Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2012
Pub. count:32
Number of co-authors:45



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Nicholas Diakopoulos:6
Rahul Nair:6
Shane Ahern:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mor Naaman's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Hector Garcia-Moli..:47
Susanne Boll:45
Andreas Paepcke:43
 
 
 

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Mor Naaman

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http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~mor/

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Publications by Mor Naaman (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Lingel, Jessica, Trammell, Aaron, Sanchez, Joe and Naaman, Mor (2012): Practices of information and secrecy in a punk rock subculture. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 157-166.

By examining the information practices of a punk-rock subculture, we investigate the limits of social media systems, particularly limits exposed by practices of secrecy. Looking at the exchange of information about "underground" shows, we use qualitative interviews to examine uses of social media among fans. This initial analysis centers on understanding the tactical practices of information and technology to avoid police detection, particularly by comparing uses of more traditional online forums, such as message boards, with social network sites, such as Facebook. Understanding the uses and preferences for distinct technologies sheds light on how localized social context drives technological use. These findings are furthermore useful in their implications for design of applications sensitive to granular needs of users for secrecy.

© All rights reserved Lingel et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Choudhury, Munmun De, Diakopoulos, Nicholas and Naaman, Mor (2012): Unfolding the event landscape on twitter: classification and exploration of user categories. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 241-244.

Social media platforms such as Twitter garner significant attention from very large audiences in response to real-world events. Automatically establishing who is participating in information production or conversation around events can improve event content consumption, help expose the stakeholders in the event and their varied interests, and even help steer subsequent coverage of an event by journalists. In this paper, we take initial steps towards building an automatic classifier for user types on Twitter, focusing on three core user categories that are reflective of the information production and consumption processes around events: organizations, journalists/media bloggers, and ordinary individuals. Exploration of the user categories on a range of events shows distinctive characteristics in terms of the proportion of each user type, as well as differences in the nature of content each shared around the events.

© All rights reserved Choudhury et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kivran-Swaine, Funda, Brody, Sam, Diakopoulos, Nicholas and Naaman, Mor (2012): Of joy and gender: emotional expression in online social networks. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 139-142.

In this study, we analyzed the language use on Twitter personal exchanges as well as properties of the users' networks, to study the influence of gender composition on expressions of positive emotions while controlling for the strength of connection between the conversing users. Our findings show that compared to men, women express positive emotions more, especially when interacting with other women. Our findings help the understanding of gender-driven communication patterns in social media, and offer insights for the study of emotion and language.

© All rights reserved Kivran-Swaine et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Diakopoulos, Nicholas and Naaman, Mor (2011): Towards quality discourse in online news comments. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 133-142.

With the growth in sociality and interaction around online news media, news sites are increasingly becoming places for communities to discuss and address common issues spurred by news articles. The quality of online news comments is of importance to news organizations that want to provide a valuable exchange of community ideas and maintain credibility within the community. In this work we examine the complex interplay between the needs and desires of news commenters with the functioning of different journalistic approaches toward managing comment quality. Drawing primarily on newsroom interviews and reader surveys, we characterize the comment discourse of SacBee.com, discuss the relationship of comment quality to both the consumption and production of news information, and provide a description of both readers' and writers' motivations for usage of news comments. We also examine newsroom strategies for dealing with comment quality as well as explore tensions and opportunities for value-sensitive innovation within such online communities.

© All rights reserved Diakopoulos and Naaman and/or their publisher

 
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Kivran-Swaine, Funda and Naaman, Mor (2011): Network properties and social sharing of emotions in social awareness streams. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 379-382.

The relationship between social sharing of emotions, social networks and social ties is an ongoing topic of research. Such sharing of emotions occurs frequently in "social awareness streams" platforms like Twitter and Facebook. We use Twitter to address research questions about the association of properties of a user's network, such as size and density, with expression of emotion in the user's Twitter posts. Our analysis suggests that expression of emotion can explain some of the variance in users' Twitter networks, and that the use of emotion in interactions between users is a strong explaining factor.

© All rights reserved Kivran-Swaine and Naaman and/or their publisher

 
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Kivran-Swaine, Funda, Govindan, Priya and Naaman, Mor (2011): The impact of network structure on breaking ties in online social networks: unfollowing on Twitter. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1101-1104.

We investigate the breaking of ties between individuals in the online social network of Twitter, a hugely popular social media service. Building on sociology concepts such as strength of ties, embeddedness, and status, we explore how network structure alone influences tie breaks - the common phenomena of an individual ceasing to "follow" another in Twitter's directed social network. We examine these relationships using a dataset of 245,586 Twitter "follow" edges, and the persistence of these edges after nine months. We show that structural properties of individuals and dyads at Time 1 have a significant effect on the existence of edges at Time 2, and connect these findings to the social theories that motivated the study.

© All rights reserved Kivran-Swaine et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Diakopoulos, Nicholas, Kivran-Swaine, Funda and Naaman, Mor (2011): Playable data: characterizing the design space of game-y infographics. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1717-1726.

This work explores the intersection between infographics and games by examining how to embed meaningful visual analytic interactions into game mechanics that in turn impact user behavior around a data-driven graphic. In contrast to other methods of narrative visualization, games provide an alternate method for structuring a story, not bound by a linear arrangement but still providing structure via rules, goals, and mechanics of play. We designed two different versions of a game-y infographic, Salubrious Nation, and compared them to a non-game-y version in an online experiment. We assessed the relative merits of the game-y approach of presentation in terms of exploration of the visualization, insights and learning, and enjoyment of the experience. Based on our results, we discuss some of the benefits and drawbacks of our designs. More generally, we identify challenges and opportunities for further exploration of this new design space.

© All rights reserved Diakopoulos et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Diakopoulos, Nicholas and Naaman, Mor (2011): Topicality, time, and sentiment in online news comments. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1405-1410.

In this paper we examine the relationships between news comment topicality, temporality, sentiment, and quality in a dataset of 54,540 news comments. Initial observations indicate that comment sentiments, both positive and negative, can be useful indicators of discourse quality, and that aggregate temporal patterns in positive sentiment exist on comment threads.

© All rights reserved Diakopoulos and Naaman and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Naaman, Mor, Boase, Jeffrey and Lai, Chih-Hui (2010): Is it really about me?: message content in social awareness streams. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 189-192.

In this work we examine the characteristics of social activity and patterns of communication on Twitter, a prominent example of the emerging class of communication systems we call "social awareness streams." We use system data and message content from over 350 Twitter users, applying human coding and quantitative analysis to provide a deeper understanding of the activity of individuals on the Twitter network. In particular, we develop a content-based categorization of the type of messages posted by Twitter users, based on which we examine users' activity. Our analysis shows two common types of user behavior in terms of the content of the posted messages, and exposes differences between users in respect to these activities.

© All rights reserved Naaman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Yu, Zihao, Diakopoulos, Nicholas and Naaman, Mor (2010): The multiplayer: multi-perspective social video navigation. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 413-414.

We present a multi-perspective video "multiplayer" designed to organize social video aggregated from online sites like YouTube. Our system automatically time-aligns videos using audio fingerprinting, thus bringing them into a unified temporal frame. The interface utilizes social metadata to visually aid navigation and cue users to more interesting portions of an event. We provide details about the visual and interaction design rationale of the multiplayer.

© All rights reserved Yu et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Kennedy, Lyndon and Naaman, Mor (2009): Less talk, more rock: automated organization of community-contributed collections of concert videos. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2009. pp. 311-320.

We describe a system for synchronization and organization of user-contributed content from live music events. We start with a set of short video clips taken at a single event by multiple contributors, who were using a varied set of capture devices. Using audio fingerprints, we synchronize these clips such that overlapping clips can be displayed simultaneously. Furthermore, we use the timing and link structure generated by the synchronization algorithm to improve the findability and representation of the event content, including identifying key moments of interest and descriptive text for important captured segments of the show. We also identify the preferred audio track when multiple clips overlap. We thus create a much improved representation of the event that builds on the automatic content match. Our work demonstrates important principles in the use of content analysis techniques for social media content on the Web, and applies those principles in the domain of live music capture.

© All rights reserved Kennedy and Naaman and/or ACM Press

 
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Marchand-Maillet, Stphane, Vries, Arjen P. de and Naaman, Mor (2009): Workshop on Information Retrieval over Social Networks. In: Boughanem, Mohand, Berrut, Catherine, Mothe, Josiane and Soul-Dupuy, Chantal (eds.) Advances in Information Retrieval - 31th European Conference on IR Research - ECIR 2009 April 6-9, 2009, 2009, Toulouse, France. p. 803.

 
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Rattenbury, Tye and Naaman, Mor (2009): Methods for extracting place semantics from Flickr tags. In ACM Transactions on the Web, 3 (1) p. 1.

We describe an approach for extracting semantics for tags, unstructured text-labels assigned to resources on the Web, based on each tag's usage patterns. In particular, we focus on the problem of extracting place semantics for tags that are assigned to photos on Flickr, a popular-photo sharing Web site that supports location (latitude/longitude) metadata for photos. We propose the adaptation of two baseline methods, inspired by well-known burst-analysis techniques, for the task; we also describe two novel methods, TagMaps and scale-structure identification. We evaluate the methods on a subset of Flickr data. We show that our scale-structure identification method outperforms existing techniques and that a hybrid approach generates further improvements (achieving 85% precision at 81% recall). The approach and methods described in this work can be used in other domains such as geo-annotated Web pages, where text terms can be extracted and associated with usage patterns.

© All rights reserved Rattenbury and Naaman and/or ACM

2008
 
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Nov, Oded, Naaman, Mor and Ye, Chen (2008): What drives content tagging: the case of photos on Flickr. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1097-1100.

We examine tagging behavior on Flickr, a public photo-sharing website. We build on previous qualitative research that exposed a taxonomy of tagging motivations, as well as on social presence research. The motivation taxonomy suggests that motivations for tagging are tied to the intended target audience of the tags -- the users themselves, family and friends, or the general public. Using multiple data sources, including a survey and independent system data, we examine which motivations are associated with tagging level, and estimate the magnitude of their contribution. We find that the levels of the Self and Public motivations, together with social presence indicators, are positively correlated with tagging level; Family&Friends motivations are not significantly correlated with tagging. The findings and the use of survey method carry implications for designers of tagging and other social systems on the web.

© All rights reserved Nov et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Naaman, Mor, Nair, Rahul and Kaplun, Vlad (2008): Photos on the go: a mobile application case study. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1739-1748.

We designed and iterated on a photo browsing application for high-end mobile phones. The application, Zurfer, supports viewing of photos from the user, their contacts, and the general user population. Photos are organized using a channel metaphor, driven by multiple dimensions: social, spatial and topical. Zurfer was deployed to over 500 users; extensive user research was conducted with nine participants. The data from the deployment and the study exposes general themes of mobile application use, as well as requirements for mobile applications in the photos domain, mobile social applications, and entertainment-driven mobile applications.

© All rights reserved Naaman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kennedy, Lyndon S. and Naaman, Mor (2008): Generating diverse and representative image search results for landmarks. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2008. pp. 297-306.

Can we leverage the community-contributed collections of rich media on the web to automatically generate representative and diverse views of the world's landmarks? We use a combination of context- and content-based tools to generate representative sets of images for location-driven features and landmarks, a common search task. To do that, we using location and other metadata, as well as tags associated with images, and the images' visual features. We present an approach to extracting tags that represent landmarks. We show how to use unsupervised methods to extract representative views and images for each landmark. This approach can potentially scale to provide better search and representation for landmarks, worldwide. We evaluate the system in the context of image search using a real-life dataset of 110,000 images from the San Francisco area.

© All rights reserved Kennedy and Naaman and/or ACM Press

 
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Boll, Susanne, Jones, Christopher, Kansa, Eric, Kishor, Puneet, Naaman, Mor, Purves, Ross, Scharl, Arno and Wilde, Erik (2008): Location and the web (LocWeb 2008). In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2008. pp. 1261-1262.

The World Wide Web has become the world's largest networked information resource, but references to geographical locations remain unstructured and typically implicit in nature. This lack of explicit spatial knowledge within the Web makes it difficult to service user needs for location-specific information. At present, spatial knowledge is hidden in many small information fragments such as addresses on Web pages, annotated photos with GPS co-ordinates, geographic mapping applications, and geotags in user-generated content. Several emerging formats that primarily or secondarily include location metadata, like GeoRSS, KML, and microformats, aim to improve this state of affairs. However, the question remains how to extract, index, mine, find, view, mashup, and exploit Web content using its location semantics. This work-shop brings together researchers from academia and industry labs to discuss and present the latest results and trends in all facets of the relationships between location concepts and Web information.

© All rights reserved Boll et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Ahern, Shane, Eckles, Dean, Good, Nathaniel, King, Simon, Naaman, Mor and Nair, Rahul (2007): Over-exposed?: privacy patterns and considerations in online and mobile photo sharing. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 357-366.

As sharing personal media online becomes easier and widely spread, new privacy concerns emerge -- especially when the persistent nature of the media and associated context reveals details about the physical and social context in which the media items were created. In a first-of-its-kind study, we use context-aware camerephone devices to examine privacy decisions in mobile and online photo sharing. Through data analysis on a corpus of privacy decisions and associated context data from a real-world system, we identify relationships between location of photo capture and photo privacy settings. Our data analysis leads to further questions which we investigate through a set of interviews with 15 users. The interviews reveal common themes in privacy considerations: security, social disclosure, identity and convenience. Finally, we highlight several implications and opportunities for design of media sharing applications, including using past privacy patterns to prevent oversights and errors.

© All rights reserved Ahern et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ames, Morgan and Naaman, Mor (2007): Why we tag: motivations for annotation in mobile and online media. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 971-980.

Why do people tag? Users have mostly avoided annotating media such as photos -- both in desktop and mobile environments -- despite the many potential uses for annotations, including recall and retrieval. We investigate the incentives for annotation in Flickr, a popular web-based photo-sharing system, and ZoneTag, a cameraphone photo capture and annotation tool that uploads images to Flickr. In Flickr, annotation (as textual tags) serves both personal and social purposes, increasing incentives for tagging and resulting in a relatively high number of annotations. ZoneTag, in turn, makes it easier to tag cameraphone photos that are uploaded to Flickr by allowing annotation and suggesting relevant tags immediately after capture. A qualitative study of ZoneTag/Flickr users exposed various tagging patterns and emerging motivations for photo annotation. We offer a taxonomy of motivations for annotation in this system along two dimensions (sociality and function), and explore the various factors that people consider when tagging their photos. Our findings suggest implications for the design of digital photo organization and sharing applications, as well as other applications that incorporate user-based annotation.

© All rights reserved Ames and Naaman and/or ACM Press

 
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Ahern, Shane, Naaman, Mor, Nair, Rahul and Yang, Jeannie Hui-I (2007): World explorer: visualizing aggregate data from unstructured text in geo-referenced collections. In: JCDL07: Proceedings of the 7th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2007. pp. 1-10.

The availability of map interfaces and location-aware devices makes a growing amount of unstructured, geo-referenced information available on the Web. This type of information can be valuable not only for browsing, finding and making sense of individual items, but also in aggregate form to help understand data trends and features. In particular, over twenty million geo-referenced photos are now available on Flickr, a photo-sharing website -- the first major collection of its kind. These photos are often associated with user-entered unstructured text labels (i.e., tags). We show how we analyze the tags associated with the geo-referenced Flickr images to generate aggregate knowledge in the form of "representative tags" for arbitrary areas in the world. We use these tags to create a visualization tool, World Explorer, that can help expose the content of the data, using a map interface to display the derived tags and the original photo items. We perform a qualitative evaluation of World Explorer that outlines the visualization's benefits in browsing this type of content. We provide insights regarding the aggregate versus individual-item requirements in browsing digital geo-referenced material.

© All rights reserved Ahern et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Rattenbury, Tye, Good, Nathan and Naaman, Mor (2007): Towards extracting flickr tag semantics. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2007. pp. 1287-1288.

We address the problem of extracting semantics of tags -- short, unstructured text-labels assigned to resources on the Web -- based on each tag's metadata patterns. In particular, we describe an approach for extracting place and event semantics for tags that are assigned to photos on Flickr, a popular photo sharing website supporting time and location (latitude/longitude) metadata. The approach can be generalized to other domains where text terms can be extracted and associated with metadata patterns, such as geo-annotated web pages.

© All rights reserved Rattenbury et al. and/or International World Wide Web Conference Committee

 
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Ahern, Shane, King, Simon, Naaman, Mor and Nair, Rahul (2007): Summarization of online image collections via implicit feedback. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2007. pp. 1325-1326.

The availability of map interfaces and location-aware devices makes a growing amount of unstructured, geo-referenced information available on the Web. In particular, over twelve million geo-referenced photos are now available on Flickr, a popular photo-sharing website. We show a method to analyze the Flickr data and generate aggregate knowledge in the form of "representative tags" for arbitrary areas in the world. We display these tags on a map interface in an interactive web application along with images associated with each tag. We then use the implicit feedback of the aggregate user interactions with the tags and images to learn which images best describe the area shown on the map.

© All rights reserved Ahern et al. and/or International World Wide Web Conference Committee

 
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Rattenbury, Tye, Good, Nathaniel and Naaman, Mor (2007): Towards automatic extraction of event and place semantics from Flickr tags. In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2007. pp. 103-110.

We describe an approach for extracting semantics of tags, unstructured text-labels assigned to resources on the Web, based on each tag's usage patterns. In particular, we focus on the problem of extracting place and event semantics for tags that are assigned to photos on Flickr, a popular photo sharing website that supports time and location (latitude/longitude) metadata. We analyze two methods inspired by well-known burst-analysis techniques and one novel method: Scale-structure Identification. We evaluate the methods on a subset of Flickr data, and show that our Scale-structure Identification method outperforms the existing techniques. The approach and methods described in this work can be used in other domains such as geo-annotated web pages, where text terms can be extracted and associated with usage patterns.

© All rights reserved Rattenbury et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hwang, Amy, Ahern, Shane, King, Simon, Naaman, Mor, Nair, Rahul and Yang, Jeannie Hui-I (2007): Zurfer: mobile multimedia access in spatial, social and topical context. In: Lienhart, Rainer, Prasad, Anand R., Hanjalic, Alan, Choi, Sunghyun, Bailey, Brian P. and Sebe, Nicu (eds.) Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Multimedia 2007 September 24-29, 2007, Augsburg, Germany. pp. 557-560.

 
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Kennedy, Lyndon S., Naaman, Mor, Ahern, Shane, Nair, Rahul and Rattenbury, Tye (2007): How flickr helps us make sense of the world: context and content in community-contributed media collections. In: Lienhart, Rainer, Prasad, Anand R., Hanjalic, Alan, Choi, Sunghyun, Bailey, Brian P. and Sebe, Nicu (eds.) Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Multimedia 2007 September 24-29, 2007, Augsburg, Germany. pp. 631-640.

2006
 
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Marlow, Cameron, Naaman, Mor, boyd, danah and Davis, Marc (2006): HT06, tagging paper, taxonomy, Flickr, academic article, to read. In: Proceedings of the Seventeenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2006. pp. 31-40.

In recent years, tagging systems have become increasingly popular. These systems enable users to add keywords (i.e., "tags") to Internet resources (e.g., web pages, images, videos) without relying on a controlled vocabulary. Tagging systems have the potential to improve search, spam detection, reputation systems, and personal organization while introducing new modalities of social communication and opportunities for data mining. This potential is largely due to the social structure that underlies many of the current systems. Despite the rapid expansion of applications that support tagging of resources, tagging systems are still not well studied or understood. In this paper, we provide a short description of the academic related work to date. We offer a model of tagging systems, specifically in the context of web-based systems, to help us illustrate the possible benefits of these tools. Since many such systems already exist, we provide a taxonomy of tagging systems to help inform their analysis and design, and thus enable researchers to frame and compare evidence for the sustainability of such systems. We also provide a simple taxonomy of incentives and contribution models to inform potential evaluative frameworks. While this work does not present comprehensive empirical results, we present a preliminary study of the photo-sharing and tagging system Flickr to demonstrate our model and explore some of the issues in one sample system. This analysis helps us outline and motivate possible future directions of research in tagging systems.

© All rights reserved Marlow et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Naaman, Mor (2006): Eyes on the World. In IEEE Computer, 39 (10) pp. 108-111.

 
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Jaffe, Alexander, Naaman, Mor, Tassa, Tamir and Davis, Marc (2006): Generating summaries for large collections of geo-referenced photographs. In: Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2006. pp. 853-854.

We describe a framework for automatically selecting a summary set of photographs from a large collection of geo-referenced photos. The summary algorithm is based on spatial patterns in photo sets, but can be expanded to support social, temporal, as well as textual-topical factors of the photo set. The summary set can be biased by the user, the content of the user's query, and the context in which the query is made. An initial evaluation on a set of geo-referenced photos shows that our algorithm performs well, producing results that are highly rated by users.

© All rights reserved Jaffe et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Naaman, Mor, Song, Yee Jiun, Paepcke, Andreas and Garcia-Molina, Hector (2004): Automatic organization for digital photographs with geographic coordinates. In: JCDL04: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2004. pp. 53-62.

We describe PhotoCompas, a system that utilizes the time and location information embedded in digital photographs to automatically organize a personal photo collection PhotoCompas produces browseable location and event hierarchies for the collection. These hierarchies are created using algorithms that interleave time and location to produce an organization that mimics the way people think about their photo collections. In addition, our algorithm annotates the generated hierarchy with geographical names. We tested our approach in case studies of three real-world collections and verified that the results are meaningful and useful for the collection owners.

© All rights reserved Naaman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Harada, Susumu, Naaman, Mor, Song, Yee Jiun, Wang, Qianying and Paepcke, Andreas (2004): Lost in memories: interacting with photo collections on PDAs. In: JCDL04: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2004. pp. 325-333.

We developed two browsers to support large personal photo collections on PDAs. Our first browser is based on a traditional, folder-based layout that utilizes either the user's manually created organization structure, or a system-generated structure. Our second browser uses a novel interface that is based on a vertical, zoomable timeline. This timeline browser does not require users to organize their photos, but instead, relies solely on system-generated structure. Our system creates a hierarchical structure of the user's photos by applying time-based clustering to identify subsets of photos that are likely to be related. In a user experiment, we compared users' searching and browsing performance across these browsers, using each user's own photo collection. Photo collection sizes varied between 500 and 3000 photographs Our results show that our timeline browser is at least as effective for searching and browsing tasks as a traditional browser that requires users to manually organize their photos.

© All rights reserved Harada et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Naaman, Mor, Harada, Susumu, Wang, Qianying, Garcia-Molina, Hector and Paepcke, Andreas (2004): Context data in geo-referenced digital photo collections. In: Schulzrinne, Henning, Dimitrova, Nevenka, Sasse, Martina Angela, Moon, Sue B. and Lienhart, Rainer (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th ACM International Conference on Multimedia October 10-16, 2004, New York, NY, USA. pp. 196-203.

 
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Naaman, Mor, Song, Yee Jiun, Paepcke, Andreas and Garcia-Molina, Hector (2004): Automatically generating metadata for digital photographs with geographic coordinates. In: Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2004. pp. 244-245.

Given location information on digital photographs, we can automatically generate an abundance of photo-related metadata using off-the-shelf and web-based data sources. These metadata can serve as additional memory cues and filters when browsing a personal or global collection of photos.

© All rights reserved Naaman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2012
Pub. count:32
Number of co-authors:45



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Nicholas Diakopoulos:6
Rahul Nair:6
Shane Ahern:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mor Naaman's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Hector Garcia-Moli..:47
Susanne Boll:45
Andreas Paepcke:43
 
 
 

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