Publication statistics

Pub. period:1998-2012
Pub. count:30
Number of co-authors:68



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Steve Benford:17
Chris Greenhalgh:10
Jon Hindmarsh:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mike Fraser's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Benford:121
Carl Gutwin:116
Tom Rodden:106
 
 
 

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Mike Fraser

Has also published under the name of:
"M. Fraser"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.cs.bris.ac.uk/~fraser/

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Publications by Mike Fraser (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Bennett, Peter, Fraser, Mike and Balaam, Madeline (2012): ChronoTape: tangible timelines for family history. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2012. pp. 49-56.

An explosion in the availability of online records has led to surging interest in genealogy. In this paper we explore the present state of genealogical practice, with a particular focus on how the process of research is recorded and later accessed by other researchers. We then present our response, ChronoTape, a novel tangible interface for supporting family history research. The ChronoTape is an example of a temporal tangible interface, an interface designed to enable the tangible representation and control of time. We use the ChronoTape to interrogate the value relationships between physical and digital materials, personal and professional practices, and the ways that records are produced, maintained and ultimately inherited. In contrast to designs that support existing genealogical practice, ChronoTape captures and embeds traces of the researcher within the document of their own research, in three ways: (i) it ensures physical traces of digital research; (ii) it generates personal material around the use of impersonal genealogical data; (iii) it allows for graceful degradation of both its physical and digital components in order to deliberately accommodate the passage of information into the future.

© All rights reserved Bennett et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cauchard, Jessica, Lochtefeld, Markus, Fraser, Mike, Krger, Antonio and Subramanian, Sriram (2012): m+pSpaces: virtual workspaces in the spatially-aware mobile environment. In: Proceedings of the 14th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2012. pp. 171-180.

We introduce spatially-aware virtual workspaces for the mobile environment. The notion of virtual workspaces was initially conceived to alleviate mental workload in desktop environments with limited display real-estate. Using spatial properties of mobile devices, we translate this approach and illustrate that mobile virtual workspaces greatly improve task performance for mobile devices. In a first study, we compare our spatially-aware prototype (mSpaces) to existing context switching methods for navigating amongst multiple tasks in the mobile environment. We show that users are faster, make more accurate decisions and require less mental and physical effort when using spatially-aware prototypes. We furthermore prototype pSpaces and m+pSpaces, two spatially-aware systems equipped with pico-projectors as auxiliary displays to provide dual-display capability to the handheld device. A final study reveals advantages of each of the different configurations and functionalities when comparing all three prototypes. Drawing on these findings, we identify design considerations to create, manipulate and manage spatially-aware virtual workspaces in the mobile environment.

© All rights reserved Cauchard et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Cauchard, Jessica R., Lochtefeld, Markus, Irani, Pourang, Schoening, Johannes, Krger, Antonio, Fraser, Mike and Subramanian, Sriram (2011): Visual separation in mobile multi-display environments. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 451-460.

Projector phones, handheld game consoles and many other mobile devices increasingly include more than one display, and therefore present a new breed of mobile Multi-Display Environments (MDEs) to users. Existing studies illustrate the effects of visual separation between displays in MDEs and suggest interaction techniques that mitigate these effects. Currently, mobile devices with heterogeneous displays such as projector phones are often designed without reference to visual separation issues; therefore it is critical to establish whether concerns and opportunities raised in the existing MDE literature apply to the emerging category of Mobile MDEs (MMDEs). This paper investigates the effects of visual separation in the context of MMDEs and contrasts these with fixed MDE results, and explores design factors for Mobile MDEs. Our study uses a novel eye-tracking methodology for measuring switches in visual context between displays and identifies that MMDEs offer increased design flexibility over traditional MDEs in terms of visual separation. We discuss these results and identify several design implications.

© All rights reserved Cauchard et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Riek, Laurel D., Rabinowitch, Tal-Chen, Bremner, Paul, Pipe, Anthony G., Fraser, Mike and Robinson, Peter (2010): Cooperative gestures: effective signaling for humanoid robots. In: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2010. pp. 61-68.

Cooperative gestures are a key aspect of human-human pro-social interaction. Thus, it is reasonable to expect that endowing humanoid robots with the ability to use such gestures when interacting with humans would be useful. However, while people are used to responding to such gestures expressed by other humans, it is unclear how they might react to a robot making them. To explore this topic, we conducted a within-subjects, video based laboratory experiment, measuring time to cooperate with a humanoid robot making interactional gestures. We manipulated the gesture type (beckon, give, shake hands), the gesture style (smooth, abrupt), and the gesture orientation (front, side). We also employed two measures of individual differences: negative attitudes toward robots (NARS) and human gesture decoding ability (DANVA2-POS). Our results show that people cooperate with abrupt gestures more quickly than smooth ones and front-oriented gestures more quickly than those made to the side, people's speed at decoding robot gestures is correlated with their ability to decode human gestures, and negative attitudes toward robots is strongly correlated with a decreased ability in decoding human gestures.

© All rights reserved Riek et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK.

 
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Boari, Douglas and Fraser, Mike (2009): Taking shortcuts: embedded physical interfaces for spatial navigation. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 189-196.

 
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Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) Proceedings of Tangible and Embedded Interaction TEI 2009 February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK.

 
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Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK.

2008
 
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Fraser, Mike, Cater, Kirsten and Duff, Paul (2008): Using actuated devices in location-aware systems. In: Schmidt, Albrecht, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Hoven, Elise van den, Mazalek, Ali, Holleis, Paul and Villar, Nicolas (eds.) TEI 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 18-20, 2008, Bonn, Germany. pp. 19-26.

 
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Pearson, Will and Fraser, Mike (2008): Collaborative Identification of Haptic-Only Objects. In: Ferre, Manuel (ed.) EuroHaptics 2008 - Haptics Perception, Devices and Scenarios - 6th International Conference June 10-13, 2008, Madrid, Spain. pp. 806-819.

 
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Fraser, Mike, Duff, Paul and Pearson, Will (2008): Grounding Mobile Force Feedback in the Real World. In: Ferre, Manuel (ed.) EuroHaptics 2008 - Haptics Perception, Devices and Scenarios - 6th International Conference June 10-13, 2008, Madrid, Spain. pp. 514-522.

2007
 
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Fraser, Mike, McCarthy, Michael R., Shaukat, Muneeb and Smith, Phillip (2007): Seconds matter: improving distributed coordination bytracking and visualizing display trajectories. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1303-1312.

Pauses in distributed groupware activity can indicate anything from technical latency through infrastructure failure to a participant's thoughtful contemplation. Unraveling these ambiguities highlights mismatches between unseen off-screen activities and on-screen cursor behaviors. In this paper we suggest that groupware systems have typically been poor at representing off-screen activities, and introduce the concept of display trajectories to bridge the sensor gap between the display and its surrounding space. We consider requirements for display trajectories using the distributed social scientific analysis of video data as an example domain. Drawing on these requirements, we prototype a freeform whiteboard pen tracking and visualization technique around displays using ultrasound. We describe an experiment which inspects the impact of display trajectories on remote response efficiency. Our findings show that visualization of the display trajectory improves participants' ability to coordinate their actions by one second per interaction turn, reducing latency in organizing turn taking by a 'standard maximum' conversation pause.

© All rights reserved Fraser et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Tutt, Dylan, Hindmarsh, Jon, Shaukat, Muneeb and Fraser, Mike (2007): The Distributed Work of Local Action: Interaction amongst virtually collocated research teams. In: Proceedings of the Tenth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2007. pp. 199-218.

Existing research on synchronous remote working in CSCW has highlighted the troubles that can arise because actions at one site are (partially) unavailable to remote colleagues. Such 'local action' is routinely characterised as a nuisance, a distraction, subordinate and the like. This paper explores interconnections between 'local action' and 'distributed work' in the case of a research team virtually collocated through 'MiMeG'. MiMeG is an e-Social Science tool that facilitates 'distributed data sessions' in which social scientists are able to remotely collaborate on the real-time analysis of video data. The data are visible and controllable in a shared workspace and participants are additionally connected via audio conferencing. The findings reveal that whilst the (partial) unavailability of local action is at times problematic, it is also used as a resource for coordinating work. The paper considers how local action is interactionally managed in distributed data sessions and concludes by outlining implications of the analysis for the design and study of technologies to support group-to-group collaboration.

© All rights reserved Tutt et al. and/or Springer

 
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Shin, Peter, Jasso, Hector, Tilak, Sameer, Cotofana, Neil, Fountain, Tony, Yan, Linjun, Fraser, Mike and Elgamal, Ahmed (2007): Automatic Vehicle Type Classification Using Strain Gauge Sensors. In: PerCom Workshops 2007 - Fifth Annual IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications 19-23 March, 2007, White Plains, New York, USA. pp. 425-428.

2006
 
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Fraser, Mike, Hindmarsh, Jon, Best, Katie, Heath, Christian, Biegel, Greg, Greenhalgh, Chris and Reeves, Stuart (2006): Remote Collaboration Over Video Data: Towards Real-Time e-Social Science. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 15 (4) pp. 257-279.

The design of distributed systems to support collaboration among groups of scientists raises new networking challenges that grid middleware developers are addressing. This field of development work, 'e-Science', is increasingly recognising the critical need of understanding the ordinary day-to-day work of doing research to inform design. We have investigated one particular area of collaborative social scientific work -- the analysis of video data. Based on interviews and observational studies, we discuss current practices of social scientific work with digital video in three areas: Preparation for collaboration; Control of data and application; and Annotation configurations and techniques. For each, we describe how these requirements feature in our design of a distributed video analysis system as part of the MiMeG project: our security policy and distribution; the design of the control system; and providing freeform annotation over data. Finally, we review our design in light of initial use of the software between project partners; and discuss how we might transform the spatial configuration of the system to support annotation behaviour.

© All rights reserved Fraser et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

2005
 
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Reeves, Stuart, Benford, Steve, O'Malley, Claire and Fraser, Mike (2005): Designing the spectator experience. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 741-750.

Interaction is increasingly a public affair, taking place in our theatres, galleries, museums, exhibitions and on the city streets. This raises a new design challenge for HCI - how should spectators experience a performer's interaction with a computer? We classify public interfaces (including examples from art, performance and exhibition design) according to the extent to which a performer's manipulations of an interface and their resulting effects are hidden, partially revealed, fully revealed or even amplified for spectators. Our taxonomy uncovers four broad design strategies: 'secretive,' where manipulations and effects are largely hidden; 'expressive,' where they tend to be revealed enabling the spectator to fully appreciate the performer's interaction; 'magical,' where effects are revealed but the manipulations that caused them are hidden; and finally 'suspenseful,' where manipulations are apparent but effects are only revealed as the spectator takes their turn.

© All rights reserved Reeves et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Gutwin, Carl, Benford, Steve, Dyck, Jeff, Fraser, Mike, Vaghi, Ivan and Greenhalgh, Chris (2004): Revealing delay in collaborative environments. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 503-510.

Delay is an unavoidable reality in collaborative environments. We propose an approach to dealing with delay in which 'decorators' are introduced into the interface. Decorators show the presence, magnitude and effects of delay so that participants can better understand its consequences and adopt their own natural coping strategies. Two experiments with different decorators show that this approach can significantly reduce errors in specific collaborative activities. We conclude that revealing delays is one way in which groupware can benefit from accepting and working with the reality of distributed systems, rather than trying to maintain the illusion of copresent interaction.

© All rights reserved Gutwin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Fielding, Dan, Fraser, Mike, Logan, Brian and Benford, Steve (2004): Extending game participation with embodied reporting agents. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology June 3-5, 2004, Singapore. pp. 100-108.

2003
 
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Fraser, Mike, Stanton, Danae, Ng, K. H., Benford, Steve, Malley, C. O., Bowers, John, Taxen, G., Ferris, K. and Hindmarsh, Jon (2003): Assembling history: Achieving coherent experiences with diverse technologies. In: Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2003. pp. 179-198.

2002
 
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Schnadelbach, Holger, Koleva, Boriana, Flintham, Martin, Fraser, Mike, Izadi, Shahram, Chandler, Paul, Foster, Malcolm, Benford, Steve and Rodden, Tom (2002): The augurscope: a mixed reality interface for outdoors. In: Terveen, Loren (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2002 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 20-25, 2002, Minneapolis, Minnesota. pp. 9-16.

 
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Benford, Steve, Reynard, Gail, Koleva, Boriana, Greenhalgh, Chris and Fraser, Mike (2002): CSCP. In: Herczeg, Michael and Oberquelle, Horst (eds.) Mensch and Computer 2002 September 2-5, 2002, Hamburg, Germany. .

 
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Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike, Benford, Steve, Flintham, Martin, Greenhalgh, Chris, Rodden, Tom and Schndelbach, Holger (2002): Citywide: Supporting Interactive Digital Experiences Across Physical Space. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 6 (4) pp. 290-298.

2001
 
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Craven, Mike, Taylor, Ian, Drozd, Adam, Purbrick, Jim, Greenhalgh, Chris, Benford, Steve, Fraser, Mike, Bowers, John and Hoch, Michael (2001): Exploiting Interactivity, Influence, Space and Time to Explore Non-Linear Drama in Virtual Worlds. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 30-37.

We present four contrasting interfaces to allow multiple viewers to explore 3D recordings of dramas in on-line virtual worlds. The first is an on-line promenade performance to an audience of avatars. The second is a form of immersive cinema, with multiple simultaneous viewpoints. The third is a tabletop projection surface that allows viewers to select detailed views from a bird's-eye overview. The fourth is a linear television broadcast created by a director or editor. A comparison of these examples shows how a viewing audience can exploit four general resources - interactivity, influence, space, and time - to make sense of complex, non-linear virtual drama. These resources provide interaction designers with a general framework for defining the relationship between the audience and the 3D content.

© All rights reserved Craven et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Koleva, Boriana, Taylor, Ian, Benford, Steve, Fraser, Mike, Greenhalgh, Chris, Schnadelbach, Holger, Lehn, Dirk vom, Heath, Christian and Adams, Matt (2001): Orchestrating a Mixed Reality Performance. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 38-45.

A study of a professional touring mixed reality performance called Desert Rain yields insights into how performers orchestrate players' engagement in an interactive experience. Six players at a time journey through an extended physical and virtual set. Each sees a virtual world projected onto a screen made from a fine water spray. This acts as a traversable interface, supporting the illusion that performers physically pass between real and virtual worlds. Live and video-based observations of Desert Rain, coupled with interviews with players and the production team, have revealed how the performers create conditions for the willing suspension of disbelief, and how they monitor and intervene in the players experience without breaking their engagement. This involves carefully timed performances and "off-face" and "virtual" interventions. In turn, these are supported by the ability to monitor players' physical and virtual activity through asymmetric interfaces.

© All rights reserved Koleva et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Fraser, Mike (2001): Book review: "Social Navigation of Information Space" by Alan J. Munro, Kristina Hook and David Benyon (eds.). In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 10 (1) pp. 139-141.

 
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Drozd, Adam, Bowers, John, Benford, Steve, Greenhalgh, Chris and Fraser, Mike (2001): Collaboratively improvising magic: An approach to managing participation in an on-line drama. In: Ecscw 2001 - Proceedings of the Seventh European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work 16-20 September, 2001, Bonn, Germany. pp. 159-178.

 
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Benford, Steve, Bowers, John, Chandler, Paul, Ciolfi, Luigina, Flintham, Martin, Fraser, Mike, Greenhalgh, Chris, Hall, Tony, Hellstrom, Sten-Olof, Izadi, Shahram, Rodden, Tom, Schndelbach, Holger and Taylor, Ian (2001): Unearthing Virtual History: Using Diverse Interfaces to Reveal Hidden Virtual Worlds. In: Abowd, Gregory D., Brumitt, Barry and Shafer, Steven A. (eds.) Ubicomp 2001 Ubiquitous Computing - Third International Conference September 30 - October 2, 2001, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 225-231.

2000
 
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Hindmarsh, Jon, Fraser, Mike, Heath, Christian, Benford, Steve and Greenhalgh, Chris (2000): Object-Focused Interaction in Collaborative Virtual Environments. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 7 (4) pp. 477-509.

This paper explores and evaluates the support for object-focused interaction provided by a desktop Collaborative Virtual Environment. An experimental "design" task was conducted, and video recordings of the participants' activities facilitated an observational analysis of interaction in, and through, the virtual world. Observations include: problems due to "fragmented" views of embodiments in relation to shared objects; participants compensating with spoken accounts of their actions; and difficulties in understanding others' perspectives. Implications and proposals for the design of CVEs drawn from these observations are: the use of semidistorted views to support peripheral awareness; more explicit or exaggerated representations of actions than are provided by pseudohumanoid avatars; and navigation techniques that are sensitive to the actions of others. The paper also presents some examples of the ways in which these proposals might be realized.

© All rights reserved Hindmarsh et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Fraser, Mike, Benford, Steve, Hindmarsh, Jon and Heath, Christian (1999): Supporting Awareness and Interaction through Collaborative Virtual Interfaces. In: Zanden, Brad Vander and Marks, Joe (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 07 - 10, 1999, Asheville, North Carolina, United States. pp. 27-36.

This paper explores interfaces to virtual environments supporting multiple users. An interface to an environment allowing interaction with virtual artefacts is constructed, drawing on previous proposals for 'desktop' virtual environments. These include the use of Peripheral Lenses to support peripheral awareness in collaboration; and extending the ways in which users' actions are represented for each other. Through a qualitative analysis of a design task, the effect of the proposals is outlined. Observations indicate that, whilst these designs go some way to re-constructing physical co-presence in terms of awareness and interaction through the environment, some issues remain. Notably, peripheral distortion in supporting awareness may cause problematic interactions with and through the virtual world; and extended representations of actions may still allow problems in re-assembling the composition of others' actions. We discuss the potential for: designing representations for distorted peripheral perception; and explicitly displaying the course of action in object-focused interaction.

© All rights reserved Fraser et al. and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Hindmarsh, Jon, Fraser, Mike, Heath, Christian, Benford, Steve and Greenhalgh, Chris (1998): Fragmented Interaction: Establishing Mutual Orientation in Virtual Environments. In: Poltrock, Steven and Grudin, Jonathan (eds.) Proceedings of the 1998 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 14 - 18, 1998, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 217-226.

This paper explores and evaluates the support for object-focused collaboration provided by a desktop Collaborative Virtual Environment. The system was used to support an experimental 'design' task. Video recordings of the participants' activities facilitated an observational analysis of interaction in, and through, the virtual world. Observations include: problems due to fragmented views of embodiments in relation to shared objects; participants compensating with spoken accounts of their actions; and difficulties in understanding others' perspectives. Design implications include: more explicit representations of actions than are provided by pseudo-humanoid embodiments; and navigation techniques that are sensitive to the actions of others.

© All rights reserved Hindmarsh et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/mike_fraser.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1998-2012
Pub. count:30
Number of co-authors:68



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Steve Benford:17
Chris Greenhalgh:10
Jon Hindmarsh:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mike Fraser's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Benford:121
Carl Gutwin:116
Tom Rodden:106
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 3
72% booked. Starts in 23 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading