Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:39
Number of co-authors:87



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Daniel Jackson:7
Tom Bartindale:6
Paul Dunphy:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Patrick Olivier's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Andrew Monk:68
Antonio Krüger:59
Shahram Izadi:50
 
 
 
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Patrick Olivier

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Publications by Patrick Olivier (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Vines, John, Dunphy, Paul, Blythe, Mark, Lindsay, Stephen, Monk, Andrew and Olivier, Patrick (2012): The joy of cheques: trust, paper and eighty somethings. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 147-156.

A cheque is a paper document that orders the transfer of money between bank accounts. Whilst an eighty-year-old in the UK is predicted on average to live at least another ten years, cheques may not. Despite many older peoples extensive use of cheques, UK banks are eager to abolish them and design electronic alternatives that are less costly to process and less vulnerable to fraud. This paper reports on two qualitative studies that explored the banking experiences of 23 people over eighty years old. Cheques support financial collaboration with others in ways that digital payment systems do not. We argue that whilst it might be possible to improve the design of digital payment systems to better support financial collaboration, the case for retaining and enhancing cheques is stronger. Rather than replace cheques, we must design ways of making them less costly to process and better linked to electronic payment methods.

© All rights reserved Vines et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Barden, Pollie, Comber, Rob, Green, David, Jackson, Daniel, Ladha, Cassim, Bartindale, Tom, Bryan-Kinns, Nick, Stockman, Tony and Olivier, Patrick (2012): Telematic dinner party: designing for togetherness through play and performance. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 38-47.

There is an increasing desire to remain connected when physically distant and computer-mediated communication (CMC) is one means of satisfying this desire. In particular, there is a growing trend for individuals to use commercially available technology to connect with friends and family in social and leisure settings. Drawing on this trend, performative arts and existing telecommunications research, we identify the social practice of sharing a meal together as ripe for reinterpretation within CMC. We explore the opportunities to design a technology platform that supports remote guests in experiencing togetherness and playfulness within the practices of a traditional dinner party. Through both visual and aural channels as well as remote agency, the dinner guests were able to share a holistic telematic dining experience comparable to a traditional co-presence dinner. Based on the findings, we propose that one must consider the social structure and cultural background of users to inform the design of a technological intervention.

© All rights reserved Barden et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pykhtina, Olga, Balaam, Madeline, Wood, Gavin, Pattison, Sue, Kharrufa, Ahmed and Olivier, Patrick (2012): Magic land: the design and evaluation of an interactive tabletop supporting therapeutic play with children. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 136-145.

We consider the role and design of digital technologies in play therapy settings with young children. Through an aggregation of the researcher and practitioner literature, and results of discussions with therapists and counselors, we propose a set of design requirements for digital technologies that support non-directive play within a play therapy context. We explore how to design for these complex requirements through the development and evaluation of Magic Land, a set of four play therapy applications for an interactive tabletop. Based on our experiences we recommend that designers create digital interactive toys, which create opportunities for play that would not normally be possible within the traditional play therapy environment.

© All rights reserved Pykhtina et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Briggs, Pam, Blythe, Mark, Vines, John, Lindsay, Stephen, Dunphy, Paul, Nicholson, James, Green, David, Kitson, Jim, Monk, Andrew and Olivier, Patrick (2012): Invisible design: exploring insights and ideas through ambiguous film scenarios. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 534-543.

Invisible Design is a technique for generating insights and ideas with workshop participants in the early stages of concept development. It involves the creation of ambiguous films in which characters discuss a technology that is not directly shown. The technique builds on previous work in HCI on scenarios, persona, theatre, film and ambiguity. The Invisible Design approach is illustrated with three examples from unrelated projects; Biometric Daemon, Panini and Smart Money. The paper presents a qualitative analysis of data from a series of workshops where these Invisible Designs were discussed. The analysis outlines responses to the films in terms of; existing problems, concerns with imagined technologies and design speculation. It is argued that Invisible Design can help to create a space for critical and creative dialogue during participatory concept development.

© All rights reserved Briggs et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hooper, Clare J., Preston, Anne, Balaam, Madeline, Seedhouse, Paul, Jackson, Daniel, Pham, Cuong, Ladha, Cassim, Ladha, Karim, Plötz, Thomas and Olivier, Patrick (2012): The French kitchen: task-based learning in an instrumented kitchen. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 193-202.

Ubiquitous computing technologies have traditionally striven to augment objects and the environment with sensing capabilities to enable them to respond appropriately to the needs of the individuals in the environment. This paper considers how such technologies might be harnessed to support language learning, and specifically Task-Based Learning (TBL). Task-Based Learning (TBL) involves doing meaningful tasks in a foreign language, emphasising the language's use in practice. TBL is seen as a highly engaging and motivating approach to learning a language, but is difficult to do in the classroom. Here, learners typically engage in activities that only simulate 'real-world' tasks, and as such only rehearse language use, rather than applying the language in practice. In this paper, we explore how an instrumented, context-aware environment whose design is grounded in pedagogical principles can support TBL. We present the French Kitchen, an instrumented kitchen for English speakers who are learning French, and describe a 46-participant evaluation of the kitchen. Based on the evaluation, we provide a set of design recommendations for those building instrumented systems for TBL.

© All rights reserved Hooper et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kim, David, Hilliges, Otmar, Izadi, Shahram, Butler, Alex D., Chen, Jiawen, Oikonomidis, Iason and Olivier, Patrick (2012): Digits: freehand 3D interactions anywhere using a wrist-worn gloveless sensor. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 167-176.

Digits is a wrist-worn sensor that recovers the full 3D pose of the user's hand. This enables a variety of freehand interactions on the move. The system targets mobile settings, and is specifically designed to be low-power and easily reproducible using only off-the-shelf hardware. The electronics are self-contained on the user's wrist, but optically image the entirety of the user's hand. This data is processed using a new pipeline that robustly samples key parts of the hand, such as the tips and lower regions of each finger. These sparse samples are fed into new kinematic models that leverage the biomechanical constraints of the hand to recover the 3D pose of the user's hand. The proposed system works without the need for full instrumentation of the hand (for example using data gloves), additional sensors in the environment, or depth cameras which are currently prohibitive for mobile scenarios due to power and form-factor considerations. We demonstrate the utility of Digits for a variety of application scenarios, including 3D spatial interaction with mobile devices, eyes-free interaction on-the-move, and gaming. We conclude with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of our system, and discussion of strengths, limitations and future work.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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McNaney, Roisin, Lindsay, Stephen, Ladha, Karim, Ladha, Cassim, Schofield, Guy, Ploetz, Thomas, Hammerla, Nils, Jackson, Daniel, Walker, Richard, Miller, Nick and Olivier, Patrick (2011): Cueing for drooling in Parkinson's disease. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 619-622.

We present the development of a socially acceptable cueing device for drooling in Parkinson's disease (PD). Sialorrhea, or drooling, is a significant problem associated with PD and has a strong negative emotional impact on those who experience it. Previous studies have shown the potential for managing drooling by using a cueing device. However, the devices used in these studies were deemed unacceptable by their users due to factors such as hearing impairment and social embarrassment. We conducted exploratory scoping work and high fidelity iterative prototyping with people with PD to get their input on the design of a cueing aid and this has given us an insight into challenges that confront users with PD and limit device usability and acceptability. The key finding from working with people with PD was the need for the device to be socially acceptable.

© All rights reserved McNaney et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hook, Jonathan, Green, David, McCarthy, John, Taylor, Stuart, Wright, Peter and Olivier, Patrick (2011): A VJ centered exploration of expressive interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1265-1274.

This paper identifies key themes of expressive interaction for VJs. VJs are visual artists who use digital media to express themselves to an audience during a live audio-visual performance. Those designing for the expressive use of technology can gain insight from an articulation of expressive interaction from the perspective of VJ practice. This is developed using a novel qualitative methodology designed to be sensitive to the subtle and tacit nature of expression. We detail our methodology, present the results of its application to a group of VJs and conclude with a discussion of the implications our findings may have for those wishing to design for VJs, or those in related domains that involve expressive interaction with technology.

© All rights reserved Hook et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Taylor, Robyn, Schofield, Guy, Shearer, John, Wallace, Jayne, Wright, Peter, Boulanger, Pierre and Olivier, Patrick (2011): Designing from within: humanaquarium. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1855-1864.

We present an experience-based approach to designing a collaborative interactive performance, humanaquarium. Our research explores public interaction with digital technology through the practice-based inquiry of an inter-disciplinary team of interaction designers and musicians. We present a method of designing experience from within, literally situating ourselves within the performance/use space and assuming the roles both of performers and of designers as we develop and refine the humanaquarium project over the course of a year's worth of public performances.

© All rights reserved Taylor et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Taylor, Robyn, Schofield, Guy, Shearer, John, Wallace, Jayne, Wright, Peter, Boulanger, Pierre and Olivier, Patrick (2011): humanaquarium: exploring audience, participation, and interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1117-1122.

humanaquarium is a movable performance space designed to explore the dialogical relationship between artist and audience. Two musicians perform inside the cube-shaped box, collaborating with participants to co-create an aesthetic audio-visual experience. The front wall of the humanaquarium is a touch-sensitive FTIR window. MaxMSP is used to translate the locations of touches on the window into control data, manipulating the tracking of software synthesizers and audio effects generated in Ableton Live, and influencing a Jitter visualization projected upon the rear wall of the cube.

© All rights reserved Taylor et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Bartindale, Tom, Clarke, Rachel, Shearer, John, Balaam, Madeline, Wright, Peter and Olivier, Patrick (2011): Bridging the gap: implementing interaction through multi-user design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2071-2076.

We describe an interactive museum installation designed to extend visitor participation through personal reflection and contribution. The case study describes design approaches, which focused on multiple individual simultaneous use, which we describe as multi-user design. These approaches were deployed to support the visitor moving from viewer to contributor in a temporary museum exhibition. We present the anticipated use and early analysis of some of the data from actual use of the system. We outline our initial findings for the opportunities and limits in designing for personalised user-generated content through such approaches within museums and suggest areas of future work on qualities of participation and visitor contribution.

© All rights reserved Bartindale et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Kim, David, Dunphy, Paul, Briggs, Pam, Hook, Jonathan, Nicholson, John, Nicholson, James and Olivier, Patrick (2010): Multi-touch authentication on tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1093-1102.

The introduction of tabletop interfaces has given rise to the need for the development of secure and usable authentication techniques that are appropriate for the co-located collaborative settings for which they have been designed. Most commonly, user authentication is based on something you know, but this is a particular problem for tabletop interfaces, as they are particularly vulnerable to shoulder surfing given their remit to foster co-located collaboration. In other words, tabletop users would typically authenticate in full view of a number of observers. In this paper, we introduce and evaluate a number of novel tabletop authentication schemes that exploit the features of multi-touch interaction in order to inhibit shoulder surfing. In our pilot work with users, and in our formal user-evaluation, one authentication scheme -- Pressure-Grid -- stood out, significantly enhancing shoulder surfing resistance when participants used it to enter both PINs and graphical passwords.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Linehan, Conor, Doughty, Mark, Lawson, Shaun, Kirman, Ben, Olivier, Patrick and Moynihan, Paula (2010): Tagliatelle: social tagging to encourage healthier eating. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3331-3336.

This paper describes the design and initial evaluation of Tag-liatelle, a collaborative tagging application for encouraging healthier eating. Users photograph their own meals and upload these photos to a website, where fellow users anonymously tag them for content. Initial results suggest that tagging of food content is a popular activity. However, further work must be done to automate the extraction of valid nutritional information from the tags generated.

© All rights reserved Linehan et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Hook, Jonathan, Green, David and Olivier, Patrick (2009): A short film about VJs: using documentary film to engage performers in design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3491-3492.

VJing is a live performance of visual media. In their performances VJs utilize technologies in ways which subvert and evolve current interfaces; presenting qualities such as performativeness and expression. By developing interfaces in direct response to a VJ's work, we can learn how to develop fresh styles of interaction. The subtle nuances of a VJ's use of technology may not be achieved through a simple observation or dialogue with VJs; as they are difficult to decouple from the performer's creative process. In this film we present a design process that utilizes video documentary to explore the working practices of a collection of VJs. The documentary frames our engagement with the creative processes which shape an individual artist's performance. We describe the process detailing the initial creation of the documentary, and a participatory design workshop inspired by the film. We conclude with an example of how the process has been used in the design of a personal interactive tool for one of our participants.

© All rights reserved Hook et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Briggs, Pamela, Olivier, Patrick and Kitson, Jim (2009): Film as invisible design: the example of the biometric daemon. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3511-3512.

Film is an accessible medium that can be used naturally to elicit comment and critique. In this sense film can be as the natural language for experience design. We are developing a series of experimental films that can convey user-experience without explicitly depicting the object that generates that experience. In doing this, we are building upon the idea (well rehearsed in the scientific debate about mental imagery) that some visual representations can be inexplicitly non-committal about the presence or absence of certain objects or features. Our films are explicitly non-committal about the objects they describe -- in the sense that the devices are deliberately kept hidden or invisible to the user. We present one such film that captures a security device we call a Biometric Daemon -- essentially an electronic pet that thrives on biometric signals. Crucially, the Daemon is never shown in the film, while the relationship between the Daemon and the user is made apparent.

© All rights reserved Briggs et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Taylor, Robyn, Boulanger, Pierre, Olivier, Patrick and Wallace, Jayne (2009): Exploring participatory performance to inform the design of collaborative public interfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3721-3726.

We describe a new application of interactive participatory performance in interaction design. Our pragmatic strategy permits us to use performance as an investigatory tool in the exploration of user behavior. By taking a holistic view of the evaluation of the interplay between the designed artifact (the performance content) and the people who interact and relate to it, we can extract insights from the performance with the intention of informing the process of designing interaction mechanisms for more conventional public interfaces.

© All rights reserved Taylor et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Schöning, Johannes, Bartindale, Tom, Olivier, Patrick, Jackson, Dan, Krüger, Antonio and Kitson, Jim (2009): iBookmark: locative texts and place-based authoring. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3775-3780.

With the recent developments in ePaper technology, consumer eBook readers have display qualities and form factors that are approaching that of traditional books. These eBook readers are already replacing paper in some commercial domains, but the potential of eBooks to extend forms of writing and storytelling has not been significantly explored. Using the digital and dynamic characteristics afforded by eBook readers, we are developing iBookmark, a GPS-enabled eBook reader. In iBookmark, writers can create stories that change in response to the location of the eBook itself. By setting context variables based on current and past locations of the eBook reader and using these in the rule-based generation of text and illustrations. We are developing new rhetorical device for writers that extend the expressive range of eBook delivered stories.

© All rights reserved Schöning et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bartindale, Tom, Hook, Jonathan and Olivier, Patrick (2009): Media Crate: tangible live media production interface. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 255-262.

 
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Jackson, Daniel, Bartindale, Tom and Olivier, Patrick (2009): FiberBoard: compact multi-touch display using channeled light. In: Proceedings of the 2009 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2009. pp. 25-28.

Multi-touch displays based on infrared (IR) light offer many advantages over alternative technologies. Existing IR multi-touch devices either use complex custom electronic sensor arrays, or a camera that must be placed relatively distant from the display. FiberBoard is an easily constructed compact IR-sensing multi-touch display. Using an array of optical fibers, reflected IR light is channeled to a camera. As the fibers are flexible the camera is free to be positioned so as to minimize the depth of the device. The resulting display is around one tenth of the depth of a conventional camera-based multi-touch display. We describe our prototype, its novel calibration process, and virtual camera software based on existing multi-touch image processing tools.

© All rights reserved Jackson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Jackson, Daniel, Bartindale, Tom and Olivier, Patrick (2009): FiberBoard: compact multi-touch display using channeled light. In: Proceedings of the 2009 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2009. p. D13.

Multi-touch displays based on infrared (IR) light offer many advantages over alternative technologies. Existing IR multi-touch devices either use complex custom electronic sensor arrays, or a camera that must be placed relatively distant from the display. FiberBoard is an easily constructed compact IR-sensing multi-touch display. Using an array of optical fibers, reflected IR light is channeled to a camera. As the fibers are flexible the camera is free to be positioned so as to minimize the depth of the device. The resulting display is around one tenth of the depth of a conventional camera-based multi-touch display. We present our prototype, its novel calibration process, and virtual camera software based on existing multi-touch image processing tools.

© All rights reserved Jackson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Olivier, Patrick and Wallace, Jayne (2009): Digital technologies and the emotional family. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 67 (2) pp. 204-214.

We present an alternative view of family communication that foregrounds both the emotional lives of family members and that which is of personal significance to them. Through the reflections of our participants, and our design response to these, we have used the design of digital jewellery as a window on the family as an emotional entity. In doing so we escape conventional assumptions as to how technology might support family life, and instead propose alternative forms of technology that serve as acceptable sites for highly personalised and personally significant emotional statements. Two designs are presented, Traces and Blossom, which are both responses to the lives and personal accounts of our participants, and a challenge to the conventions of interaction design. By reflecting on our designs we identify and unpick assumptions as to the nature of the digital technology with a view to opening up a design space that places an emphasis on both the individual and the authentic character of our emotional lives.

© All rights reserved Olivier and Wallace and/or Academic Press

 
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Pears, Nick, Jackson, Daniel and Olivier, Patrick (2009): Smart Phone Interaction with Registered Displays. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (2) pp. 14-21.

2008
 
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Dunphy, Paul, Nicholson, James and Olivier, Patrick (2008): Securing passfaces for description. In: Proceedings of the 2008 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2008. pp. 24-35.

One common practice in relation to alphanumeric passwords is to write them down or share them with a trusted friend or colleague. Graphical password schemes often claim the advantage that they are significantly more secure with respect to both verbal disclosure and writing down. We investigated the reality of this claim in relation to the Passfaces graphical password scheme. By collecting a corpus of naturalistic descriptions of a set of 45 faces, we explored participants' ability to associate descriptions with faces across three conditions in which the decoy faces were selected: (1) at random; (2) on the basis of their visual similarity to the target face; and (3) on the basis of the similarity of the verbal descriptions of the decoy faces to the target face. Participants were found to perform significantly worse when presented with visual and verbally grouped decoys, suggesting that Passfaces can be further secured for description. Subtle differences in both the nature of male and female descriptions, and male and female performance were also observed.

© All rights reserved Dunphy et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Carmichael, Alex, Rice, Mark, Lindsay, Stephen and Olivier, Patrick (2008): iTV as a Platform for Rich Multimedia Reminders for People with Dementia. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Obrist, Marianna and Lugmayr, Artur (eds.) 6th European Conference - EuroITV 2008 July 3-4, 2008, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 308-317.

 
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Sulaiman, Ahmed N. and Olivier, Patrick (2008): Attribute gates. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 57-66.

 
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Christie, Marc, Olivier, Patrick and Normand, Jean-Marie (2008): Camera Control in Computer Graphics. In Comput. Graph. Forum, 27 (8) pp. 2197-2218.

 
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Pears, Nick, Olivier, Patrick and Jackson, Daniel (2008): Display Registration for Device Interaction - a Proof of Principle Prototype. In: Ranchordas, Alpesh and Araújo, Helder (eds.) VISAPP 2008 - Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Computer Vision Theory and Applications - Volume 1 January 22-25, 2008, Funchal, Portugal. pp. 446-451.

2007
 
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Butz, Andreas, Fisher, Brian D., Krüger, Antonio and Olivier, Patrick (eds.) (2007): Lecture Notes in Computer Science: Smart graphics 7th international symposium. Heidelberg, Springer-Verlag

 
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Lin, Di, Dunphy, Paul, Olivier, Patrick and Yan, Jeff (2007): Graphical passwords & qualitative spatial relations. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2007. pp. 161-162.

A potential drawback of graphical password schemes is that they are more vulnerable to shoulder surfing than conventional alphanumeric text passwords. We present a variation of the Draw-a-Secret scheme originally proposed by Jermyn et al [1] that is more resistant to shoulder surfing through the use of a qualitative mapping between user strokes and the password, and the use of dynamic grids to both obfuscate attributes of the user secret and encourage them to use different surface realizations of the secret. The use of qualitative spatial relations relaxes the tight constraints on the reconstruction of a secret; allowing a range of deviations from the original. We describe QDAS (Qualitative Draw-A-Secret), an initial implementation of this graphical password scheme, and the results of an empirical study in which we examined the memorability of secrets, and their susceptibility to shoulder-surfing attacks, for both Draw-A-Secret and QDAS.

© All rights reserved Lin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Shearer, John, Olivier, Patrick, Boni, Marco De and Hurling, Robert (2007): Exploring Persuasive Potential of Embodied Conversational Agents Utilizing Synthetic Embodied Conversational Agents. In: Kort, Yvonne de, IJsselsteijn, Wijnand, Midden, Cees J. H., Eggen, Berry and Fogg, B. J. (eds.) PERSUASIVE 2007 - Persuasive Technology, Second International Conference on Persuasive Technology April 26-27, 2007, Palo Alto, CA, USA. pp. 210-213.

2006
 
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Singh, Pushpendra, Ha, Hai Nam, Kuang, Zhiwen, Olivier, Patrick, Kray, Christian, Blythe, Phil and James, Phil (2006): Immersive video as a rapid prototyping and evaluation tool for mobile and ambient applications. In: Proceedings of 8th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2006. p. 264.

A key issue in mobile and ambient computing is the effort required to rapidly prototype and evaluate user interfaces and applications. Existing technologies for these tasks suffer either from low fidelity (e.g. paper prototypes, mental walkthroughs) or effectively require a near full-scale deployment. We propose an approach using immersive video with surround sound and a simulated infrastructure to create a very realistic environment in the office or the lab. It provides a low-cost and rapid means to prototype user interfaces and applications, and to evaluate them in a realistic simulation of the context, in which they are intended to be used.

© All rights reserved Singh et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butz, Andreas, Fisher, Brian D., Krüger, Antonio and Olivier, Patrick (eds.) (2006): Lecture Notes in Computer Science: Smart graphics : 6th international symposium. Berlin, Heidelberg, New York. , Springer-Verlag

 
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Butz, Andreas, Fisher, Brian D., Kruger, Antonio and Olivier, Patrick (eds.) Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Smart Graphics July 23-25, 2006, Vancouver, Canada.

 
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Singh, Pushpendra, Ha, Hai Nam, Kwang, Zhiwen, Olivier, Patrick, Kray, Christian, Blythe, Phil and James, Phil (2006): Immersive video as a rapid prototyping and evaluation tool for mobile and ambient applications. In: Nieminen, Marko and Röykkee, Mika (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006 September 12-15, 2006, Helsinki, Finland. p. 264.

 
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Gratch, Jonathan, Young, Michael, Aylett, Ruth, Ballin, Daniel and Olivier, Patrick (eds.) IVA 2006 - Intelligent Virtual Agents - 6th International Conference August 21-23, 2006, Marina Del Rey, CA, USA.

2005
 
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Butz, Andreas, Fisher, Brian D., Krüger, Antonio and Olivier, Patrick (2005): Lecture Notes in Computer Science: Smart graphics : 5th international symposium. Berlin ,Heidelberg, New York, Springer-Verlag

 
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Panayiotopoulos, Themis, Gratch, Jonathan, Aylett, Ruth, Ballin, Daniel, Olivier, Patrick and Rist, Thomas (eds.) IVA 2005 - Intelligent Virtual Agents - 5th International Working Conference September 12-14, 2005, Kos, Greece.

 
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Olivier, Patrick and Feiner, Steven (2005): Editorial. In Virtual Reality, 8 (4) pp. 199-200.

2002
 
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Anderson, Michael, Meyer, Bernd and Olivier, Patrick (2002): Diagrammatic Representation and Reasoning. London, UK,

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Representation: [/encyclopedia/visual_representation.html]


 
 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/patrick_olivier.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:39
Number of co-authors:87



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Daniel Jackson:7
Tom Bartindale:6
Paul Dunphy:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Patrick Olivier's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Andrew Monk:68
Antonio Krüger:59
Shahram Izadi:50
 
 
 
Jul 10

Visual appearance is one of the most effective variables for quickly differentiating one application from another

-- Bob Baxley, 2003

 
 

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