Publication statistics

Pub. period:2005-2012
Pub. count:22
Number of co-authors:19



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Julie Wagner:
Mathieu Nancel:
Emmanuel Pietriga:

 

 

Productive colleagues

Olivier Chapuis's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Wendy E. Mackay:61
Michel Beaudouin-L..:53
Jean-Daniel Fekete:35
 
 
 

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Olivier Chapuis

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Publications by Olivier Chapuis (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Pindat, Cyprien, Pietriga, Emmanuel, Chapuis, Olivier and Puech, Claude (2012): JellyLens: content-aware adaptive lenses. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 261-270. Available online

Focus+context lens-based techniques smoothly integrate two levels of detail using spatial distortion to connect the magnified region and the context. Distortion guarantees visual continuity, but causes problems of interpretation and focus targeting, partly due to the fact that most techniques are based on statically-defined, regular lens shapes, that result in far-from-optimal magnification and distortion. JellyLenses dynamically adapt to the shape of the objects of interest, providing detail-in-context visualizations of higher relevance by optimizing what regions fall into the focus, context and spatially-distorted transition regions. This both improves the visibility of content in the focus region and preserves a larger part of the context region. We describe the approach and its implementation, and report on a controlled experiment that evaluates the usability of JellyLenses compared to regular fisheye lenses, showing clear performance improvements with the new technique for a multi-scale visual search task.

© All rights reserved Pindat et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Nancel, Mathieu, Wagner, Julie, Pietriga, Emmanuel, Chapuis, Olivier and Mackay, Wendy (2011): Mid-air pan-and-zoom on wall-sized displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 177-186. Available online

Very-high-resolution wall-sized displays offer new opportunities for interacting with large data sets. While pointing on this type of display has been studied extensively, higher-level, more complex tasks such as pan-zoom navigation have received little attention. It thus remains unclear which techniques are best suited to perform multiscale navigation in these environments. Building upon empirical data gathered from studies of pan-and-zoom on desktop computers and studies of remote pointing, we identified three key factors for the design of mid-air pan-and-zoom techniques: uni- vs. bimanual interaction, linear vs. circular movements, and level of guidance to accomplish the gestures in mid-air. After an extensive phase of iterative design and pilot testing, we ran a controlled experiment aimed at better understanding the influence of these factors on task performance. Significant effects were obtained for all three factors: bimanual interaction, linear gestures and a high level of guidance resulted in significantly improved performance. Moreover, the interaction effects among some of the dimensions suggest possible combinations for more complex, real-world tasks.

© All rights reserved Nancel et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Huot, Stephane, Chapuis, Olivier and Dragicevic, Pierre (2011): TorusDesktop: pointing via the backdoor is sometimes shorter. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 829-838. Available online

When pointing to a target on a computer desktop, we may think we are taking the shortest possible path. But new shortcuts become possible if we allow the mouse cursor to jump from one edge of the screen to the opposite one, i.e., if we turn the desktop into a torus. We discuss the design of TORUSDESKTOP, a pointing technique that allows to wrap the cursor around screen edges to open this pointing backdoor. A dead zone and an off-screen cursor feedback make the technique more usable and more compatible with everyday desktop usage. We report on three controlled experiments conducted to refine the design of the technique and evaluate its performance. The results suggest clear benefits of using the backdoor when target distance is more than 80% the screen size in our experimental conditions.

© All rights reserved Huot et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Appert, Caroline, Chapuis, Olivier and Pietriga, Emmanuel (2010): High-precision magnification lenses. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 273-282. Available online

Focus+context interfaces provide in-place magnification of a region of the display, smoothly integrating the focus of attention into its surroundings. Two representations of the data exist simultaneously at two different scales, providing an alternative to classical pan&zoom for navigating multi-scale interfaces. For many practical applications however, the magnification range of focus+context techniques is too limited. This paper addresses this limitation by exploring the quantization problem: the mismatch between visual and motor precision in the magnified region. We introduce three new interaction techniques that solve this problem by integrating fast navigation and high-precision interaction in the magnified region. Speed couples precision to navigation speed. Key and Ring use a discrete switch between precision levels, the former using a keyboard modifier, the latter by decoupling the cursor from the lens' center. We report on three experiments showing that our techniques make interacting with lenses easier while increasing the range of practical magnification factors, and that performance can be further improved by integrating speed-dependent visual behaviors.

© All rights reserved Appert et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Chapuis, Olivier and Roussel, Nicolas (2010): UIMarks: quick graphical interaction with specific targets. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 173-182. Available online

This paper reports on the design and evaluation of UIMarks, a system that lets users specify on-screen targets and associated actions by means of a graphical marking language. UIMarks supplements traditional pointing by providing an alternative mode in which users can quickly activate these marks. Associated actions can range from basic pointing facilitation to complex sequences possibly involving user interaction: one can leave a mark on a palette to make it more reachable, but the mark can also be configured to wait for a click and then automatically move the pointer back to its original location, for example. The system has been implemented on two different platforms, Metisse and OS X. We compared it to traditional pointing on a set of elementary and composite tasks in an abstract setting. Although pure pointing was not improved, the programmable automation supported by the system proved very effective.

© All rights reserved Chapuis and Roussel and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Faure, Guillaume, Chapuis, Olivier and Roussel, Nicolas (2009): Power Tools for Copying and Moving: Useful Stuff for your Desktop. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors and Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1675-1678. Available online

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1518701.1518958

© All rights reserved Faure et al. and/or ACM

 
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Chapuis, Olivier, Labrune, Jean-Baptiste and Pietriga, Emmanuel (2009): DynaSpot: Speed-Dependent Area Cursor. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors and Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1391-1400. Available online

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1518701.1518911

© All rights reserved Chapuis et al. and/or ACM

 
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Chapuis, Olivier, Labrune, Jean-Baptiste and Pietriga, Emmanuel (2009): DynaSpot: speed-dependent area cursor. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1391-1400. Available online

We present DynaSpot, a new technique for acquiring targets based on the area cursor. DynaSpot couples the cursor's activation area with its speed, behaving like a point cursor at low speed or when motionless. This technique minimizes visual distraction and allows pointing anywhere in empty space without requiring an explicit mode switch, thus enabling users to perform common interactions such as region selections seamlessly. The results of our controlled experiments show that the performance of DynaSpot can be modeled by Fitts' law, and that DynaSpot significantly outperforms the point cursor and achieves, in most conditions, the same level of performance as one of the most promising techniques to date, the Bubble cursor.

© All rights reserved Chapuis et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Faure, Guillaume, Chapuis, Olivier and Roussel, Nicolas (2009): Power tools for copying and moving: useful stuff for your desktop. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1675-1678. Available online

Copy and move operations have long been supported by interactive desktops through various means. But the growing number of on-screen objects makes these means harder to use. In this note, we present new tools and techniques to enhance the existing ones: a selection, copy and drag history manager; two techniques to expose the user's desk and leaf through stacks of overlapping windows; and a technique that integrates the previous two with conventional drag-and-drop.

© All rights reserved Faure et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Appert, Caroline, Chapuis, Olivier and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (2008): Evaluation of Pointing Performance on Screen Edges. In: Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces May 28-30, 2008, Napoli, Italy. pp. 119-126.

Pointing on screen edges is a frequent task in our everyday use of computers. Screen edges can help stop cursor movements, requiring less precise movements from the user. Thus, pointing at elements located on the edges should be faster than pointing in the central screen area. This article presents two experiments to better understand the foundations of "edge pointing". The first study assesses several factors both on completion time and on users' mouse movements. The results highlight some weaknesses in the current design of desktop environments (such as the cursor shape) and reveal that movement direction plays an important role in users' performance. The second study quantifies the gain of edge pointing by comparing it with other models such as regular pointing and crossing. The results not only show that the gain can be up to 44%, but also reveal that movement angle has an effect on performance for all tested models. This leads to a generalization of the 2D Index of Difficulty of Accot and Zhai that takes movement direction into account to predict pointing time using Fitts' law.

© All rights reserved Appert et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Appert, Caroline, Chapuis, Olivier and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (2008): Evaluation of pointing performance on screen edges. In: Levialdi, Stefano (ed.) AVI 2008 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces May 28-30, 2008, Napoli, Italy. pp. 119-126. Available online

2007
 
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Chapuis, Olivier and Roussel, Nicolas (2007): Copy-and-paste between overlapping windows. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 201-210. Available online

Copy-and-paste, one of the fundamental operations of modern userinterfaces, can be performed through various means (e.g. using the keyboard, mouse-based direct manipulation or menus). When users copy-and-paste between two different windows, the process is complicated by window management tasks. In this paper, we propose two new window management techniques to facilitate these tasks in the particular case of partially overlapping windows. We describe an experiment comparing four commonly-used copy-and-paste techniques under four window management conditions -- non-overlapping windows, partially overlapping windows, and partially overlapping ones with one of our two window management techniques. Results show that our new window management techniques significantly reduce task completion time for all copy-and-paste techniques. They also show that X Window copy-and-paste is faster than the other three techniques under all four window management conditions.

© All rights reserved Chapuis and Roussel and/or ACM Press

 
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Guiard, Yves, Du, Yangzhou and Chapuis, Olivier (2007): Quantifying degree of goal directedness in document navigation: application to the evaluation of the perspective-drag technique. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 327-336. Available online

This article pursues a two-fold goal. First we introduce degree of goal directedness (DGD), a novel quantitative dimension for the taxonomy of navigation tasks in general. As an attempt to operationalize the DGD concept in the context of electronic documents navigation, we introduce the serial target-acquisition (STA) experimental paradigm. We suggest that DGD and the STA paradigm may usefully enrich the conceptual toolkit of HCI research for the evaluation of navigation techniques. Our second goal is to illustrate the utility of the DGD concept by showing with a concrete example, Perspective Drag, the refinement it allows in evaluating navigation techniques. We report data obtained from two experiments with the STA paradigm that cast light on what Perspective Drag is specifically good for: it is particularly suitable in realistic task contexts where navigation is less than 100% directed by its terminal goal, that is, where the user wants not only to reach a particular item but also to pick up information from the document during document traversal.

© All rights reserved Guiard et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mackay, Wendy E., Appert, Caroline, Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel, Chapuis, Olivier, Du, Yangzhou, Fekete, Jean-Daniel and Guiard, Yves (2007): Touchstone: exploratory design of experiments. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1425-1434. Available online

Touchstone is an open-source experiment design platform designed to help establish a solid research foundation for HCI in the area of novel interaction techniques. Touchstone includes a design platform for exploring alternative designs of controlled laboratory experiments, a run platform for running subjects and a limited analysis platform for advice and access to on-line statistics packages. Designed for HCI researchers and their students, Touchstone facilitates the process of creating new experiments, as well as replicating and extending experiments in the research literature. We tested Touchstone by designing two controlled experiments. One illustrates how to create a new experiment from scratch. The other replicates and extends a previous study of multiscale pointing interaction techniques: OrthoZoom was fastest, followed by bi-manual Pan&Zoom; SDAZ and traditional Pan&Zoom were consistently slower.

© All rights reserved Mackay et al. and/or ACM Press

2006
 
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Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang, Chapuis, Olivier, Phillips, Dusty and Roussel, Nicolas (2006): User interface facades: towards fully adaptable user interfaces. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2006. pp. 309-318. Available online

User interfaces are becoming more and more complex. Adaptable and adaptive interfaces have been proposed to address this issue and previous studies have shown that users prefer interfaces that they can adapt to self-adjusting ones. However, most existing systems provide users with little support for adapting their interfaces. Interface customization techniques are still very primitive and usually constricted to particular applications. In this paper, we present User Interface Facades, a system that provides users with simple ways to adapt, reconfigure, and re-combine existing graphical interfaces, through the use of direct manipulation techniques. The paper describes the user's view of the system, provides some technical details, and presents several examples to illustrate its potential.

© All rights reserved Stuerzlinger et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Du, Yangzhou, Guiard, Yves, Chapuis, Olivier and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (2006): Assisting Target Acquisition in Perspective Views. In: People and Computers XX - Proceedings of HCI 2006. pp. 135-150. Available online

This article introduces an interaction technique designed to assist target acquisition in flat documents that are visualized in perspective. One reason to allow camera tilts in graphical interfaces is that perspective views provide users with a gradual variation of scale, allowing them to see local detail in the context of a general overview. Our analysis, however, shows that the non-linearity of scale variation in a perspective view jeopardizes the acquisition of very remotely located objects. We introduce and experimentally evaluate a solution in which: 1. viewing angle is automatically coupled with tilt angle; and 2. the tilt is constrained so that the virtual camera stays at a constant altitude and remains pointed to a fixed spot on the document. Our results show that with our enhanced perspective navigation technique targets are easy to reach even for extremely high levels of difficulty. Target acquisition time obeys Fitts' Law and performance becomes as rapid as with the familiar pan and zoom technique.

© All rights reserved Du et al. and/or Springer

 
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Guiard, Yves, Chapuis, Olivier, Du, Yangzhou and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (2006): Allowing camera tilts for document navigation in the standard GUI: a discussion and an experiment. In: Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced visual interfaces May 23-26, 2006, Venezia, Italy. pp. 241-244. Available online

The current GUI is like a flight simulator whose camera points fixedly at right angle to the document, thus preventing users from looking ahead while navigating. We argue that perspective viewing of usual planar documents can help navigation. We analyze the scale implosion problem that arises with tilted cameras and we report the data of a formal experiment on document navigation with perspective views.

© All rights reserved Guiard et al. and/or ACM Press, New York, NY

 
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Guiard, Yves, Chapuis, Olivier, Du, Yangzhou and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (2006): Allowing camera tilts for document navigation in the standard GUI: a discussion and an experiment. In: Celentano, Augusto (ed.) AVI 2006 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced visual interfaces May 23-26, 2006, Venezia, Italy. pp. 241-244. Available online

 
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Guiard, Yves, Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel, Du, Yangzhou, Appert, Caroline, Fekete, Jean-Daniel and Chapuis, Olivier (2006): Shakespeare's complete works as a benchmark for evaluating multiscale document navigation techniques. In: Bertini, Enrico, Plaisant, Catherine and Santucci, Giuseppe (eds.) BELIV 2006 - Proceedings of the 2006 AVI Workshop on BEyond time and errors novel evaluation methods for information visualization May 23, 2006, Venice, Italy. pp. 1-6. Available online

2005
 
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Chapuis, Olivier and Roussel, Nicolas (2005): Metisse is not a 3D desktop!. In: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2005. pp. 13-22. Available online

Twenty years after the general adoption of overlapping windows and the desktop metaphor, modern window systems differ mainly in minor details such as window decorations or mouse and keyboard bindings. While a number of innovative window management techniques have been proposed, few of them have been evaluated and fewer have made their way into real systems. We believe that one reason for this is that most of the proposed techniques have been designed using a low fidelity approach and were never made properly available. In this paper, we present Metisse, a fully functional window system specifically created to facilitate the design, the implementation and the evaluation of innovative window management techniques. We describe the architecture of the system, some of its implementation details and present several examples that illustrate its potential.

© All rights reserved Chapuis and Roussel and/or ACM Press

 
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Chapuis, Olivier (2005): Gestion des fenêtres: enregistrement et visualisation de l'interaction. In: Proceedings of the 2005 Conference of the Association Francophone dInteraction Homme-Machine 2005. pp. 255-258. Available online

The recent graphical rendering models of desktop computers can be used to explore new window management techniques. In order to evaluate these new techniques, we should have tools that help us better understand how users manipulate their windows. We present a log and visualization tool of the Human-Window interaction for the X Window system. The tool allows to replay a session (without the windows contents) as a video. A filtering system allows to select and easily access high level actions. We give some examples of application of this system.

© All rights reserved Chapuis and/or ACM Press

 
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Roussel, Nicolas and Chapuis, Olivier (2005): Metisse: un système de fenêtrage hautement configurable et utilisable au quotidien. In: Proceedings of the 2005 Conference of the Association Francophone dInteraction Homme-Machine 2005. pp. 279-282. Available online

Twenty years after the general adoption of overlapping windows and the desktop metaphor, modern window systems differ mainly in minor details. While a number of innovative window management techniques have been proposed, few of them have been evaluated and fewer have made their way into real systems. In this paper, we present Metisse, a fully functional window system specifically created to facilitate the design, the implementation and the evaluation of innovative window management techniques.

© All rights reserved Roussel and Chapuis and/or ACM Press

 
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