Publication statistics

Pub. period:1993-2012
Pub. count:37
Number of co-authors:39



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Pranav Mistry:7
Marcelo Coelho:5
Enrico Costanza:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Pattie Maes's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Hiroshi Ishii:111
Henry Lieberman:64
 
 
 

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Pattie Maes

Ph.D

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Personal Homepage:
http://web.media.mit.edu/~pattie/

Current place of employment:
MIT Media Lab's

Pattie Maes is a professor in MIT's Program in Media Arts and Sciences. She founded and directs the Media Lab's Fluid Interfaces group. Previously, she founded and ran the Software Agents group. She currently acts as the associate Department Head for the Media, Arts and Sciences Department. Prior to joining the Media Lab, Maes was a visiting professor and a research scientist at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab. She holds bachelor's and PhD degrees in computer science from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium. Her areas of expertise are human-computer interaction, intelligent interfaces and ubiquitous computing. Maes is the editor of three books, and is an editorial board member and reviewer for numerous professional journals and conferences. She has received several awards: Newsweek magazine named her one of the "100 Americans to watch for" in the year 2000; TIME Digital selected her as a member of the Cyber-Elite, the top 50 technological pioneers of the high-tech world; the World Economic Forum honored her with the title "Global Leader for Tomorrow"; Ars Electronica awarded her the 1995 World Wide Web category prize; and in 2000 she was recognized with the "Lifetime Achievement Award" by the Massachusetts Interactive Media Council.

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Publications by Pattie Maes (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Heun, Valentin, Kapri, Anette von and Maes, Pattie (2012): Perifoveal display: combining foveal and peripheral vision in one visualization. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 1150-1155.

The Perifoveal Display (see Figure 1) is a visualization display for complex, real-time, dynamic data such as stock market data, traffic or control room as well as virtual 3D environments. The system takes advantage of the unique properties of the human perceptive system, which is capable of perceiving a high degree of detail in the foveal area, but has a unique more subliminal type of perception of movement and brightness in the peripheral area. The Perifoveal Display varies how data is visualized based on the user's viewing direction. Data in the center of the user's focus is displayed in a lot of detail. Movement and change in brightness as well as amount of detail and size highlight important data changes that fall into the periphery. The results of our user study show that the system is able to support the user while observing complex data.

© All rights reserved Heun et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Mistry, Pranav, Nanayakkara, Suranga and Maes, Pattie (2011): SPARSH: touch the cloud. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 585-586.

SPARSH presents a seamless way of passing data among multiple users and devices. The user touches a data item they wish to copy from a device, conceptually saving it in the user's body. Next, the user touches the other device they want to paste/pass the saved content. SPARSH uses touch-based interactions as indications for what to copy and where to pass it. Technically, the actual transfer of media happens via the information cloud. Accompanying video shows some of the SPARSH scenarios.

© All rights reserved Mistry et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mistry, Pranav, Nanayakkara, Suranga and Maes, Pattie (2011): SPARSH: passing data using the body as a medium. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 689-692.

SPARSH explores a novel interaction method to seamlessly transfer data among multiple users and devices in a fun and intuitive way. The user touches a data item they wish to copy from a device, conceptually saving in the user's body. Next, the user touches the other device they want to paste/pass the saved content. SPARSH uses touch-based interactions as indications for what to copy and where to pass it. Technically, the actual transfer of media happens via the information cloud.

© All rights reserved Mistry et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hunter, Seth, Maes, Pattie, Scott, Stacey and Kaufman, Henry (2011): MemTable: an integrated system for capture and recall of shared histories in group workspaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3305-3314.

This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of an interactive tabletop system that supports co-located meeting capture and asynchronous search and review of past meetings. The goal of the project is to evaluate the design of a conference table that augments the everyday work patterns of small collaborative groups by incorporating an integrated annotation system. We present a holistic design that values hardware ergonomics, supports heterogeneous input modalities, generates a memory of all user interactions, and provides access to historical data on and off the table. We present a user evaluation that assesses the usefulness of the input modalities and software features, and validates the effectiveness of the MemTable system as a tool for assisting memory recall.

© All rights reserved Hunter et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mistry, Pranav, Nanayakkara, Suranga and Maes, Pattie (2011): Touch and copy, touch and paste. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1095-1098.

SPARSH explores a novel interaction method to seamlessly transfer data between digital devices in a fun and intuitive way. The user touches whatever data item he or she wants to copy from a device. At that moment, the data item is conceptually saved in the user. Next, the user touches the other device he or she wants to pastepass the saved content into. SPARSH uses touch-based interactions as indications for what to copy and where to pass it. Technically, the actual transfer of media happens via the information cloud.

© All rights reserved Mistry et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mistry, Pranav and Maes, Pattie (2011): Mouseless: a computer mouse as small as invisible. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1099-1104.

Mouseless is a novel input device that provides the familiarity of interaction of a physical computer mouse without requiring a real hardware mouse. It consists of an IR laser beam and an IR camera, both of which are embedded in a computer. Mouseless proposes a number of novel additional gestural interactions while supporting all the conventional computer mouse interactions. In this short paper, we present the design and implementation of various Mouseless prototype systems.

© All rights reserved Mistry and Maes and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Linder, Natan and Maes, Pattie (2010): LuminAR: portable robotic augmented reality interface design and prototype. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 395-396.

In this paper we introduce LuminAR: a prototype for a new portable and compact projector-camera system designed to use the traditional incandescent bulb interface as a power source, and a robotic desk lamp that carries it, enabling it with dynamic motion capabilities. We are exploring how the LuminAR system embodied in a familiar form factor of a classic Angle Poise lamp may evolve into a new class of robotic, digital information devices.

© All rights reserved Linder and Maes and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Zoran, Amit, Coppiardi, Marco, Aguilera, Paula and Maes, Pattie (2009): Physical heart in a virtual body. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3523-3524.

In this video we present a special guitar that combines physical acoustic properties with virtual capabilities. A wooden resonator -- a unique, replaceable piece of wood that gives the guitar a unique acoustic sound, will embody the acoustical values. The acoustic signal created by this wooden heart will be digitally processed in a virtual sound box in order to create flexible sound design. The project shows that traditional values can be embedded into a digital object.

© All rights reserved Zoran et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Coelho, Marcelo, Hall, Lyndl, Berzowska, Joanna and Maes, Pattie (2009): Pulp-based computing: a framework for building computers out of paper. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3527-3528.

In this video, we describe a series of techniques for building sensors, actuators and circuit boards that behave, look, and feel like paper. By embedding electro-active inks, conductive threads and smart materials directly into paper during the papermaking process, we have developed seamless composites that are capable of supporting new and unexpected application domains in ubiquitous and pervasive computing at affordable costs.

© All rights reserved Coelho et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mistry, Pranav, Maes, Pattie and Chang, Liyan (2009): WUW -- wear Ur world: a wearable gestural interface. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4111-4116.

Information is traditionally confined to paper or digitally to a screen. In this paper, we introduce WUW, a wearable gestural interface, which attempts to bring information out into the tangible world. By using a tiny projector and a camera mounted on a hat or coupled in a pendant like wearable device, WUW sees what the user sees and visually augments surfaces or physical objects the user is interacting with. WUW projects information onto surfaces, walls, and physical objects around us, and lets the user interact with the projected information through natural hand gestures, arm movements or interaction with the object itself.

© All rights reserved Mistry et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Coelho, Marcelo, Poupyrev, Ivan, Sadi, Sajid, Vertegaal, Roel, Berzowska, Joanna, Buechley, Leah, Maes, Pattie and Oxman, Neri (2009): Programming reality: from transitive materials to organic user interfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4759-4762.

Over the past few years, a quiet revolution has been redefining our fundamental computing technologies. Flexible E-Ink, OLED displays, shape-changing materials, parametric design, e-textiles, sensor networks, and intelligent interfaces promise to spawn entirely new user experiences that will redefine our relationship with technology. This workshop invites researchers and practitioners to imagine and debate this future, exploring two converging themes. Transitive Materials focuses on how emerging materials and computationally-driven behaviors can operate in unison blurring the boundaries between form and function, human body and environment, structures and membranes. Organic User Interfaces (OUI) explores future interactive designs and applications as these materials become commonplace.

© All rights reserved Coelho et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Coelho, Marcelo and Maes, Pattie (2009): Shutters: a permeable surface for environmental control and communication. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 13-18.

 
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Mistry, Pranav and Maes, Pattie (2009): SixthSense: a wearable gestural interface. In: Oda, Yuko and Tanaka, Mariko (eds.) International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH ASIA 2009, Yokohama, Japan, December 16-19, 2009, Art Gallery and Emerging Technologies Adaptation 2009. p. 85.

 Cited in the following chapter:

3D User Interfaces: [/encyclopedia/3d_user_interfaces.html]


 
2008
 
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Wright, Alyssa, Maes, Pattie and Ishii, Hiroshi (2008): Social resonance: balancing reputation with tangible design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3387-3392.

New forms of tangible systems can be designed to leverage the strengths, and bridge the discrepancies, of reputation systems. This paper presents the ongoing design of a tangible reputation system, Social Resonance, that uses a wearable device to merge face-to-face interaction with online networking. Like its virtual counterparts, this system aims to make explicit the perspective of anonymous actors. Yet unlike online reputations, this system is negotiated through real-world action and signals. We present an overview of the system, including potential opportunities and related work, and conclude with future steps for analysis.

© All rights reserved Wright et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Coelho, Marcelo, Ishii, Hiroshi and Maes, Pattie (2008): Surflex: a programmable surface for the design of tangible interfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3429-3434.

In this paper we describe Surflex, a programmable surface for the design and visualization of physical forms. Surflex combines the physical properties of shape-memory alloy and foam to create a surface that can be electronically controlled to deform and gain new shapes. We describe implementation details, the possibilities enabled by the use of smart materials and soft mechanics in human computer interaction, as well as future applications for this technology.

© All rights reserved Coelho et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mistry, Pranav and Maes, Pattie (2008): Intelligent sticky notes that can be searched, located and can send reminders and messages. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2008. pp. 425-426.

We present 'Quickies: Intelligent Sticky Notes', an attempt to bring one of the most useful inventions of the 20th century into the digital age: the ubiquitous sticky notes. Sticky notes help us manage our-to-do lists, tag our objects and documents and capture short reminders or information that we may need in the near future. 'Quickies' enrich the experience of using sticky notes by allowing them to be tracked and managed more effectively. Quickies are stickies that have intelligence and the ability to remind us about the task we ought to perform or to provide us at the right time with the information we captured in the past. The project explores how the use of Artificial Intelligence, RFID, and ink recognition technologies can make it possible to create intelligent sticky notes that can be searched, located, can send reminders and messages, and more broadly, can help us to seamlessly connect our physical and digital experiences.

© All rights reserved Mistry and Maes and/or ACM Press

 
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Coelho, Marcelo and Maes, Pattie (2008): Sprout I/O: a texturally rich interface. In: Schmidt, Albrecht, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Hoven, Elise van den, Mazalek, Ali, Holleis, Paul and Villar, Nicolas (eds.) TEI 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 18-20, 2008, Bonn, Germany. pp. 221-222.

2007
 
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Costanza, Enrico, Inverso, Samuel A., Allen, Rebecca and Maes, Pattie (2007): Intimate interfaces in action: assessing the usability and subtlety of emg-based motionless gestures. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 819-828.

Mobile communication devices, such as mobile phones and networked personal digital assistants (PDAs), allow users to be constantly connected and communicate anywhere and at any time, often resulting in personal and private communication taking place in public spaces. This private -- public contrast can be problematic. As a remedy, we promote intimate interfaces: interfaces that allow subtle and minimal mobile interaction, without disruption of the surrounding environment. In particular, motionless gestures sensed through the electromyographic (EMG) signal have been proposed as a solution to allow subtle input in a mobile context. In this paper we present an expansion of the work on EMG-based motionless gestures including (1) a novel study of their usability in a mobile context for controlling a realistic, multimodal interface and (2) a formal assessment of how noticeable they are to informed observers. Experimental results confirm that subtle gestures can be profitably used within a multimodal interface and that it is difficult for observers to guess when someone is performing a gesture, confirming the hypothesis of subtlety.

© All rights reserved Costanza et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Merrill, David, Kalanithi, Jeevan and Maes, Pattie (2007): Siftables: towards sensor network user interfaces. In: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2007. pp. 75-78.

This paper outlines Siftables, a novel platform that applies technology and methodology from wireless sensor networks to tangible user interfaces in order to yield new possibilities for human-computer interaction. Siftables are compact devices with sensing, graphical display, and wireless communication. They can be physically manipulated as a group to interact with digital information and media. We discuss the unique affordances that a sensor network user interface (SNUI) such as Siftables provides, as well as the resulting directness between the physical interface and the data being manipulated. We conclude with a description of some gestural language primitives that we are currently prototyping with Siftables.

© All rights reserved Merrill et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sadi, Sajid and Maes, Pattie (2007): Meta-Modelling, Visual Languages, Graph Transformation, Operational Semantics. In: VL-HCC 2007 - IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing 23-27 September, 2007, Coeur dAlene, Idaho, USA. pp. 171-174.

 
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Merrill, David and Maes, Pattie (2007): Augmenting Looking, Pointing and Reaching Gestures to Enhance the Searching and Browsing of Physical Objects. In: LaMarca, Anthony, Langheinrich, Marc and Truong, Khai N. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2007 - Pervasive Computing 5th International Conference May 13-16, 2007, Toronto, Canada. pp. 1-18.

2006
 
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Costanza, Enrico, Inverso, Samuel A., Pavlov, Elan, Allen, Rebecca and Maes, Pattie (2006): eye-q: eyeglass peripheral display for subtle intimate notifications. In: Proceedings of 8th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2006. pp. 211-218.

Mobile devices are generally used in public, where the user is surrounded by others not involved in the interaction. Audible notification cues are often a cause of unnecessary disruption and distraction both for co-located people and even for the user to whom they are directed. We present a wearable peripheral display embedded in eyeglasses that delivers subtle, discreet and unobtrusive cues. The display is personal and intimate; it delivers visual cues in the wearers' periphery without disrupting their immediate environment. A user study conducted to validate the design reveals that the display is effective and subtle in notifying users. Experimental results show, with significance, that the cues can be designed to meet specific levels of visibility and disruption for the wearer, so that some cues are less noticeable when the user is not under high workload, which is highly desirable in many practical circumstances. Hence, peripheral notification displays can provide an effective solution for designing socially acceptable notification displays, unobtrusive to the user and the immediate environment.

© All rights reserved Costanza et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Costanza, Enrico, Inverso, Samuel A., Pavlov, Elan, Allen, Rebecca and Maes, Pattie (2006): eye-q: eyeglass peripheral display for subtle intimate notifications. In: Nieminen, Marko and Rykkee, Mika (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006 September 12-15, 2006, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 211-218.

2005
 
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Maes, Pattie (2005): Attentive objects: enriching people's natural interaction with everyday objects. In Interactions, 12 (4) pp. 45-48.

2004
 
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Liu, Hugo and Maes, Pattie (2004): What would they think?: a computational model of attitudes. In: Nunes, Nuno Jardim and Rich, Charles (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2004 January 13-16, 2004, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal. pp. 38-45.

A key to improving at any task is frequent feedback from people whose opinions we care about: our family, friends, mentors, and the experts. However, such input is not usually available from the right people at the time it is needed most, and attaining a deep understanding of someone else's perspective requires immense effort. This paper introduces a technological solution. We present a novel method for automatically modeling a person's attitudes and opinions, and a proactive interface called "What Would They Think?" which offers the just-in-time perspectives of people whose opinions we care about, based on whatever the user happens to be reading or writing. In the application, each person is represented by a "digital persona," generated from an automated analysis of personal texts (e.g. weblogs and papers written by the person being modeled) using natural language processing and commonsense-based textual-affect sensing. In user studies, participants using our application were able to grasp the personalities and opinions of a panel of strangers more quickly and deeply than with either of two baseline methods. We discuss the theoretical and pragmatic implications of this research to intelligent user interfaces.

© All rights reserved Liu and Maes and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Zacharia, Giorgos, Moukas, Alexandros, Boufounos, Petros and Maes, Pattie (2000): Dynamic Pricing in a Reputation Brokered Agent Mediated Knowledge Marketplace. In: HICSS 2000 2000. .

1999
 
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Wexelblat, Alan and Maes, Pattie (1999): Footprints: History-Rich Tools for Information Foraging. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 270-277.

Inspired by Hill and Hollan's original work [7], we have been developing a theory of interaction history and building tools to apply this theory to navigation in a complex information space. We have built a series of tools -- map, paths, annotations and signposts -- based on a physical-world navigation metaphor. These tools have been in use for over a year. Our user study involved a controlled browse task and showed that users were able to get the same amount of work done with significantly less effort.

© All rights reserved Wexelblat and Maes and/or ACM Press

 
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Dyke, Neil W. Van, Lieberman, Henry and Maes, Pattie (1999): Butterfly: A Conversation-Finding Agent for Internet Relay Chat. In: Maybury, Mark T. (ed.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1999 January 5-8, 1999, Redondo Beach, California, USA. pp. 39-41.

The Internet enables groups of people throughout the world to interact to discuss issues, get assistance, learn, and socialize. However, when there are thousands of loosely defined groups in which a user could potentially participate, the problem becomes finding the groups of most interest. In this paper we focus on the domain of Internet Relay Chat real-time text messaging, and describe a "social butterfly" agent called Butterfly that samples available conversational groups and recommends ones of interest. We discuss Butterfly's motivation, usage, real-world design constraints, implementation, and results. Finally, we introduce work in progress on a multi-agent approach that has grown out of our experience with Butterfly.

© All rights reserved Dyke et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Zacharia, Giorgos, Moukas, Alexandros and Maes, Pattie (1999): Collaborative Reputation Mechanisms in Electronic Marketplaces. In: HICSS 1999 1999. .

 
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Maes, Pattie, Guttman, Robert H. and Moukas, Alexandros (1999): Agents That Buy and Sell. In Communications of the ACM, 42 (3) pp. 81-91.

1997
 
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Shneiderman, Ben and Maes, Pattie (1997): Direct Manipulation vs Interface Agents. In Interactions, 4 (6) pp. 42-61.

 
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Maes, Pattie (1997): Intelligent Software. In: Moore, Johanna D., Edmonds, Ernest and Puerta, Angel R. (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1997 January 6-9, 1997, Orlando, Florida, USA. pp. 41-43.

 
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Maes, Pattie (1997): On Software Agents: Humanizing the Global Computer (Interview). In IEEE Internet Computing, 1 (4) pp. 10-19.

1995
 
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Shardanand, Upendra and Maes, Pattie (1995): Social Information Filtering: Algorithms for Automating "Word of Mouth". In: Katz, Irvin R., Mack, Robert L., Marks, Linn, Rosson, Mary Beth and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 95 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 7-11, 1995, Denver, Colorado. pp. 210-217.

This paper describes a technique for making personalized recommendations from any type of database to a user based on similarities between the interest profile of that user and those of other users. In particular, we discuss the implementation of a networked system called Ringo, which makes personalized recommendations for music albums and artists. Ringo's database of users and artists grows dynamically as more people use the system and enter more information. Four different algorithms for making recommendations by using social information filtering were tested and compared. We present quantitative and qualitative results obtained from the use of Ringo by more than 2000 people.

© All rights reserved Shardanand and Maes and/or ACM Press

 
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Maes, Pattie (1995): Artificial Life Meets Entertainment: Lifelike Autonomous Agents. In Communications of the ACM, 38 (11) pp. 108-114.

1994
 
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Maes, Pattie (1994): Agents that Reduce Work and Information Overload. In Communications of the ACM, 37 (7) pp. 30-40.

1993
 
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Kozierok, Robyn and Maes, Pattie (1993): A Learning Interface Agent for Scheduling Meetings. In: Gray, Wayne D., Hefley, William and Murray, Dianne (eds.) International Workshop on Intelligent User Interfaces 1993 January 4-7, 1993, Orlando, Florida, USA. pp. 81-88.

This paper describes a Learning Interface Agent for a meeting scheduling application. The agent employs Machine Learning techniques to customize itself to the user's personal scheduling rules and preferences by observing the user's actions and receiving direct user-feedback. Our approach provides the user with sophisticated control over the gradual delegation of scheduling tasks to the agent, as a trust relationship is built. We report upon an experiment in which a collection of such assistants became gradually more helpful to their users through the use of memory-based and reinforcement learning. The experimental data reported upon demonstrate that the learning approach to building intelligent interface agents is a very promising one which has several advantages over more standard approaches.

© All rights reserved Kozierok and Maes and/or ACM Press

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/pattie_maes.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1993-2012
Pub. count:37
Number of co-authors:39



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Pranav Mistry:7
Marcelo Coelho:5
Enrico Costanza:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Pattie Maes's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Hiroshi Ishii:111
Henry Lieberman:64
 
 
 

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