Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2012
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:11



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Pierre Dillenbourg:4
Marc-Antoine Nssli:3
Guillaume Zufferey:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Patrick Jermann's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Darren Gergle:34
Roman Bednarik:17
Pierre Dillenbourg:16
 
 
 

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Patrick Jermann

 

Publications by Patrick Jermann (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Nssli, Marc-Antoine and Jermann, Patrick (2012): Effects of sharing text selections on gaze cross-recurrence and interaction quality in a pair programming task. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 1125-1134. Available online

We present a dual eye-tracking study that demonstrates the effect of sharing selection among collaborators in a remote pair-programming scenario. Forty pairs of engineering students completed several program understanding tasks while their gaze was synchronously recorded. The coupling of the programmers' focus of attention was measured by a cross-recurrence analysis of gaze that captures how much programmers look at the same sequence of spots within a short time span. A high level of gaze cross-recurrence is typical for pairs who actively engage in grounding efforts to build and maintain shared understanding. As part of their grounding efforts, programmers may use text selection to perform collaborative references. Broadcast selections serve as indexing sites for the selector as they attract non-selector's gaze shortly after they become visible. Gaze cross-recurrence is highest when selectors accompany their selections with speech to produce a multimodal reference.

© All rights reserved Nssli and Jermann and/or ACM Press

 
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Jermann, Patrick, Gergle, Darren, Bednarik, Roman and Brennan, Susan (2012): Duet 2012: dual eye tracking in CSCW. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 23-24. Available online

Dual eye-tracking (DUET) is a promising methodology to study and support collaborative work. The method consists of simultaneously recording the gaze of two collaborators working on a common task. The main themes addressed in the workshop are eye-tracking methodology (how to translate gaze measures into descriptions of joint action, how to measure and model gaze alignment between collaborators, how to include gaze in multimodal interaction models, how to address task specificity inherent to eye-tracking data), empirical studies involving dual eye tracking and more generally future applications of dual eye-tracking in CSCW.

© All rights reserved Jermann et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cuendet, Sbastien, Jermann, Patrick and Dillenbourg, Pierre (2012): Tangible interfaces: when physical-virtual coupling may be detrimental to learning. In: Proceedings of the HCI12 Conference on People and Computers XXVI 2012. pp. 49-58. Available online

Tangible user interfaces (TUIs) have been the focus of much attention recently in the HCI and learning communities. Although TUIs seem to intuitively offer potential to increase the learning experience, there have been questions about whether they actually impact learning positively. TUIs offer new ways of interactions and it is essential to understand how the design choices made for these new interactions affect learning. One element that is key in the learning process is how and when feedback is provided. In this article, we focus on the effect of co-located immediate process-level feedback on learning. We report the results of a study in which 56 participants used a TUI to complete tasks related to the training of spatial skills. Half of the students accomplished the tasks with immediate and co-located feedback from the system, while the other half of the students did not receive any feedback. Results show that participants who did not receive feedback manipulated less, reflected more, and in the end learned more than those who received feedback.

© All rights reserved Cuendet et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Kaplan, Frdric and Jermann, Patrick (eds.) First workshop on Paper Computing, Papercomp 2010 September 25, 2010, Copenhagen, Danemark.

 
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Kaplan, Frdric and Jermann, Patrick (2010): PaperComp 2010: first international workshop on paper computing. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 507-510. Available online

Paper is not dead. Despite the progress of e-ink screens, smartphones and tablet interfaces, printed paper stays a convenient, versatile and familiar support for reading and writing. Books, magazines and other printed materials can now be connected to the digital world, enriched with additional content and even transformed into interactive interfaces. Conversely, some of the screen-based interfaces we currently use to interact with digital data could benefit from being paper-based or make use of specially designed material as light and flexible as paper. Far from a paperless world, printed documents could become ubiquitous interfaces in our everyday interaction with digital information. This is the dawn of paper computing.

© All rights reserved Kaplan and Jermann and/or their publisher

 
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Li, Weifeng, Nssli, Marc-Antoine and Jermann, Patrick (2010): Gaze quality assisted automatic recognition of social contexts in collaborative Tetris. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2010. p. 8. Available online

The use of dual eye-tracking is investigated in a collaborative game setting. Social context influences individual gaze and action during a collaborative Tetris game: results show that experts as well as novices adapt their playing style when interacting in mixed ability pairs. The long term goal of our work is to design adaptive gaze awareness tools that take the pair composition into account. We therefore investigate the automatic detection (or recognition) of pair composition using dual gaze-based as well as action-based multimodal features. We describe several methods for the improvement of detection (or recognition) and experimentally demonstrate their effectiveness, especially in the situations when the collected gaze data are noisy.

© All rights reserved Li et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jermann, Patrick, Nssli, Marc-Antoine and Li, Weifeng (2010): Using dual eye-tracking to unveil coordination and expertise in collaborative Tetris. In: Proceedings of the HCI10 Conference on People and Computers XXIV 2010. pp. 36-44. Available online

The use of dual eye-tracking is investigated in a collaborative game setting. The automatic collection of information about partner's gaze will eventually serve to build adaptive interfaces. Following this agenda, and in order to identify stable gaze patterns, we investigate the impact of social and task related context upon individual gaze and action during a collaborative Tetris game. Results show that experts as well as novices adapt their playing style when interacting in mixed ability pairs. We also present machine learning results about the prediction of player's social context.

© All rights reserved Jermann et al. and/or BCS

2009
 
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Zufferey, Guillaume, Jermann, Patrick, Lucchi, Aurlien and Dillenbourg, Pierre (2009): TinkerSheets: using paper forms to control and visualize tangible simulations. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 377-384. Available online

 
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Lucchi, Aurlien, Jermann, Patrick, Zufferey, Guillaume and Dillenbourg, Pierre (2009): An empirical evaluation of touch and tangible interfaces for tabletop displays. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 177-184. Available online

Tabletop systems have become quite popular in recent years, during which there was considerable enthusiasm for the development of new interfaces. In this paper, we establish a comparison between touch and tangible interfaces. We set up an experiment involving several actions like translation and rotation. We recruited 40 participants to take part in a user study and we present our results with a discussion on the design of touch and tangible interfaces. Our contribution is an empirical study showing that overall, the tangible interface is much faster but under certain conditions, the touch interface could gain the upper hand.

© All rights reserved Lucchi et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Zufferey, Guillaume, Jermann, Patrick, Do-Lenh, Son and Dillenbourg, Pierre (2009): Using augmentations as bridges from concrete to abstract representations. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 130-139. Available online

We describe a pedagogical approach supporting the acquisition of abstraction skills by apprentices in logistics. Apprentices start with a concrete representation in the form of a small-scale model which aims at engaging them in learning activities. Multiple External Representations are used to progressively introduce more abstract representations displayed on paper-based forms called TinkerSheets. We present the implementation of this approach on the TinkerTable, a tabletop learning environment which is used in two professional schools by four different teachers. We report observations of the use of the environment at different stages of the curriculum with first- and second-year apprentices.

© All rights reserved Zufferey et al. and/or their publisher

 
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