Publication statistics

Pub. period:2001-2012
Pub. count:31
Number of co-authors:39



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Jesper Kjeldskov:13
Jan Stage:6
Steve Howard:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mikael B. Skov's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jesper Kjeldskov:63
Steve Howard:57
Frank Vetere:42
 
 
 
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Mikael B. Skov

Ph.D

Picture of Mikael B. Skov.
Has also published under the name of:
"Michael B. Skov"

Personal Homepage:
http://people.cs.aau.dk/~dubois/

Current place of employment:
Aalborg University

Mikael B. Skov is an associate professor in human-computer interaction at the Centre for Socio-Interactive Design, at the Department of Computer Science, Aalborg University. He teach computer science, software engineering, informatics programs. Additionally, he teach at interdisciplinary bachelor of IT program. Primarily he does research within pervasive and mobile computing, social computing, interaction design for children, and usability engineering. Also, Mikael B.Skov is serving as an associate editor for IJCCI and meta-reviewer for IJMHCI. Also, he is serving as an associate chair for the CHI 2012, CHI 2013, IDC 2013, NordiCHI 2012 and as a PC member for IDC 2012, AUI 2012, and Interact 2013.

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Publications by Mikael B. Skov (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper and Skov, Mikael B. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2012 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2012, Austin, Texas.

 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper, Skov, Mikael B., Paay, Jeni and Pathmanathan, Rahuvaran (2012): Using Mobile Phones to Support Sustainability: A Field Study of Residential Electricity Consumption. In: Kjeldskov, Jesper and Skov, Mikael B. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2012 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2012, Austin, Texas. pp. 2347-2356.

Recent focus on sustainability has made consumers more aware of our joint responsibility for conserving energy resources such as electricity. However, reducing electricity use can be difficult with only a meter and a monthly or annual electricity bill. With the emergence of new power meters units, information on electricity consumption is now available digitally and wirelessly. This enables the design and deployment of a new class of persuasive systems giving consumers insight into their use of energy resources and means for reducing it. In this paper, we explore the design and use of one such system, Power Advisor, promoting electricity conservation through tailored information on a mobile phone or tablet. The use of the system in 10 households was studied over 7 weeks. Findings provide insight into peoples awareness of electricity consumption in their home and how this may be influenced through design.

© All rights reserved Kjeldskov et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Skov, Mikael B., Kjeldskov, Jesper, Paay, Jeni, Husted, Niels, Nørskov, Jacob and Pedersen, Kenneth (2012): Designing on-site: Facilitating Participatory Contextual Architecture with Mobile Phones. In Journal of Pervasive and Mobile Computing, 8 (6) .

Some movements within modern architecture particularly emphasise the importance of matching buildings to their surroundings. However, practicing such “contextual architecture” is highly challenging and typically not something the future inhabitants of a building are well equipped for participating in. This paper explores the potentials of using mobile phone technology for facilitating such client participation in the parts of an architecture process that take place on the building site. For this we introduce ArchiLens, a mobile system for interactive on-site 3D visualisation of houses, and findings from a field study with 40 participants in the process of building or modifying their home. The study showed that using the system helped evoke people's imagination of the look and feel of their future house, and envision it in context. This enabled them to participate more closely in the design process on-site by iteratively reviewing design alternatives and exploring, for example, other placements and materials.

© All rights reserved Skov et al. and/or Elsevier

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
2010
 
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Jensen, Brit Susan, Skov, Mikael B. and Thiruravichandran, Nissan (2010): Studying driver attention and behaviour for three configurations of GPS navigation in real traffic driving. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1271-1280.

Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation systems were amongst the top selling consumer technologies in 2008 and research has indicated that such technologies could affect driving behaviour. In this paper, we study how different output configurations (audio, visual and audio-visual) of a GPS system affect driving behaviour and performance. We conducted field experiments in real traffic with 30 subjects. Our results illustrated that visual output not only causes a substantial amount of eye glances, but also led to a decrease in driving performance. Adding audio output decreased the number of eye glances, but we found no significant effects on driving performance. Although the audio configuration implied much fewer eye glances and improved driving performance, several participants expressed preference for the audio/visual output.

© All rights reserved Jensen et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Bach, Kenneth Majlund, Jæger, Mads Gregers, Skov, Mikael B. and Thomassen, Nils Gram (2009): Interacting with in-vehicle systems: understanding, measuring, and evaluating attention. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 453-462.

In-vehicle systems research is becoming a significant field as the market for in-vehicle systems continue to grow. As a consequence, researchers are increasingly concerned with opportunities and limitations of HCI in a moving vehicle. Especially aspects of attention constitute a challenge for in-vehicle systems development. This paper seeks to remedy this by defining and exemplifying attention understandings. 100 papers were classified in a two-fold perspective; under what settings are in-vehicle systems evaluated and how is driver attention measured in regard to in-vehicle systems HCI. A breakdown of the distribution of driving settings and measures is presented and the impact of driver attention is discussed. The classification revealed that most of the studies were conducted in driving simulators and real traffic driving, while lateral and longitudinal control and eye behaviour were the most used measures.

© All rights reserved Bach et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Black, Darren, Clemmensen, Nils Jakob and Skov, Mikael B. (2009): Supporting the supermarket shopping experience through a context-aware shopping trolley. In: Proceedings of OZCHI09, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009. pp. 33-40.

Shopping in supermarkets is becoming an increasingly interactive experience as stores integrate technologies to support shoppers. While shopping is an essential and routine type of consumer behaviour, emerging technologies posses the qualities to change our behaviour and patterns while shopping. This paper describes CAST -- a context-aware shopping trolley designed to support the shopping activity in a supermarket through context-awareness and the acquiring of user attention. The design is based on understandings of supermarket shopping needs and behaviour derived from previous studies. The system supports customers in finding and purchasing products from a shopping list. A field evaluation showed that CAST affected the shopping behaviour and experience in more ways, e.g. more uniform behaviour in terms of product sequence collection, ease of finding products. However, they saved no significant time of the shopping activity.

© All rights reserved Black et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Bach, Kenneth Majlund, Jæger, Mads Gregers, Skov, Mikael B. and Thomassen, Nils Gram (2008): You can touch, but you can't look: interacting with in-vehicle systems. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1139-1148.

Car drivers are nowadays offered a wide array of in-vehicle systems i.e. route guidance systems, climate controls, music players. Such in-vehicle systems often require the driver's visual attention, but visual workload has shown significant less eyes-on-the-road time and affects driving performance. In this paper, we illustrate and compare three different interaction techniques for in-vehicle systems. We refer to them as tactile, touch, and gesture interaction. The focus of the techniques is the effects on drivers while driving cars. We evaluated the interaction techniques with 16 subjects in two settings. Our results showed that gesture interaction has a significant effect on the number of driver eye glances especially eye fixations of more seconds. However, gesture interaction still required rapid eye glances for hand/eye coordination. On the other hand, touch interaction leads to fast and efficient task completion while tactile interaction seemed inferior to the two other interaction techniques.

© All rights reserved Bach et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bach, Kenneth M., Jæger, Mads G., Skov, Mikael B. and Thomassen, Nils G. (2008): Evaluating Driver Attention and Driving Behaviour: Comparing Controlled Driving and Simulated Driving. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 193-201.

Emerging in-vehicle systems have turned the contemporary car into a human-computer interaction context that has its own set of rules and challenges. Interacting with in-vehicle systems while driving a car can greatly affect the driving performance and have been shown to be the cause of many road accidents. Evaluation of in-vehicle systems is a subject of much interest to developers and researchers. One of the major issues is how to evaluate; is there added value in taking your evaluation on the road or is simulated driving sufficient? This paper examines differences and similarities between taking in-vehicle systems to a track or to the laboratory by investigating the results (and costs associated) from two driving settings for in-vehicle systems evaluation; one on a test track and one using a lightweight driving simulator. Our results show that the two settings do seem to lead to a number of similar results. However, our results indicated that controlled driving yield more frequent and longer eye glances compared to simulated driving and driving errors were more common in simulated driving.

© All rights reserved Bach et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Høegh, Rune T., Kjeldskov, Jesper, Skov, Mikael B. and Stage, Jan (2008): A Field Laboratory for Evaluating In Situ. In: Klinger, Kristin, Roth, Kristin, Neidig, Jennifer, Reed, Sara, Langel, Joy, Smalley, Katie and Thor, Angela (eds.). "Handbook of Research on User Interface Design and Evaluation for Mobile Technology". IGI Globalpp. 982-996

Evaluating mobile technologies “in the real world” is hard. It is challenging to capture key situations of use, hard to apply established techniques such as observation and “thinking aloud,” and it is complicated to collect data of an acceptable quality. In response to these challenges, a “field laboratory” has been developed for evaluating mobile technologies in situ. Facilitating high-quality data collection as well as unobstructed user interaction, the field laboratory allows a small wireless camera to be attached to a mobile device, capturing a close-up image of the screen and buttons. This chapter describes the iterative development of the field laboratory over 4 years of evaluating several mobile systems in field settings. It leads to a description of the current setup and how it is used, and explains the rationales for key decisions on technology and form factors made throughout its development.

© All rights reserved Høegh et al. and/or IGI Global

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
2007
 
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Bekker, Tilde, Robertson, Judy and Skov, Mikael B. (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children June 6-8, 2007, Aalborg, Denmark.

 
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Bekker, Tilde, Robertson, Judy and Skov, Mikael B. (eds.) 6th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children June 6-8, 2007, Aalborg, Denmark.

 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper and Skov, Mikael B. (2007): Studying Usability In Sitro: Simulating Real World Phenomena in Controlled Environments. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 7-36.

Increased complexity of organizations and emerging technologies poses new and difficult challenges for the evaluation of software systems. Several years of research have proven that usability evaluations are invaluable tools for ensuring the quality of software technologies, but the increased complexity of technology requires new ways of understanding and evaluating the quality of software systems. This article explores limitations, challenges, and opportunities for studying mobile technologies "in use, in situ;" in laboratories (in vitro); and in controlled high-fidelity simulations of the real world. The latter condition is called "in sitro". This report comes from 2 different case studies of evaluating the usability of mobile systems within these 3 different conditions. Results show that it is possible to recreate and simulate significant elements of intended future use situations in laboratory settings and thereby increase the level of realism and maintain a high level of control. In fact, the in sitro condition was able to identify most of the same usability problems as found in the other conditions. However, the in situ evaluation proved to provide a level of realism that is difficult to achieve in laboratory environments.

© All rights reserved Kjeldskov and Skov and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Davis, Hilary, Skov, Mikael B., Stougaard, Malthe and Vetere, Frank (2007): Virtual box: supporting mediated family intimacy through virtual and physical play. In: Proceedings of OZCHI07, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 28-30, 2007, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 151-159.

Mediated intimacy is the phenomenon where humans use technologies to express, share, or communicate intimate feelings with each other. Typically, technologies supporting mediated intimacy encompass different characteristics than technologies designed to solve specific work-oriented tasks. This paper reports on the design, implementation and initial evaluation of Virtual Box. Virtual Box attempts to create a physical and engaging context in order to support reciprocal interactions with expressive content. An implemented version of Virtual Box is evaluated in a location-aware environment to evaluate the design ideas according to mediated family intimacy.

© All rights reserved Davis et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Garnæs, Kasper, Grünberger, Olga, Kjeldskov, Jesper and Skov, Mikael B. (2007): Designing technologies for presence-in-absence: illustrating the Cube and the Picture Frame. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 11 (5) pp. 403-408.

 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper and Skov, Mikael B. (2007): Exploring context-awareness for ubiquitous computing in the healthcare domain. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 11 (7) pp. 549-562.

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Howard, Steve, Kjeldskov, Jesper and Skov, Mikael B. (2007): Pervasive computing in the domestic space. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 11 (5) pp. 329-333.

2006
 
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Howard, Steve, Kjeldskov, Jesper, Skov, Mikael B., Garnaes, Kasper and Grunberger, Olga (2006): Negotiating presence-in-absence: contact, content and context. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 909-912.

On the basis of a longitudinal field study of domestic communication, we report some essential constituents of the user experience of awareness of others who are distant in space or time, i.e. presence-in-absence. We discuss presence-in-absence in terms of its social (Contact) and informational (Content) facets, and the circumstances of the experience (Context). The field evaluation of a prototype, 'The Cube', designed to support presence-in-absence, threw up issues in the interrelationships between contact, content and context; issues that the designers of similar social artifacts will need to address.

© All rights reserved Howard et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Dalsgaard, Thomas, Skov, Mikael B., Stougaard, Malthe and Thomassen, Bo (2006): Mediated intimacy in families: understanding the relation between children and parents. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC06: Interaction Design and Children 2006. pp. 145-152.

Mediating intimacy between children and their parents is still limited investigated and at the same time, we find that, emerging technologies are about to change and affect the way we interact with each other. In this paper, we report from an empirical study where we investigated the social interaction phenomena that unfold between children and their parents. We used cultural probes and contextual interviews to investigate the intimate acts between children and parents in three families. Our findings show that the intimate act between children and parents share a number of similarities with other types of intimate relations such as strong-tie intimacy (couples cohabiting). However, we also identified several issues of intimacy unique to the special relation between children and their parents. These unique acts of intimacy propose challenges when designing technologies for mediated intimacy in families.

© All rights reserved Dalsgaard et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Andersen, Berith L., Jørgensen, Martin L., Kold, Ulrik and Skov, Mikael B. (2006): iSocialize: investigating awareness cues for a mobile social awareness application. In: Kjeldskov, Jesper and Paay, Jane (eds.) Proceedings of OZCHI06, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2006. pp. 7-14.

Emerging technologies increasingly provide opportunities for creating and maintaining social relations with people even though separated by time or distance. However, it is still unclear how such technologies can support these social relations and what kind of interface awareness cues such technologies should provide. Based on an ethnographic study of social awareness in families, we identified four awareness cues namely activity, status, relation, and vicinity. From these cues, we designed a prototype called iSocialize to explore the identified awareness cues. Based on a laboratory-based evaluation, we assessed our solution and identified five issues of social awareness cues including that imprecise awareness cues are requested to ensure privacy issues and that users found it difficult to maintain a continuously peripheral awareness of their contacts.

© All rights reserved Andersen et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Skov, Mikael B. and Høegh, Rune Thaarup (2006): Supporting information access in a hospital ward by a context-aware mobile electronic patient record. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 10 (4) pp. 205-214.

2005
 
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Als, Benedikte S., Jensen, Janne J. and Skov, Mikael B. (2005): Comparison of think-aloud and constructive interaction in usability testing with children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC05: Interaction Design and Children 2005. pp. 9-16.

Constructive interaction provides natural thinking-aloud as test subjects collaborate to solve tasks. Since children may face difficulties in following instructions for a standard think-aloud test, constructive interaction has been suggested as evaluation method when conducting usability testing with children. However, the relationship between think-aloud and constructive interaction is still poorly understood. We present an experiment that compares think-aloud and constructive interaction in usability testing. The experiment involves 60 children with three setups where children apply think-aloud, and constructive interaction in acquainted and non-acquainted pairs. Our results showed only minor significant differences between the setups, but the pairing of the children had impact on identification of usability problems as acquainted dyads identified more problems both in total and of the most severe than non-acquainted dyads and individual testers. Finally, the acquainted pairs reported that they had to put less effort into the testing than the think-aloud and non-acquainted children.

© All rights reserved Als et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jensen, Janne J. and Skov, Mikael B. (2005): A review of research methods in children's technology design. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC05: Interaction Design and Children 2005. pp. 80-87.

Research methods have been objects of discussions for decades and defining research methods is still a quite considerable challenge. However, it is important to understand research methods in different disciplines as it informs us on future directions and influences on the discipline. We conduct a survey of research methods in paper publications. 105 papers on children's technology design are classified on a two-dimensional matrix on research method and purpose. Our results show a strong focus on engineering of products as applied research and on evaluation of developed products in the field or in the lab. Also, we find that much research is conducted in natural setting environments with strong focus on field studies.

© All rights reserved Jensen and Skov and/or ACM Press

 
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Als, B. S., Jensen, J. J. and Skov, Mikael B. (2005): Exploring Verbalization and Collaboration of Constructive Interaction with Children. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT05: Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 443-456.

Constructive interaction provides natural thinking-aloud as test subjects collaborate in pairs to solve tasks. Since children may face difficulties in following instructions for a standard think-aloud test, constructive interaction has been suggested as evaluation method when usability testing with children. However, the relationship between think-aloud and constructive interaction is still poorly understood. We present an experiment that compares think-aloud and constructive interaction. The experiment involves 60 children with three setups where children apply think-aloud or constructive interaction in acquainted and non-acquainted pairs. Our results show that the pairing of children had impact on how the children collaborated in pairs and how they would afterward assess the testing sessions. In some cases, we found that acquainted dyads would perform well as they would more naturally interact and collaborate while in other cases they would have problems in controlling the evaluations.

© All rights reserved Als et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Skov, Mikael B. and Stage, Jan (2005): Supporting problem identification in usability evaluations. In: Proceedings of OZCHI05, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 1-9.

Identification of usability problems is a key element in a usability evaluation of an interactive system. This paper presents and discusses results from an empirical study of problem identification. The study includes an experiment, where it was examined to what extent a conceptual tool can support problem identification in a usability evaluation. A group of novice evaluators was divided into two, and one of the groups received a conceptual tool and a related presentation of ideas and examples. Both groups conducted a usability evaluation based on the same recording of a user applying a web-based system to solve a series of tasks. It is concluded that the conceptual tool and training in using the tool improve the problem identification performance of a group of inexperienced usability evaluators.

© All rights reserved Skov and Stage and/or their publisher

 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper, Skov, Mikael B. and Stage, Jan (2005): Does time heal?: a longitudinal study of usability. In: Proceedings of OZCHI05, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 1-10.

We report from a longitudinal laboratory-based usability evaluation of an interactive system. A usability evaluation was conducted with novice users when a large commercial electronic patient record system was being deployed in the use organization. After the users had used the system in their daily work for 15 months, same evaluation was conducted again. Our aim was to inquire into the nature of usability problems experienced by novice and expert users over time, and to see to what extends usability problems may or may not disappear over time, as users get more familiar with the system. On the basis of our two usability evaluations, we present key findings on the usability of the evaluated system as experienced by the two categories of users at these two different points in time. Based on our findings, we discuss implications for evaluating usability.

© All rights reserved Kjeldskov et al. and/or their publisher

2004
 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper, Skov, Mikael B. and Stage, Jan (2004): Instant data analysis: conducting usability evaluations in a day. In: Proceedings of the Third Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction October 23-27, 2004, Tampere, Finland. pp. 233-240.

When designing a usability evaluation, key decisions must be made regarding methods and techniques for data collection and analysis. Although there is a strong body of research within human-computer interaction regarding the appropriate choices of data collection methods and techniques much less research has been conducted examining and comparing methods and techniques for analyzing the collected data. This paper presents a data analysis technique which allows usability evaluations to be conducted, analyzed and documented in a day; Instant Data Analysis (IDA). The use of this technique is exemplified through a usability evaluation of a software product for a large hospital for which traditional video data analysis and Instant Data Analysis were applied independently through a controlled experiment. Among our key findings, the experiment revealed that in only 10% of the time required to do the video data analysis, Instant Data Analysis identified 85% of the critical usability problems in the system being evaluated. At the same time, the noise of unique usability problems usually characterizing video data analysis was significantly reduced.

© All rights reserved Kjeldskov et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper, Skov, Mikael B., Als, Benedikte S. and Høegh, Rune Thaarup (2004): Is It Worth the Hassle? Exploring the Added Value of Evaluating the Usability of Context-Aware Mobile Systems in the Field. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 61-73.

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Po, Shirlina, Howard, Steve, Vetere, Frank and Skov, Mikael B. (2004): Heuristic Evaluation and Mobile Usability: Bridging the Realism Gap. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 49-60.

 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper and Skov, Mikael B. (2004): Supporting Work Activities in Healthcare by Mobile Electronic Patient Records. In: Masoodian, Masood, Jones, Steve and Rogers, Bill (eds.) Computer Human Interaction 6th Asia Pacific Conference - APCHI 2004 June 29 - July 2, 2004, Rotorua, New Zealand. pp. 191-200.

2002
 
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Skov, Mikael B. and Stage, Jan (2002): Designing interactive narrative systems: is object-orientation useful?. In Computers & Graphics, 26 (1) pp. 57-66.

2001
 
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Skov, Mikael B. and Stage, Jan (2001): A simple approach to web-site usability testing. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) HCI International 2001 - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 5-10, 2001, New Orleans, USA. pp. 737-741.

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/mikael_b__skov.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2001-2012
Pub. count:31
Number of co-authors:39



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Jesper Kjeldskov:13
Jan Stage:6
Steve Howard:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mikael B. Skov's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jesper Kjeldskov:63
Steve Howard:57
Frank Vetere:42
 
 
 
Jul 23

Men have become the tools of their tools.

-- Henry David Thoreau

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!