user models. In this study, we tried to improve the old-fashioned keyword-only user models by adopting more concept-rich named-entities. The evaluation results show the strengths and shortcomings of using named-entities as conceptual elements for visual user models and the potential to improve the effectiveness of personalized information access systems.

© All rights reserved Ahn and Brusilovsky and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Bra, Paul De and Brusilovsky, Peter (2009): Introduction to Special Issue on Adaptive Hypermedia. In New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, 15 (1) pp. 1-3.

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Sosnovsky, Sergey and Yudelson, Michael (2009): Addictive links: the motivational value of adaptive link annotation. In New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, 15 (1) pp. 97-118.

Adaptive link annotation is a popular adaptive navigation support technology. Empirical studies of adaptive annotation in the educational context have demonstrated that it can help students to acquire knowledge faster, improve learning outcomes, reduce navigational overhead, and encourage non-sequential navigation. In this paper, we present our exploration of a lesser known effect of adaptive annotation, its ability to significantly increase students' motivation to work with non-mandatory educational content. We explored this effect and confirmed its significance in the context of two different adaptive hypermedia systems. The paper presents and discusses the results of our work.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Parra, Denis and Brusilovsky, Peter (2009): Collaborative filtering for social tagging systems: an experiment with CiteULike. In: Proceedings of the 2009 ACM Conference on Recommender Systems 2009. pp. 237-240.

Collaborative tagging systems pose new challenges to the developers of recommender systems. As observed by recent research, traditional implementations of classic recommender approaches, such as collaborative filtering, are not working well in this new context. To address these challenges, a number of research groups worldwide work on adapting these approaches to the specific nature of collaborative tagging systems. In joining this stream of research, we have developed and compared three variants of user-based collaborative filtering algorithms to provide recommendations of articles on CiteULike. The first approach, Classic Collaborative filtering (CCF) uses Pearson correlation to calculate similarity between users and a classic adjusted ratings formula to rank the recommendations. The second approach, Neighbor-weighted Collaborative Filtering, takes into account the number of raters in the ranking formula of the recommendations. The third approach explores an innovative way to form the user neighborhood based on a modified version of the Okapi BM25 model over users' tags. Our results suggest that both alterations of CCF are beneficial. Incorporating the number of raters into the algorithms leads to an improvement of precision, while tag-based BM25 can be considered as an alternative to Pearson correlation to calculate the similarity between users and their neighbors.

© All rights reserved Parra and Brusilovsky and/or ACM Press

 
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Farzan, Rosta and Brusilovsky, Peter (2009): Social Navigation Support for Information Seeking: If You Build It, Will They Come?. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization 2009. pp. 66-77.

Navigating through the ever-changing information space is becoming increasingly difficult. Social navigation support is a technique for guiding users to interesting and relevant information by leveraging the browsing behavior of past users. Effect of social navigation support on users' information seeking behavior has been studied mostly from conceptual basis or under natural experiments. In the current work, we have designed and conducted a controlled experiment to investigate the effect of social navigation support through a multifaceted method. This paper reports on the design of the study and the result of log data, subjective evaluation, and eye movement data analysis.

© All rights reserved Farzan and Brusilovsky and/or their publisher

 
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Lee, Danielle H. and Brusilovsky, Peter (2009): Reinforcing Recommendation Using Implicit Negative Feedback. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization 2009. pp. 422-427.

Recommender systems have explored a range of implicit feedback approaches to capture users' current interests and preferences without intervention of users' work. However, current research focuses mostly on implicit positive feedback. Implicit negative feedback is still a challenge because users mainly target information they want. There have been few studies assessing the value of negative implicit feedback. In this paper, we explore a specific approach to employ implicit negative feedback and assess whether it can be used to improve recommendation quality.

© All rights reserved Lee and Brusilovsky and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Ahn, Jae-wook, Brusilovsky, Peter, He, Daqing, Grady, Jonathan and Li, Qi (2008): Personalized web exploration with task models. In: Proceedings of the 17th international conference on World Wide Web 2008. pp. 1-10.

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Hsiao, I-Han and Yudelson, Michael V. (2008): Annotated program examples as first class objects in an educational digital library. In: JCDL08 Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2008. pp. 337-340.

This paper analyzes problems encountered by our team while creating an educational digital library of program examples. We present approaches to resolving these problems, and evaluations of the suggested approaches.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Farzan, Rosta and Brusilovsky, Peter (2008): Where did the researchers go?: supporting social navigation at a large academic. In: Proceedings of the Nineteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia 2008. pp. 203-212.

Dealing with the information overload is an important challenge. Over the last decade researchers have tried to tackle that problem using social technologies. We present a social information access system that helps researchers attending a large academic conference to plan talks they wish to attend. More specifically, we have tried to address the problem of collecting reliable feedback from the community of users. Following "do it for yourself" approach, the system encourages users to add interesting talks to their individual schedules and uses scheduling information for social navigation support. We also report results of evaluation of the system at the ELearn 2007 conference.

© All rights reserved Farzan and Brusilovsky and/or ACM Press

 
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Kim, Jae-Kyung, Farzan, Rosta and Brusilovsky, Peter (2008): Spatial annotation and social navigation support for electronic books. In: Proceedings of the Nineteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia 2008. pp. 233-234.

Modern efforts on digitizing electronic books focus on preserving authentic "spatial" representation of the original sources. The new format requires new tools to help users to access, process, and make sense of digital information. This paper presents an approach which assists users of these new "spatial" sources by giving them a combination of annotation and social navigation support. This approach is currently fully implemented and under evaluation in a classroom study.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Farzan, Rosta and Brusilovsky, Peter (2008): AnnotatEd: A social navigation and annotation service for web-based educational resources. In New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, 14 (1) pp. 3-32.

Web page annotation and adaptive navigation support are two active, but independent research directions focused on the same goal: expanding the functionality of the Web as a hypertext system. The goal of the AnnotatEd system presented in this paper has been to integrate annotation and adaptive navigation support into a single value-added service where the components can reinforce each other and create new unique attributes. This paper describes the implementation of AnnotatEd from early prototypes to the current version, which has been explored in several contexts. We summarize some lessons we learned during the development process and which defined the current functionality of the system. We also present the results of several classroom studies of the system. These results demonstrate the importance of the browsing-based information access supported by AnnotatEd and the value of both the annotation and navigation support functionalities offered by the system.

© All rights reserved Farzan and Brusilovsky and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Ahn, Jae-wook, Brusilovsky, Peter, He, Daqing, Grady, Jonathan and Li, Qi (2008): Personalized web exploration with task models. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2008. pp. 1-10.

Personalized Web search has emerged as one of the hottest topics for both the Web industry and academic researchers. However, the majority of studies on personalized search focused on a rather simple type of search, which leaves an important research topic -- the personalization in exploratory searches -- as an under-studied area. In this paper, we present a study of personalization in task-based information exploration using a system called TaskSieve. TaskSieve is a Web search system that utilizes a relevance feedback based profile, called a "task model", for personalization. Its innovations include flexible and user controlled integration of queries and task models, task-infused text snippet generation, and on-screen visualization of task models. Through an empirical study using human subjects conducting task-based exploration searches, we demonstrate that TaskSieve pushes significantly more relevant documents to the top of search result lists as compared to a traditional search system. TaskSieve helps users select significantly more accurate information for their tasks, allows the users to do so with higher productivity, and is viewed more favorably by subjects under several usability related characteristics.

© All rights reserved Ahn et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Freyne, Jill, Farzan, Rosta, Brusilovsky, Peter, Smyth, Barry and Coyle, Maurice (2007): Collecting community wisdom: integrating social search & social navigation. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2007. pp. 52-61.

The goal of this paper is to detail the integration of two "social Web" technologies -- social search and social navigation -- and to highlight the benefits of such integration on two levels. Firstly, both technologies harvest and harness "community wisdom" and in an integrated system each of the search and navigation components can benefit from the additional community wisdom gathered by the other when assisting users to locate relevant information. Secondly, by integrating search and browsing we facilitate the development of a unique interface that effectively blends search and browsing functionality as part of a seamless social information access service. This service allows users to effectively combine their search and browsing behaviors. In this paper we will argue that this integration provides significantly more than the simple sum of the parts.

© All rights reserved Freyne et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ahn, Jae-wook, Brusilovsky, Peter, Grady, Jonathan, He, Daqing and Syn, Sue Yeon (2007): Open user profiles for adaptive news systems: help or harm?. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2007. pp. 11-20.

Over the last five years, a range of projects have focused on progressively more elaborated techniques for adaptive news delivery. However, the adaptation process in these systems has become more complicated and thus less transparent to the users. In this paper, we concentrate on the application of open user models in adding transparency and controllability to adaptive news systems. We present a personalized news system, YourNews, which allows users to view and edit their interest profiles, and report a user study on the system. Our results confirm that users prefer transparency and control in their systems, and generate more trust to such systems. However, similar to previous studies, our study demonstrate that this ability to edit user profiles may also harm the system's performance and has to be used with caution.

© All rights reserved Ahn et al. and/or International World Wide Web Conference Committee

 
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Farzan, Rosta, Coyle, Maurice, Freyne, Jill, Brusilovsky, Peter and Smyth, Barry (2007): ASSIST: adaptive social support for information space traversal. In: Proceedings of the Eighteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia 2007. pp. 199-208.

Finding relevant information in a hyperspace has been a much studied problem for many years. With the emergence of so called Web 2.0 technologies we have seen the use of social systems for retrieval tasks increasing dramatically. Each system collects and exploits its own pool of community wisdom for the benefit of its users. In this paper we suggest a form of retrieval which exploits the pools of wisdom of multiple social technologies, specifically social search and social navigation. The paper details the added user benefits of merging several sources of social wisdom. We present details of the ASSIST engine developed to integrate social support mechanisms for the users of information repositories. The goal of this paper is to present the main features of the integrated community-based personalization engine that we have developed in order to improve retrieval in the hyperspace of information resources. It also reports the results of an empirical study of this technology.

© All rights reserved Farzan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ahn, Jae-wook and Brusilovsky, Peter (2007): From User Query to User Model and Back: Adaptive Relevance-Based Visualization for Information Foraging. In: 2007 IEEE / WIC / ACM International Conference on Web Intelligence WI 2007 2-5 November, 2007, Silicon Valley, CA, USA. pp. 706-712.

 
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Yudelson, Michael, Brusilovsky, Peter and Zadorozhny, Vladimir (2007): A User Modeling Server for Contemporary Adaptive Hypermedia: An Evaluation of the Push Approach to Evidence Propagation. In: Conati, Cristina, McCoy, Kathleen F. and Paliouras, Georgios (eds.) User Modeling 2007 - 11th International Conference - UM 2007 June 25-29, 2007, Corfu, Greece. pp. 27-36.

2006
 
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Mertens, Robert, Farzan, Rosta and Brusilovsky, Peter (2006): Social navigation in web lectures. In: Proceedings of the Seventeenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2006. pp. 41-44.

Web lectures are a form of educational content that differs from classic hypertext in a number of ways. Web lectures are easier to produce and therefore large amounts of material become accumulated in a short time. The recordings are significantly less structured than traditional web based learning content and they are time based media. Both the lack of structure and their time based nature pose difficulties for navigation in web lectures. The approach presented in this paper applies the basic concept of social navigation to facilitate navigation in web lectures. Social navigation support has been successfully employed for hypertext and picture augmented hypertext in the education domain. This paper describes how social navigation can be implemented for web lectures and how it can be used to augment existent navigation features.

© All rights reserved Mertens et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Loboda, Tomasz D. and Brusilovsky, Peter (2006): WADEIn II: adaptive explanatory visualization for expressions evaluation. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Software Visualization 2006. pp. 197-198.

Adaptive visualization and explanatory visualization have been suggested as two approaches to increasing the educational effectiveness of software visualization. This paper presents our work on the integration of adaptive and explanatory visualization. We introduce the motivation behind this research and describe how adaptive, explanatory visualization is implemented in WADEIn II, a system that visualizes the process of expression evaluation in the C programming language.

© All rights reserved Loboda and Brusilovsky and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Ramp, Ewald, Bra, Paul De and Brusilovsky, Peter (2005): High-level translation of adaptive hypermedia applications. In: Proceedings of the Sixteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2005. pp. 126-128.

In the early years of the adaptive hypermedia research a large number of special-purpose adaptive hypermedia systems (AHS) have been developed, to illustrate research ideas, or to serve a single application. Many of these systems are now obsolete. In this paper we propose to bring new life to these applications by means of translation to a general purpose adaptive hypermedia architecture. We illustrate that this approach can work by showing a high-level translation from InterBook [2] to AHA! [5]. Such a translation consists of three parts: the structure of concepts and concept relationships needs to be translated, the adaptive behavior for these concept relationships must be defined, and the layout and presentation of the source application must be "simulated". Our high-level translation covers all three parts.

© All rights reserved Ramp et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Farzan, Rosta and Ahn, Jae-wook (2005): Comprehensive personalized information access in an educational digital library. In: JCDL05: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2005. pp. 9-18.

This paper explores two ways to help students locate most relevant resources in educational digital libraries. One method gives a more comprehensive access to educational resources, through multiple pathways of information access, including browsing and information visualization. The second method is to access personalized information through social navigation support. This paper presents the details of the Knowledge Sea II system for comprehensive personalized access to educational resources and also presents the results of a classroom study. The study delivered a convincing argument for the importance of providing multiple information presentations modes, showing that only about 10% of all resource accesses were made through the traditional search interface. We have also collected some solid evidence in favor of the social navigation support.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Sosnovsky, Sergey A. and Shcherbinina, Olena (2005): User Modeling in a Distributed E-Learning Architecture. In: Ardissono, Liliana, Brna, Paul and Mitrovic, Antonija (eds.) User Modeling 2005 - 10th International Conference - UM 2005 July 24-29, 2005, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. pp. 387-391.

 
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Farzan, Rosta and Brusilovsky, Peter (2005): Social Navigation Support Through Annotation-Based Group Modeling. In: Ardissono, Liliana, Brna, Paul and Mitrovic, Antonija (eds.) User Modeling 2005 - 10th International Conference - UM 2005 July 24-29, 2005, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. pp. 463-472.

 
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Yudelson, Michael, Gavrilova, Tatiana and Brusilovsky, Peter (2005): Towards User Modeling Meta-ontology. In: Ardissono, Liliana, Brna, Paul and Mitrovic, Antonija (eds.) User Modeling 2005 - 10th International Conference - UM 2005 July 24-29, 2005, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. pp. 448-452.

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter and Higgins, Colin (2005): Preface to the special issue on automated assessment of programming assignments. In ACM Journal of Educational Resources in Computing, 5 (3) .

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter and Sosnovsky, Sergey A. (2005): Individualized exercises for self-assessment of programming knowledge: An evaluation of QuizPACK. In ACM Journal of Educational Resources in Computing, 5 (3) .

2004
 
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Brusilovsky, Peter (2004): Adaptive Navigation Support: From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web and Beyond. In Psychnology, 2 (1) pp. 7-23.

Adaptive navigation support is a specific group of technologies that support user navigation in "virtual spaces" adapting to the goals, preferences and knowledge of the individual user. These technologies, originally developed in the field of adaptive hypermedia, are becoming increasingly important in several adaptive Web applications from Web-based adaptive hypermedia to adaptive virtual reality. This paper provides a brief introduction to adaptive navigation support, reviews major adaptive navigation support technologies, and presents a sequence of projects performed by our group to study adaptive navigation support in different contexts.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky and/or Psychnology.Org

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter and Rizzo, Riccardo (2004): Accessing Web Educational Resources from Mobile Wireless Devices: The Knowledge Sea Approach. In: Crestani, Fabio, Dunlop, Mark D. and Mizzaro, Stefano (eds.) Mobile and Ubiquitous Information Access - Mobile HCI 2003 International Workshop September 8, 2004, Udine, Italy. pp. 54-66.

 
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Knapp, Judith, Gamper, Johann and Brusilovsky, Peter (2004): Multiple Use of Content in a Web-Based Language Learning System. In: Looi, Chee-Kit, Sutinen, Erkki, Sampson, Demetrios G., Aedo, Ignacio, Uden, Lorna and Khknen, Esko (eds.) ICALT 2004 - Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies 30 August - 1 September, 2004, Joensuu, Finland. .

 
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Yudelson, Michael, Brusilovsky, Peter and Sosnovsky, Sergey A. (2004): Accessing Interactive Examples with Adaptive Navigation Support. In: Looi, Chee-Kit, Sutinen, Erkki, Sampson, Demetrios G., Aedo, Ignacio, Uden, Lorna and Khknen, Esko (eds.) ICALT 2004 - Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies 30 August - 1 September, 2004, Joensuu, Finland. .

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter (2004): KnowledgeTree: a distributed architecture for adaptive e-learning. In: Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2004. pp. 104-113.

This paper presents KnowledgeTree, an architecture for adaptive E-Learning based on distributed reusable intelligent learning activities. The goal of KnowledgeTree is to bridge the gap between the currently popular approach to Web-based education, which is centered on learning management systems vs. the powerful but underused technologies in intelligent tutoring and adaptive hypermedia. This integrative architecture attempts to address both the component-based assembly of adaptive systems and teacher-level reusability.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky and/or ACM Press

2003
 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Corbett, Albert T. and Rosis, Fiorella De (eds.) User Modeling 2003 - 9th International Conference - UM 2003 June 22-26, 2003, Johnstown, PA, USA.

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter (2003): From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web. In: Szwillus, Gerd and Ziegler, Jrgen (eds.) Mensch and Computer 2003 September 7-10, 2003, Stuttgart, Germany. .

2002
 
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Brusilovsky, Peter and Rizzo, R. (2002): Map-based horizontal navigation in educational Hypertext. In: Hypertext'02 - Proceedings of the Thirteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia June 11-15, 2002, College Park, Maryland, USA. p. 10.

This paper discusses the problem of horizontal (non-hierarchical) navigation in modern educational courseware. We will look at why horizontal links disappear, how to support horizontal navigation in modern hyper-courseware, and our earlier attempts to provide horizontal navigation in Web-based electronic textbooks. Here, we present map-based navigation -- a new approach to support horizontal navigation in open corpus educational courseware that we are currently investigating. We will describe the mechanism behind this approach, present a system KnowledgeSea that implements this approach, and provide some results of a classroom study of this system.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky and Rizzo and/or ACM Press

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter and Cooper, David W. (2002): Domain, task, and user models for an adaptive hypermedia performance support system. In: Gil, Yolanda and Leake, David (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2002 January 13-16, 2002, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 23-30.

Electronic Performance Support Systems (EPSS) is a challenging application area for developing intelligent interfaces. Some possible scenarios for using domain, task, and user models for adaptive performance support were explored in the context of the Adaptive Diagnostics and Personalized Technical Support (ADAPTS) project. ADAPTS provides an intelligent, adaptive EPSS for maintaining complex equipment.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky and Cooper and/or ACM Press

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter and Rizzo, Riccardo (2002): Using Maps and Landmarks for Navigation Between Closed and Open Corpus Hypermedia in Web-based Education. In New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, 8 pp. 59-82.

This paper focuses on the problem of building links from closed to open corpus Web pages in the context of Web-based education. As a possible solution it introduces landmark-based navigation using semantic information space maps - an approach that we are currently investigating. The technical part of the paper presents a system Knowledge Sea that implements this approach, describes the mechanism behind the system, and reports some results of a classroom evaluation of this system.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky and Rizzo and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter and Rizzo, Riccardo (2002): Map-Based Access to Multiple Educational On-Line Resources from Mobile Wireless Devices. In: Paterno, Fabio (ed.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - 4th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2002 September 18-20, 2002, Pisa, Italy. pp. 404-408.

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter and Maybury, Mark T. (2002): From adaptive hypermedia to the adaptive web. In Communications of the ACM, 45 (5) pp. 30-33.

2001
 
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Brusilovsky, Peter (2001): Maximizing educational opportunity for every type of learner: adaptive hypermedia for web-based education. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) HCI International 2001 - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 5-10, 2001, New Orleans, USA. pp. 68-72.

1999
 
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Bra, Paul De, Brusilovsky, Peter, Eklund, John, Hall, Wendy and Kobsa, Alfred (1999): Adaptive Hypermedia: Purpose, Methods, and Techniques. In: Hypertext 99 - Proceedings of the Tenth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia February 21-25, 1999, Darmstadt, Germany. pp. 199-200.

1998
 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Milosavljevic, Maria, Tudhope, Douglas and Cunliffe, Daniel (1998): Editorial. In New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, 4 pp. 1-10.

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Kobsa, Alfred and Vassileva, Julita (eds.) (1998): Adaptive Hypertext and Hypermedia. Kluwer Academic Publishers

1997
 
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Brusilovsky, Peter (1997): A Knowledge-Based Approach to Creating Adaptive Electronic Textbooks. In: Smith, Michael J., Salvendy, Gavriel and Koubek, Richard J. (eds.) HCI International 1997 - Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Volume 2 August 24-29, 1997, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 107-110.

1993
 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Pesin, Leonid and Zyryanov, Mikhail (1993): Towards an Adaptive Hypermedia Component for an Intelligent Learning Environment. In: East-West International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Proceedings of the EWHCI93 1993. pp. 27-38.

This paper discusses the problem of integration of hypermedia and Intelligent Learning Environments (ILEs) technologies and the problem of creating an adaptive hypermedia component for ILEs. Our experience of creating an adaptive on-line help facilities for ITEM/IP system is described. This experience forms a background for our hypermedia work and provides some good ideas for it. We also present our approach to integration of a hypermedia component into internal structure of ILE and illustrate it with two examples of adaptive hypermedia components for the most recent versions of our ILEs ISIS-Tutor and ITEM/PG. Finally, we summarize main features of this approach, provide some references to related works, and consider some issues of adaptive hypermedia in general.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky et al. and/or Intl. Centre for Scientific And Technical Information

 
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Brusilovsky, Peter, Burmistrov, Ivan and Kaptelinin, Victor (1993): Structuring the Field of HCI: An Empirical Study of Expert Representations. In: East-West International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Proceedings of the EWHCI93 1993. pp. 18-28.

In this paper we present results of empirical study of HCI field based on the free sorting technique with subsequent cluster analysis. Eight proven HCI experts participated in the study proposing classifications of papers presented at the EWHCI'92 conference. The results showed satisfactory degree of consensus between the experts and high level of interpretability of group data. Some important findings are discussed. The results of our study could be useful for HCI conference organizers in their activity on arrangement of papers to special conference sessions.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky et al. and/or Intl. Centre for Scientific And Technical Information

1992
 
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Brusilovsky, Peter (1992): Adaptive Visualization in an Intelligent Programming Environment. In: East-West International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Proceedings of the EWHCI92 1992. pp. 46-50.

Program visualization is a useful tool for a programming learning environment. An adaptive visualization tool should visualize at the given moment of learning those language features only, that are new for the given student. In this paper we suggest how to use the student's current state of knowledge, represented in the form of the student model, to organize an adaptive program visualization. We describe the system ITEM/IP, which supports adaptive program visualization for any language teaching order preferred by the teacher or the student.

© All rights reserved Brusilovsky and/or Intl. Centre for Scientific And Technical Information

1991
 
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Brusilovskaya, V. G. and Brusilovsky, Peter (1991): Window-Based User Interface for the Computer Learning Environment. In: First Moscow International HCI91 Workshop Proceedings 1991. pp. 331-334.

In this paper one of possible approaches to interface design for computer learning environment is discussed. Computer environment provides a student with a computer laboratory for exploratory learning in the domain studying. To design the interface for learning environment the paradigm which regards environment as a set of instruments was adopted. For each instrument a certain type of window is created. Every type of window implements a certain function, one of possible views on the domain, one of possible domain investigation means. Such functional window-based user interface enables one to consider entire environment as a "bag with instruments". In this paper the environment for studying the foreign language lexicon is considered to be an example of learning environment. The system supplies windows of different types such as "a word with translation", "a view into dictionary", "a buffer", "morphological analysis", etc. The future development of this environment is also discussed.

© All rights reserved Brusilovskaya and Brusilovsky and/or Intl. Centre for Scientific And Technical Information

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/peter_brusilovsky.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2012
Pub. count:63
Number of co-authors:77



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Rosta Farzan:9
Jae-wook Ahn:8
I-Han Hsiao:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Peter Brusilovsky's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Edward A. Fox:109
Barry Smyth:61
Richard Furuta:60
 
 
 

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