Publication statistics

Pub. period:1990-2008
Pub. count:6
Number of co-authors:4



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Bruce Thomas:2
Bruce H. Thomas:2
Brett Wilkinson:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Paul Calder's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Bruce H. Thomas:54
Bruce Thomas:14
Mark A. Linton:8
 
 
 

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Paul Calder

 

Publications by Paul Calder (bibliography)

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2008
 
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Wilkinson, Brett and Calder, Paul (2008): Investigating touch interactions for an augmented world. In: Proceedings of OZCHI08 - the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 25-32. Available online

Touch screen interaction usually requires the user to view the input surface in order to make their selections. When the interaction platform is purposefully occluded to allow for natural interaction with an augmented reality (AR) system new issues are raised in regard to the usability of the touch sensitive interface. This paper details a user evaluation scenario that we have conducted looking at pen-based selection techniques for a personal, light-weight AR system and introduces a trial for manipulation testing that we are currently conducting. By testing various techniques we are identifying a combination of operations that will enable effective and usable communication with an unobtrusive, mobile AR system.

© All rights reserved Wilkinson and Calder and/or their publisher

2001
 
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Thomas, Bruce H. and Calder, Paul (2001): Applying cartoon animation techniques to graphical user interfaces. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 8 (3) pp. 198-222. Available online

If judiciously applied, animation techniques can enhance the look and feel of computer applications that present a graphical human interface. Such techniques can smooth the rough edges and abrupt transitions common in many current graphical interfaces, and strengthen the illusion of direct manipulation that many interfaces strive to present. To date, few applications include such animation techniques. One possible reason is that animated interfaces are difficult to implement: they are difficult to design, place great burdens on programmers, and demand high-performance from underlying graphics systems. This article describes how direct manipulation human computer interfaces can be augmented with techniques borrowed from cartoon animators. In particular, we wish to improve the visual feedback of a direct manipulation interface by smoothing the changes of an interface, giving manipulated objects a feeling of substance and providing cues that anticipate the result of a manipulation. Our approach is to add support for animation techniques such as object distortion and keyframe interpolation, and to provide prepackaged animation effects such as animated widgets for common user interface interactions. To determine if these tools and techniques are practical and effective, we built a prototype direct manipulation drawing editor with an animated interface and used the prototype editor to carry out a set of human factors experiments. The experiments show that the techniques are practical even on standard workstation hardware, and that the effects can indeed enhance direct manipulation interfaces.

© All rights reserved Thomas and Calder and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Thomas, Bruce H. and Calder, Paul (1995): Animating Direct Manipulation Interfaces. In: Robertson, George G. (ed.) Proceedings of the 8th annual ACM symposium on User interface and software technology November 15 - 17, 1995, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. pp. 3-12. Available online

If judiciously applied, the techniques of cartoon animation can enhance the illusion of direct manipulation that many human computer interfaces strive to present. In particular, animation can convey a feeling of substance in the objects that a user manipulates, strengthening the sense that real work is being done. This paper suggests some techniques that application programmers can use to animate direct manipulation interfaces, and it describes tools that programmers can use to easily incorporate the effects into their code. Our approach is based on suggesting a range of animation effects by distorting the view of the manipulated object. To explore the idea, we added a warping transformation capability to the InterViews user interface toolkit and used the new transformation to build a simple drawing editor that uses animated feedback. The editor demonstrates the effectiveness of the animation for simple operations, and it shows that the technique is practical even on standard workstation hardware.

© All rights reserved Thomas and Calder and/or ACM Press

 
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Thomas, Bruce and Calder, Paul (1995): Animated Interaction for a Graphical Editor. In: Proceedings of OZCHI95, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1995. pp. 191-196.

If judiciously applied, the techniques of cartoon animation can enhance the illusion of direct manipulation that many human computer interfaces strive to present. In particular, animation can convey a feeling of substance in the objects that a user manipulates, strengthening the sense that real work is being done. This paper describes some techniques we have used to animate interaction with a graphical editor. Our approach is based on suggesting a range of animation effects by distorting the shape of the manipulated object. The editor demonstrates the effectiveness of the animation for simple operations, and it shows that the technique is practical even on standard workstation hardware.

© All rights reserved Thomas and Calder and/or Ergonomics Society of Australia

1994
 
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Thomas, Bruce and Calder, Paul (1994): An Animated Widget Kit for InterViews. In: Proceedings of OZCHI94, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1994. pp. 203-208.

We have applied animation techniques to enhance the look and feel of the components created by the InterViews widget kit. We modified the kit in two ways: we added animation effects to standard widgets, and we introduced new kinds of widgets that show how animation can enrich the repertoire of available components. This paper shows how the new and modified widgets work. In particular, we describe smoothly growing and rotating menus, buttons that use geometric transformations to suggest movement, and effects based on flip-book animations. We finish with brief comments on some of the implementation issues that arose in this work.

© All rights reserved Thomas and Calder and/or Ergonomics Society of Australia

1990
 
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Calder, Paul and Linton, Mark A. (1990): Glyphs: Flyweight Objects for User Interfaces. In: Hudson, Scott E. (ed.) Proceedings of the 3rd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology October 03 - 05, 1990, Snowbird, Utah, United States. pp. 92-101.

Current user interface toolkits provide components that are complex and expensive. Programmers cannot use these components for many kinds of application data because the resulting implementation would be awkward and inefficient. We have defined a set of small, simple components, called glyphs, that programmers can use in large numbers to build user interfaces. To show that glyphs are simple and efficient, we have implemented a WYSIWYG document editor. The editor's performance is comparable to that of similar editors built with current tools, but its implementation is much simpler. We used the editor to create and print this paper.

© All rights reserved Calder and and/or ACM Press

 
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