Publication statistics

Pub. period:2003-2012
Pub. count:32
Number of co-authors:63



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Hans-Werner Gellersen:12
Shahram Izadi:9
Albrecht Schmidt:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Nicolas Villar's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Saul Greenberg:140
Steve Benford:121
Albrecht Schmidt:111
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Emotional Design: How to make products people will love
Starts TODAY LAST CALL!
go to course
UI Design Patterns for Successful Software
87% booked. Starts in 8 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Nicolas Villar

Personal Homepage:
research.microsoft.com/en-us/people/nvillar/


 

Publications by Nicolas Villar (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Kuznetsov, Stacey, Taylor, Alex S., Regan, Tim, Villar, Nicolas and Paulos, Eric (2012): At the seams: DIYbio and opportunities for HCI. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 258-267. Available online

DIYbio (Do It Yourself Biology) aims to 'open source', tinker and experiment with biology outside of professional settings. In this paper, we present the origins, practices, and challenges of DIYbio initiatives around the world. Our findings depict DIYbio as operating across intersections ('seams') between a range of stakeholders, materials and concerns. To map out the role of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) across these seams, we present design exercises (functional prototypes) that explore three areas for future work: internal collaboration tools within the DIYbio and professional community; mechanisms for external communication with stakeholders from the general public; and bio-electronic assemblies of organic and digital materials. In doing so, we hope to critically re-envision the role of HCI at the emerging intersection of biology, computation and DIY.

© All rights reserved Kuznetsov et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Whittaker, Steve, Kalnikait, Vaiva, Petrelli, Daniela, Sellen, Abigail, Villar, Nicolas, Bergman, Ofer, Clough, Paul and Brockmeier, Jens (2012): Socio-Technical Lifelogging: Deriving Design Principles for a Future Proof Digital Past. In Eminds International Journal of Human Computer Interaction, 27 (1) pp. 37-62. Available online

Lifelogging is a technically inspired approach that attempts to address the problem of human forgetting by developing systems that "record everything." Uptake of lifelogging systems has generally been disappointing, however. One reason for this lack of uptake is the absence of design principles for developing digital systems to support memory. Synthesizing multiple studies, we identify and evaluate 4 new empirically motivated design principles for lifelogging: Selectivity, Embodiment, Synergy, and Reminiscence. We first summarize four empirical studies that motivate the principles, then describe the evaluation of four novel systems built to embody these principles. We show that design principles were generative, leading to the development of new classes of lifelogging system, as well as providing strategic guidance about how those systems should be built. Evaluations suggest support for Selection and Embodiment principles, but more conceptual and technical work is needed to refine the Synergy and Reminiscence principles.

© All rights reserved Whittaker et al. and/or Universidad de Oviedo

2011
 
Edit | Del

Badshah, Akash, Gupta, Sidhant, Cohn, Gabe, Villar, Nicolas, Hodges, Steve and Patel, Shwetak N. (2011): Interactive generator: a self-powered haptic feedback device. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2051-2054. Available online

We present Interactive Generator (InGen), a self-powered wireless rotary input device capable of generating haptic or force feedback without the need for any external power source. Our approach uses a modified servomotor to perform three functions: (1) generating power for wireless communication and embedded electronics, (2) sensing the direction and speed of rotation, and (3) providing force feedback during rotation. While InGen is rotating, the device is capable of providing the sensation of detents or bumps, changes in stiffness, and abrupt stops using only power that is harvested during interaction. We describe the device in detail, demonstrate an initial 'TV remote control' application, and end with a discussion of our experiences developing the prototype and application. To the best of our knowledge, InGen is the first self-powered device, which also provides haptic feedback during operation. More broadly, this work demonstrates a new class of input systems that uses human-generated power to provide feedback to the user and wirelessly communicate sensed information.

© All rights reserved Badshah et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Kalnikait, Vaiva, Rogers, Yvonne, Bird, Jon, Villar, Nicolas, Bachour, Khaled, Payne, Stephen, Todd, Peter M., Schoning, Johannes, Krger, Antonio and Kreitmayer, Stefan (2011): How to nudge in Situ: designing lambent devices to deliver salient information in supermarkets. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 11-20. Available online

There are a number of mobile shopping aids and recommender systems available, but none can be easily used for a weekly shop at a local supermarket. We present a minimal, mobile and fully functional lambent display that clips onto any shopping trolley handle, intended to nudge people when choosing what to buy. It provides salient information about the food miles for various scanned food items represented by varying lengths of lit LEDs on the handle and a changing emoticon comparing the average miles of all the products in the trolley against a social norm. When evaluated in situ, the lambent handle display nudged people to choose products with fewer food miles than the items they selected using their ordinary shopping strategies. People also felt guilty when the average mileage of the contents of their entire shopping trolley was above the social norm. The findings are discussed in terms of how to provide different kinds of product information that people care about, using simple lambent displays.

© All rights reserved Kalnikait et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Davidoff, Scott, Villar, Nicolas, Taylor, Alex S. and Izadi, Shahram (2011): Mechanical hijacking: how robots can accelerate UbiComp deployments. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 267-270. Available online

The complexities and costs of deploying Ubicomp applications seriously compromise our ability to evaluate such systems in the real world. To simplify Ubicomp deployment we introduce the robotic pseudopod (P.Pod), an actuator that acts on mechanical switches originally designed for human control only. P.Pods enable computational control of devices by hijacking their mechanical switches -- a term we refer to as mechanical hijacking. P.Pods offer simple, low-cost, non-destructive computational access to installed hardware, enabling functional, real world Ubicomp deployments. In this paper, we illustrate how three P.Pod primitives, built with the Lego MindStorm NXT toolkit, can implement mechanical hijacking, facilitating real world Ubicomp deployments which otherwise require extensive changes to existing hardware or infrastructure. Lastly, we demonstrate the simplicity of P.Pods by observing two middle school classes build working smart home applications in 4 hours.

© All rights reserved Davidoff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Scott, James, Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Krumm, John, Meyers, Brian, Hazas, Michael, Hodges, Stephen and Villar, Nicolas (2011): PreHeat: controlling home heating using occupancy prediction. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 281-290. Available online

Home heating is a major factor in worldwide energy use. Our system, PreHeat, aims to more efficiently heat homes by using occupancy sensing and occupancy prediction to automatically control home heating. We deployed PreHeat in five homes, three in the US and two in the UK. In UK homes, we controlled heating on a per-room basis to enable further energy savings. We compared PreHeat's prediction algorithm with a static program over an average 61 days per house, alternating days between these conditions, and measuring actual gas consumption and occupancy. In UK homes PreHeat both saved gas and reduced MissTime (the time that the house was occupied but not warm). In US homes, PreHeat decreased MissTime by a factor of 6-12, while consuming a similar amount of gas. In summary, PreHeat enables more efficient heating while removing the need for users to program thermostat schedules.

© All rights reserved Scott et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
Edit | Del

Block, Florian, Gellersen, Hans-Werner and Villar, Nicolas (2010): Touch-display keyboards: transforming keyboards into interactive surfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1145-1154. Available online

In spite of many advances in GUI workstations, the keyboard has remained limited to text entry and basic command invocation. In this work, we introduce the Touch-Display Keyboard (TDK), a novel keyboard that combines the physical-ergonomic qualities of the conventional keyboard with dynamic display and touch-sensing embedded in each key. The TDK effectively transforms the keyboard into an interactive surface that is seamlessly integrated with the interaction space of GUIs, extending graphical output, mouse interaction and three-state input to the keyboard. This gives rise to an entirely new design space of interaction across keyboard, mouse and screen, for which we provide a first systematic analysis in this paper. We illustrate the emerging design opportunities with a host of novel interaction concepts and techniques, and show how these contribute to expressiveness of GUIs, exploration and learning of keyboard interfaces, and interface customization across graphics display and physical keyboard.

© All rights reserved Block et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Cao, Xiang, Villar, Nicolas and Izadi, Shahram (2010): Comparing user performance with single-finger, whole-hand, and hybrid pointing devices. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1643-1646. Available online

Researchers have explored pointing devices operated by a single finger, but their advantage was not clear compared to conventional mice controlled by the whole hand. To incorporate the benefits of both, we prototyped hybrid pointing devices that combined both finger and hand movement to control the cursor, and experimentally compared their performance with single-finger and whole-hand devices. Results showed that such hybrid devices have the potential to improve pointing performance in terms of time, error, and bandwidth, especially for precise pointing.

© All rights reserved Cao et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Marquardt, Nicolai, Taylor, Alex S., Villar, Nicolas and Greenberg, Saul (2010): Rethinking RFID: awareness and control for interaction with RFID systems. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2307-2316. Available online

People now routinely carry radio frequency identification (RFID) tags -- in passports, driver's licenses, credit cards, and other identifying cards -- from which nearby RFID readers can access privacy-sensitive information. The problem is that people are often unaware of security and privacy risks associated with RFID, likely because the technology remains largely invisible and uncontrollable for the individual. To mitigate this problem, we introduce a collection of novel yet simple and inexpensive tag designs. Our tags provide reader awareness, where people get visual, audible, or tactile feedback as tags come into the range of RFID readers. Our tags also provide information control, where people can allow or disallow access to the information stored on the tag by how they touch, orient, move, press or illuminate the tag.

© All rights reserved Marquardt et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Petrelli, Daniela, Villar, Nicolas, Kalnikait, Vaiva, Dib, Lina and Whittaker, Steve (2010): FM radio: family interplay with sonic mementos. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2371-2380. Available online

Digital mementos are increasingly problematic, as people acquire large amounts of digital belongings that are hard to access and often forgotten. Based on fieldwork with 10 families, we designed a new type of embodied digital memento, the FM Radio. It allows families to access and play sonic mementos of their previous holidays. We describe our underlying design motivation where recordings are presented as a series of channels on an old fashioned radio. User feedback suggests that the device met our design goals: being playful and intriguing, easy to use and social. It facilitated family interaction, and allowed ready access to mementos, thus sharing many of the properties of physical mementos that we intended to trigger.

© All rights reserved Petrelli et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Marquardt, Nicolai, Taylor, Alex S., Villar, Nicolas and Greenberg, Saul (2010): Visible and controllable RFID tags. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3057-3062. Available online

Radio frequency identification (RFID) tags containing privacy-sensitive information are increasingly embedded into personal documents (e.g., passports and driver's licenses). The problem is that people are often unaware of the security and privacy risks associated with RFID, likely because the technology remains largely invisible and uncontrollable for the individual. To mitigate this problem, we developed a collection of novel yet simple and inexpensive alternative tag designs to make RFID visible and controllable. This video and demonstration illustrates these designs. For awareness, our tags provide visual, audible, or tactile feedback when in the range of an RFID reader. For control, people can allow or disallow access to the information on the tag by how they touch, orient, move, press, or illuminate the tag (for example, Figure 1 shows a tilt-sensitive RFID tag).

© All rights reserved Marquardt et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK.

 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) Proceedings of Tangible and Embedded Interaction TEI 2009 February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK.

 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK.

 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas and Hodges, Steve (2009): The peppermill: a human-powered user interface device. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 29-32. Available online

A human-powered user interface device sources its power from the physical effort required to operate it. This paper describes a technique by which a geared DC motor and a simple circuit can be used to enable interaction-powered rotary input devices. When turned, the circuit provides a temporary power source for an embedded device, and doubles as a sensor that provides information about the direction and rate of input. As a proof of concept, we have developed a general-purpose wireless input device -- called the Peppermill -- and illustrate its capabilities by using it as a remote control for a multimedia-browsing application.

© All rights reserved Villar and Hodges and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas and Hodges, Steve (2009): The peppermill: a human-powered user interface device. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 29-32. Available online

A human-powered user interface device sources its power from the physical effort required to operate it. This paper describes a technique by which a geared DC motor and a simple circuit can be used to enable interaction-powered rotary input devices. When turned, the circuit provides a temporary power source for an embedded device, and doubles as a sensor that provides information about the direction and rate of input. As a proof of concept, we have developed a general-purpose wireless input device -- called the Peppermill -- and illustrate its capabilities by using it as a remote control for a multimedia-browsing application.

© All rights reserved Villar and Hodges and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Kirk, David, Sellen, Abigail, Taylor, Stuart, Villar, Nicolas and Izadi, Shahram (2009): Putting the physical into the digital: issues in designing hybrid interactive surfaces. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 35-44. Available online

Hybrid surfaces are interactive systems combining techniques of direct-manipulation multi-touch surface interaction with elements of tangible user interfaces (TUIs). The design space for such complex hands-on computing experiences is sufficiently broad that it can be difficult to decide when interface elements should be given either a physical or digital instantiation, and the extent to which different interface functions should be made to model real-world interactions. In this paper we present two case studies of hybrid surface systems we are developing and discuss how we have reasoned through these kinds of design decisions. From this, we derive a set of observations about properties of physical and digital elements, and offer them as a design resource.

© All rights reserved Kirk et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Rosenfeld, Dan, Benko, Hrvoje, Helmes, John, Westhues, Jonathan, Hodges, Steve, Ofek, Eyal, Butler, Alex, Cao, Xiang and Chen, Billy (2009): Mouse 2.0: multi-touch meets the mouse. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2009. pp. 33-42. Available online

In this paper we present novel input devices that combine the standard capabilities of a computer mouse with multi-touch sensing. Our goal is to enrich traditional pointer-based desktop interactions with touch and gestures. To chart the design space, we present five different multi-touch mouse implementations. Each explores a different touch sensing strategy, which leads to differing form-factors and hence interactive possibilities. In addition to the detailed description of hardware and software implementations of our prototypes, we discuss the relative strengths, limitations and affordances of these novel input devices as informed by the results of a preliminary user study.

© All rights reserved Villar et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Hook, Jonathan, Taylor, Stuart, Butler, Alex, Villar, Nicolas and Izadi, Shahram (2009): A reconfigurable ferromagnetic input device. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2009. pp. 51-54. Available online

We present a novel hardware device based on ferromagnetic sensing, capable of detecting the presence, position and deformation of any ferrous object placed on or near its surface. These objects can include ball bearings, magnets, iron filings, and soft malleable bladders filled with ferrofluid. Our technology can be used to build reconfigurable input devices -- where the physical form of the input device can be assembled using combinations of such ferrous objects. This allows users to rapidly construct new forms of input device, such as a trackball-style device based on a single large ball bearing, tangible mixers based on a collection of sliders and buttons with ferrous components, and multi-touch malleable surfaces using a ferrofluid bladder. We discuss the implementation of our technology, its strengths and limitations, and potential application scenarios.

© All rights reserved Hook et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
Edit | Del

Schmidt, Albrecht, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Hoven, Elise van den, Mazalek, Ali, Holleis, Paul and Villar, Nicolas (eds.) TEI 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 18-20, 2008, Bonn, Germany.

 
Edit | Del

Seifried, Thomas, Jervis, Matthew, Haller, Michael, Masoodian, Masood and Villar, Nicolas (2008): Integration of virtual and real document organization. In: Schmidt, Albrecht, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Hoven, Elise van den, Mazalek, Ali, Holleis, Paul and Villar, Nicolas (eds.) TEI 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 18-20, 2008, Bonn, Germany. pp. 81-88. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Block, Florian, Villar, Nicolas and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2008): A malleable physical interface for copying, pasting, and organizing digital clips. In: Schmidt, Albrecht, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Hoven, Elise van den, Mazalek, Ali, Holleis, Paul and Villar, Nicolas (eds.) TEI 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 18-20, 2008, Bonn, Germany. pp. 117-120. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Izadi, Shahram, Hodges, Steve, Taylor, Stuart, Rosenfeld, Dan, Villar, Nicolas, Butler, Alex and Westhues, Jonathan (2008): Going beyond the display: a surface technology with an electronically switchable diffuser. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 269-278. Available online

2007
 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2007): A malleable control structure for softwired user interfaces. In: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2007. pp. 49-56. Available online

Rather than existing as a computer input device with a rigid shape, a predetermined selection of controls and a fixed layout, a malleable control structure is made up of a set of controls that can be freely arranged on control areas. The structure is physically adaptable by users during operation: control areas and controls can be introduced, organized and removed to suit interaction requirements and personal preference. We present an implementation of a malleable control structure called VoodooIO. Our design contributes a novel material -- the network substrate -- that can be used to transform everyday surfaces into control areas, and the concept of implementing basic control units (such as buttons, sliders or dials) as ad hoc network nodes. VoodooIO does not constitute an application interface in itself. Like any input device, it only becomes concrete as an interface component in the context of a particular application. We introduce the concept of softwiring as a collection of techniques and practices that allow users to benefit from malleable control interfaces in a number of concrete scenarios of use.

© All rights reserved Villar and Gellersen and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Spiessl, Wolfgang, Villar, Nicolas, Gellersen, Hans-Werner and Schmidt, Albrecht (2007): VoodooFlash: authoring across physical and digital form. In: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2007. pp. 97-100. Available online

Design tools that integrate hardware and software components facilitate product design work across aspects of physical form and user interaction, but at the cost of requiring designers to work with other than their accustomed programming tools. In this paper we introduce VoodooFlash, a tool designed to build on the widespread use of Flash while facilitating design work across physical and digital components. VoodooFlash extends the existing practice of authoring interactive applications in terms of arranging components on a virtual stage, and provides a physical stage on which controls can be arranged, linked to software components, and appropriated with other physical design materials.

© All rights reserved Spiessl et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas, Gilleade, Kiel Mark, Ramduny-Ellis, Devina and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2007): The VoodooIO gaming kit: a real-time adaptable gaming controller. In Computers in Entertainment, 5 (3) . Available online

2006
 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas, Gilleade, Kiel Mark, Ramduny-Ellis, Devina and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2006): The VoodooIO gaming kit: a real-time adaptable gaming controller. In: Ishii, Hiroshi, Lee, Newton, Natkin, Stphane and Tsushima, Katsuhide (eds.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2006 June 14-16, 2006, Hollywood, California, USA. p. 1. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas, Gilleade, Kiel Mark, Ramduny-Ellis, Devina and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2006): The VoodooIO gaming kit: a real-time adaptable gaming controller. In: Ishii, Hiroshi, Lee, Newton, Natkin, Stphane and Tsushima, Katsuhide (eds.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2006 June 14-16, 2006, Hollywood, California, USA. p. 82. Available online

2004
 
Edit | Del

Block, Florian, Schmidt, Albrecht, Villar, Nicolas and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2004): Towards a Playful User Interface for Home Entertainment Systems. In: Markopoulos, Panos, Eggen, Berry, Aarts, Emile H. L. and Crowley, James L. (eds.) EUSAI 2004 - Ambient Intelligence - Second European Symposium November 8-11, 2004, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. pp. 207-217. Available online

2003
 
Edit | Del

Laerhoven, Kristof van, Villar, Nicolas, Schmidt, Albrecht, Kortuem, Gerd and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2003): Using an autonomous cube for basic navigation and input. In: Oviatt, Sharon L., Darrell, Trevor, Maybury, Mark T. and Wahlster, Wolfgang (eds.) Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2003 November 5-7, 2003, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 203-210. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Laerhoven, Kristof van, Villar, Nicolas, Schmidt, Albrecht, Kortuem, Gerd and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2003): Using an autonomous cube for basic navigation and input. In: Proceedings of the 2003 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2003. pp. 203-210. Available online

This paper presents a low-cost and practical approach to achieve basic input using a tactile cube-shaped object, augmented with a set of sensors, processor, batteries and wireless communication. The algorithm we propose combines a finite state machine model incorporating prior knowledge about the symmetrical structure of the cube, with maximum likelihood estimation using multivariate Gaussians. The claim that the presented solution is cheap, fast and requires few resources, is demonstrated by implementation in a small-sized, microcontroller-driven hardware configuration with inexpensive sensors. We conclude with a few prototyped applications that aim at characterizing how the familiar and elementary shape of the cube allows it to be used as an interaction device.

© All rights reserved Laerhoven et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Villar, Nicolas, Schmidt, Albrecht, Kortuem, Gerd and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (2003): Interacting with proactive public displays. In Computers & Graphics, 27 (6) pp. 849-857. Available online

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/nicolas_villar.html