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Patrick Healey

 

Publications by Patrick Healey (bibliography)

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2008
 
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Healey, Patrick, White, Graham, Eshghi, Arash, Reeves, Ahmad and Light, Ann (2008): Communication Spaces. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (2) pp. 169-193. Available online

Concepts of space are fundamental to our understanding of human action and interaction. The common sense concept of uniform, metric, physical space is inadequate for design. It fails to capture features of social norms and practices that can be critical to the success of a technology. The concept of 'place' addresses these limitations by taking account of the different ways a space may be understood and used. This paper argues for the importance of a third concept: communication space. Motivated by Heidegger's discussion of 'being-with' this concept addresses differences in interpersonal 'closeness' or mutual-involvement that are a constitutive feature of human interaction. We apply the concepts of space, place and communication space to the analysis of a corpus of interactions from an online community, 'Walford', which has a rich communicative ecology. A novel measure of sequential integration of conversational turns is proposed as an index of mutal-involvement. We demonstrate systematic differences in mutual-involvement that cannot be accounted for in terms of space or place and conclude that a concept of communication space is needed to address the organisation of human encounters in this community.

© All rights reserved Healey et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
Edit | Del

Healey, Patrick, White, Graham, Eshghi, Arash, Reeves, Ahmad and Light, Ann (2008): Communication Spaces. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (2) pp. 169-193. Available online

Concepts of space are fundamental to our understanding of human action and interaction. The common sense concept of uniform, metric, physical space is inadequate for design. It fails to capture features of social norms and practices that can be critical to the success of a technology. The concept of 'place' addresses these limitations by taking account of the different ways a space may be understood and used. This paper argues for the importance of a third concept: communication space. Motivated by Heidegger's discussion of 'being-with' this concept addresses differences in interpersonal 'closeness' or mutual-involvement that are a constitutive feature of human interaction. We apply the concepts of space, place and communication space to the analysis of a corpus of interactions from an online community, 'Walford', which has a rich communicative ecology. A novel measure of sequential integration of conversational turns is proposed as an index of mutal-involvement. We demonstrate systematic differences in mutual-involvement that cannot be accounted for in terms of space or place and conclude that a concept of communication space is needed to address the organisation of human encounters in this community.

© All rights reserved Healey et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

1997
 
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McCarthy, John C., Wright, Peter C., Healey, Patrick, Dearden, Andrew M. and Harrison, Michael D. (1997): Locating the Scene: The Particular and the General in Contexts for Ambulance Control. In: Payne, Stephen C. and Prinz, Wolfgang (eds.) Proceedings of the International ACM SIGGROUP Conference on Supporting Group Work 1997 November 11-19, 1997, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. pp. 101-110. Available online

Ambulance control involves distributed group work using a mix of computer and communications technologies. The implementation of computer technologies has had mixed results in this area, evidenced by serious failures in the London Ambulance Service in 1992. Often failures are due to inadequate attention to integration of organisational and technical aspects of work. We report a field study of the organisation of one aspect of the work of ambulance control, locating the scene of an emergency. The study was carried out in two ambulance control centres, one predominantly urban and highly computerised and the other largely rural and minimally computerised. Our analysis shows that the particulars of 'locating the scene' are best seen in terms of the use of different technologies to link representations and represented. This research has implications for understanding task and context and the integration of technology and organisation in design, particularly with respect to using similar computer-based technologies in both ambulance control centres.

© All rights reserved McCarthy et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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