Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2012
Pub. count:38
Number of co-authors:52



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Terry Winograd:6
Clifton Forlines:5
Andrew D. Wilson:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Meredith Ringel Morris's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ravin Balakrishnan:108
Jacob O. Wobbrock:71
Eric Horvitz:70
 
 
 
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Meredith Ringel Morris

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Publications by Meredith Ringel Morris (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Counts, Scott, Roseway, Asta, Hoff, Aaron and Schwarz, Julia (2012): Tweeting is believing?: understanding microblog credibility perceptions. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 441-450.

Twitter is now used to distribute substantive content such as breaking news, increasing the importance of assessing the credibility of tweets. As users increasingly access tweets through search, they have less information on which to base credibility judgments as compared to consuming content from direct social network connections. We present survey results regarding users' perceptions of tweet credibility. We find a disparity between features users consider relevant to credibility assessment and those currently revealed by search engines. We then conducted two experiments in which we systematically manipulated several features of tweets to assess their impact on credibility ratings. We show that users are poor judges of truthfulness based on content alone, and instead are influenced by heuristics such as user name when making credibility assessments. Based on these findings, we discuss strategies tweet authors can use to enhance their credibility with readers (and strategies astute readers should be aware of!). We propose design improvements for displaying social search results so as to better convey credibility.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Bragdon, Andrew, DeLine, Rob, Hinckley, Ken and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2011): Code space: touch + air gesture hybrid interactions for supporting developer meetings. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 212-221.

We present Code Space, a system that contributes touch + air gesture hybrid interactions to support co-located, small group developer meetings by democratizing access, control, and sharing of information across multiple personal devices and public displays. Our system uses a combination of a shared multi-touch screen, mobile touch devices, and Microsoft Kinect sensors. We describe cross-device interactions, which use a combination of in-air pointing for social disclosure of commands, targeting and mode setting, combined with touch for command execution and precise gestures. In a formative study, professional developers were positive about the interaction design, and most felt that pointing with hands or devices and forming hand postures are socially acceptable. Users also felt that the techniques adequately disclosed who was interacting and that existing social protocols would help to dictate most permissions, but also felt that our lightweight permission feature helped presenters manage incoming content.

© All rights reserved Bragdon et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kane, Shaun K., Morris, Meredith Ringel, Perkins, Annuska Z., Wigdor, Daniel, Ladner, Richard E. and Wobbrock, Jacob O. (2011): Access overlays: improving non-visual access to large touch screens for blind users. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 273-282.

Many touch screens remain inaccessible to blind users, and those approaches to providing access that do exist offer minimal support for interacting with large touch screens or spatial data. In this paper, we introduce a set of three software-based access overlays intended to improve the accessibility of large touch screen interfaces, specifically interactive tabletops. Our access overlays are called edge projection, neighborhood browsing, and touch-and-speak. In a user study, 14 blind users compared access overlays to an implementation of Apple's VoiceOver screen reader. Our results show that two of our techniques were faster than VoiceOver, that participants correctly answered more questions about the screen's layout using our techniques, and that participants overwhelmingly preferred our techniques. We developed several applications demonstrating the use of access overlays, including an accessible map kiosk and an accessible board game.

© All rights reserved Kane et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Paul, Sharoda A. and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2011): Sensemaking in Collaborative Web Search. In Human Computer Interaction, 26 (1) pp. 72-122.

Sensemaking is an important aspect of information-seeking tasks but has mostly been studied at the individual level. We conducted a study of sensemaking in collaborative Web search using SearchTogether and found that collaborators face several challenges in making sense of information during collaborative search tasks. We built and evaluated a new tool, CoSense, which enhanced sensemaking in SearchTogether. The evaluation of CoSense provided insights into how collaborative sensemaking differed from individual sensemaking in terms of the different kinds of information that collaborators needed to make sense of. In this article we discuss findings about how sensemaking occurs in synchronous and asynchronous collaboration and the challenges participants face in handling handoffs. We found that participants had two different strategies of handling handoffs -- search-lead and sensemaking-lead -- and that participants with these two strategies exhibited different procedural knowledge of sensemaking. We also discuss how complex and varied the products of sensemaking are during a collaborative search task. Through our evaluation of CoSense we provide insights into the design of tools that can enhance sensemaking in collaborative search tasks.

© All rights reserved Paul and Morris and/or Lawrence Erlbaum

2010
 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Teevan, Jaime and Panovich, Katrina (2010): What do people ask their social networks, and why?: a survey study of status message q&a behavior. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1739-1748.

People often turn to their friends, families, and colleagues when they have questions. The recent, rapid rise of online social networking tools has made doing this on a large scale easy and efficient. In this paper we explore the phenomenon of using social network status messages to ask questions. We conducted a survey of 624 people, asking them to share the questions they have asked and answered of their online social networks. We present detailed data on the frequency of this type of question asking, the types of questions asked, and respondents' motivations for asking their social networks rather than using more traditional search tools like Web search engines. We report on the perceived speed and quality of the answers received, as well as what motivates people to respond to questions seen in their friends' status messages. We then discuss the implications of our findings for the design of next-generation search tools.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Amershi, Saleema, Morris, Meredith Ringel, Moraveji, Neema, Balakrishnan, Ravin and Toyama, Kentaro (2010): Multiple mouse text entry for single-display groupware. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 169-178.

A recent trend in interface design for classrooms in developing regions has many students interacting on the same display using mice. Text entry has emerged as an important problem preventing such mouse-based single-display groupware systems from offering compelling interactive activities. We explore the design space of mouse-based text entry and develop 13 techniques with novel characteristics suited to the multiple mouse scenario. We evaluated these in a 3-phase study over 14 days with 40 students in 2 developing region schools. The results show that one technique effectively balanced all of our design dimensions, another was most preferred by students, and both could benefit from augmentation to support collaborative interaction. Our results also provide insights into the factors that create an optimal text entry technique for single-display groupware systems.

© All rights reserved Amershi et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Lombardo, Jarrod and Wigdor, Daniel (2010): WeSearch: supporting collaborative search and sensemaking on a tabletop display. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 401-410.

Groups of users often have shared information needs -- for example, business colleagues need to conduct research relating to joint projects and students must work together on group homework assignments. In this paper, we introduce WeSearch, a collaborative Web search system designed to leverage the benefits of tabletop displays for face-to-face collaboration and organization tasks. We describe the design of WeSearch and explain the interactions it affords. We then describe an evaluation in which eleven groups used WeSearch to conduct real collaborative search tasks. Based on our study's findings, we analyze the effectiveness of the features introduced by WeSearch.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hartmann, Björn, Morris, Meredith Ringel, Benko, Hrvoje and Wilson, Andrew D. (2010): Pictionaire: supporting collaborative design work by integrating physical and digital artifacts. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 421-424.

This paper introduces an interactive tabletop system that enhances creative collaboration across physical and digital artifacts. Pictionaire offers capture, retrieval, annotation, and collection of visual material. It enables multiple designers to fluidly move imagery from the physical to the digital realm; work with found, drawn and captured imagery; organize items into functional collections; and record meeting histories. These benefits are made possible by a large interactive table augmented with high-resolution overhead image capture. Summative evaluations with 16 professionals and four student pairs validated discoverability and utility of interactions, uncovered emergent functionality, and suggested opportunities for transitioning content to and from the table.

© All rights reserved Hartmann et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Wobbrock, Jacob O. and Wilson, Andrew D. (2010): Understanding users' preferences for surface gestures. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Conference on Graphics Interface 2010. pp. 261-268.

We compare two gesture sets for interactive surfaces -- a set of gestures created by an end-user elicitation method and a set of gestures authored by three HCI researchers. Twenty-two participants who were blind to the gestures' authorship evaluated 81 gestures presented and performed on a Microsoft Surface. Our findings indicate that participants preferred gestures authored by larger groups of people, such as those created by end-user elicitation methodologies or those proposed by more than one researcher. This preference pattern seems to arise in part because the HCI researchers proposed more physically and conceptually complex gestures than end-users. We discuss our findings in detail, including the implications for surface gesture design.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Buscher, Georg, Cutrell, Edward and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2009): What do you see when you're surfing?: using eye tracking to predict salient regions of web pages. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 21-30.

An understanding of how people allocate their visual attention when viewing Web pages is very important for Web authors, interface designers, advertisers and others. Such knowledge opens the door to a variety of innovations, ranging from improved Web page design to the creation of compact, yet recognizable, visual representations of long pages. We present an eye-tracking study in which 20 users viewed 361 Web pages while engaged in information foraging and page recognition tasks. From this data, we describe general location-based characteristics of visual attention for Web pages dependent on different tasks and demographics, and generate a model for predicting the visual attention that individual page elements may receive. Finally, we introduce the concept of fixation impact, a new method for mapping gaze data to visual scenes that is motivated by findings in vision research.

© All rights reserved Buscher et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Fiebrink, Rebecca, Morris, Dan and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2009): Dynamic mapping of physical controls for tabletop groupware. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 471-480.

Multi-touch interactions are a promising means of control for interactive tabletops. However, a lack of precision and tactile feedback makes multi-touch controls a poor fit for tasks where precision and feedback are crucial. We present an approach that offers precise control and tactile feedback for tabletop systems through the integration of dynamically re-mappable physical controllers with the multi-touch environment, and we demonstrate this approach in our collaborative tabletop audio editing environment. An observational user study demonstrates that our approach can provide needed precision and feedback, while preserving the collaborative benefits of a shared direct-manipulation surface. Our observations also suggest that direct touch and physical controllers can offer complementary benefits, and that providing both allows users to adjust their control strategy based on considerations including precision, convenience, visibility, and user role.

© All rights reserved Fiebrink et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wobbrock, Jacob O., Morris, Meredith Ringel and Wilson, Andrew D. (2009): User-defined gestures for surface computing. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1083-1092.

Many surface computing prototypes have employed gestures created by system designers. Although such gestures are appropriate for early investigations, they are not necessarily reflective of user behavior. We present an approach to designing tabletop gestures that relies on eliciting gestures from non-technical users by first portraying the effect of a gesture, and then asking users to perform its cause. In all, 1080 gestures from 20 participants were logged, analyzed, and paired with think-aloud data for 27 commands performed with 1 and 2 hands. Our findings indicate that users rarely care about the number of fingers they employ, that one hand is preferred to two, that desktop idioms strongly influence users' mental models, and that some commands elicit little gestural agreement, suggesting the need for on-screen widgets. We also present a complete user-defined gesture set, quantitative agreement scores, implications for surface technology, and a taxonomy of surface gestures. Our results will help designers create better gesture sets informed by user behavior.

© All rights reserved Wobbrock et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Paul, Sharoda A. and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2009): CoSense: enhancing sensemaking for collaborative web search. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1771-1780.

Making sense of the information found during an investigational Web search task can be daunting. With the recent emergence of tools to support collaborative Web search, the associated sensemaking task has become even more complex, requiring sense to be made not only of the products of a search (i.e., results found) but of the process, as well (i.e., group division of labor and decision-making). We present the findings of a formative study illustrating the sensemaking challenges posed by collaborative search tools. Based on these findings, we created CoSense, a system that supports sensemaking for collaborative Web search tasks by providing several rich, interactive views of a group's search activities. We describe an evaluation of CoSense, reflecting on how its features supported different aspects of sensemaking, and how future collaborative search systems can benefit from these findings.

© All rights reserved Paul and Morris and/or ACM Press

 
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Amershi, Saleema and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2009): Co-located collaborative web search: understanding status quo practices. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3637-3642.

Co-located collaborative Web search is a surprisingly common activity, despite the fact that Web browsers and search engines are not designed to support collaboration. We report the findings of two studies (a diary study and an observational study) that provide insights regarding the frequency of co-located collaborative searching, the strategies participants use, and the pros and cons of these strategies. We then articulate design implications for next-generation tools that could enhance the experience of co-located collaborative search.

© All rights reserved Amershi and Morris and/or ACM Press

 
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Freeman, Dustin, Benko, Hrvoje, Morris, Meredith Ringel and Wigdor, Daniel (2009): ShadowGuides: visualizations for in-situ learning of multi-touch and whole-hand gestures. In: Proceedings of the 2009 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2009. pp. 165-172.

We present ShadowGuides, a system for in-situ learning of multi-touch and whole-hand gestures on interactive surfaces. ShadowGuides provides on-demand assistance to the user by combining visualizations of the user's current hand posture as interpreted by the system (feedback) and available postures and completion paths necessary to finish the gesture (feedforward). Our experiment compared participants learning gestures with ShadowGuides to those learning with video-based instruction. We found that participants learning with ShadowGuides remembered more gestures and expressed significantly higher preference for the help system.

© All rights reserved Freeman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hartmann, Björn, Morris, Meredith Ringel, Benko, Hrvoje and Wilson, Andrew D. (2009): Augmenting interactive tables with mice & keyboards. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2009. pp. 149-152.

This note examines the role traditional input devices can play in surface computing. Mice and keyboards can enhance tabletop technologies since they support high fidelity input, facilitate interaction with distant objects, and serve as a proxy for user identity and position. Interactive tabletops, in turn, can enhance the functionality of traditional input devices: they provide spatial sensing, augment devices with co-located visual content, and support connections among a plurality of devices. We introduce eight interaction techniques for a table with mice and keyboards, and we discuss the design space of such interactions.

© All rights reserved Hartmann et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Morris, Dan, Morris, Meredith Ringel and Venolia, Gina (2008): SearchBar: a search-centric web history for task resumption and information re-finding. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1207-1216.

Current user interfaces for Web search, including browsers and search engine sites, typically treat search as a transient activity. However, people often conduct complex, multi-query investigations that may span long durations and may be interrupted by other tasks. In this paper, we first present the results of a survey of users' search habits, which show that many search tasks span long periods of time. We then introduce SearchBar, a system for proactively and persistently storing query histories, browsing histories, and users' notes and ratings in an interrelated fashion. SearchBar supports multi-session investigations by assisting with task context resumption and information re-finding. We describe a user study comparing use of SearchBar to status-quo tools such as browser histories, and discuss our findings, which show that users find SearchBar valuable for task reacquisition. Our study also reveals the strategies employed by users of status-quo tools for handling multi-query, multi-session search tasks.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Amershi, Saleema and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2008): CoSearch: a system for co-located collaborative web search. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1647-1656.

Web search is often viewed as a solitary task; however, there are many situations in which groups of people gather around a single computer to jointly search for information online. We present the findings of interviews with teachers, librarians, and developing world researchers that provide details about users' collaborative search habits in shared-computer settings, revealing several limitations of this practice. We then introduce CoSearch, a system we developed to improve the experience of co-located collaborative Web search by leveraging readily available devices such as mobile phones and extra mice. Finally, we present an evaluation comparing CoSearch to status quo collaboration approaches, and show that CoSearch enabled distributed control and division of labor, thus reducing the frustrations associated with shared-computer searches, while still preserving the positive aspects of communication and collaboration associated with joint computer use.

© All rights reserved Amershi and Morris and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel (2008): A survey of collaborative web search practices. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1657-1660.

Today's Web browsers provide limited support for rich information-seeking and information-sharing scenarios. A survey we conducted of 204 knowledge workers at a large technology company has revealed that a large proportion of users engage in searches that include collaborative activities. We present the results of the survey, and then review the implications of these findings for designing new Web search interfaces that provide tools for sharing.

© All rights reserved Morris and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Teevan, Jaime and Bush, Steve (2008): Enhancing collaborative web search with personalization: groupization, smart splitting, and group hit-highlighting. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 481-484.

Collaboration on Web search is common in many domains, such as education and knowledge work; recently, HCI researchers have begun to introduce prototype collaborative search tools to support such scenarios. We analyze data from a collaborative search experiment, and based on these data we propose three techniques that can enhance the value of collaborative search tools using personalization: groupization, smart splitting, and group hit-highlighting.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pickens, Jeremy, Golovchinsky, Gene and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2008): Collaborative information retrieval. In: JCDL08 Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2008. p. 440.

The goal of the workshop is to bring together researchers interested in various aspects of small-team collaborative search to share ideas, to stimulate research in the area, and to increase the visibility of this emerging area. We expect to identify promising directions for further exploration and to establish collaborative links among research groups.

© All rights reserved Pickens et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Meyers, Brian (2008): A field study of knowledge workers' use of interactive horizontal displays. In: Third IEEE International Workshop on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Tabletop 2008 October 1-3, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 105-112.

 
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Everitt, Katherine, Morris, Meredith Ringel, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Wilson, Andrew D. (2008): DocuDesk: An interactive surface for creating and rehydrating many-to-many linkages among paper and digital documents. In: Third IEEE International Workshop on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Tabletop 2008 October 1-3, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 25-28.

2007
 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel and Horvitz, Eric (2007): SearchTogether: an interface for collaborative web search. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 7-10, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 3-12.

Studies of search habits reveal that people engage in many search tasks involving collaboration with others, such as travel planning, organizing social events, or working on a homework assignment. However, current Web search tools are designed for a single user, working alone. We introduce SearchTogether, a prototype that enables groups of remote users to synchronously or asynchronously collaborate when searching the Web. We describe an example usage scenario, and discuss the ways SearchTogether facilitates collaboration by supporting awareness, division of labor, and persistence. We then discuss the findings of our evaluation of SearchTogether, analyzing which aspects of its design enabled successful collaboration among study participants.

© All rights reserved Morris and Horvitz and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Meyers, Brian (2007): Reading Revisited: Evaluating the Usability of Digital Display Surfaces for Active Reading Tasks. In: Second IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2007 October 10-12, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 79-86.

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel and Horvitz, Eric (2007): S3: Storable, Shareable Search. In: Baranauskas, Maria Cecília Calani, Palanque, Philippe A., Abascal, Julio and Barbosa, Simone Diniz Junqueira (eds.) DEGAS 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services September 11th, 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. pp. 120-123.

2006
 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Huang, Anqi, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2006): Cooperative gestures: multi-user gestural interactions for co-located groupware. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 1201-1210.

Multi-user, touch-sensing input devices create opportunities for the use of cooperative gestures -- multi-user gestural interactions for single display groupware. Cooperative gestures are interactions where the system interprets the gestures of more than one user as contributing to a single, combined command. Cooperative gestures can be used to enhance users' sense of teamwork, increase awareness of important system events, facilitate reachability and access control on large, shared displays, or add a unique touch to an entertainment-oriented activity. This paper discusses motivating scenarios for the use of cooperative gesturing and describes some initial experiences with CollabDraw, a system for collaborative art and photo manipulation. We identify design issues relevant to cooperative gesturing interfaces, and present a preliminary design framework. We conclude by identifying directions for future research on cooperative gesturing interaction techniques.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Paepcke, Andreas, Winograd, Terry and Stamberger, Jeannie (2006): TeamTag: exploring centralized versus replicated controls for co-located tabletop groupware. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 1273-1282.

We explore how the placement of control widgets (such as menus) affects collaboration and usability for co-located tabletop groupware applications. We evaluated two design alternatives: a centralized set of controls shared by all users, and separate per-user controls replicated around the borders of the shared tabletop. We conducted this evaluation in the context of TeamTag, a system for collective annotation of digital photos. Our comparison of the two design alternatives found that users preferred replicated over shared controls. We discuss the cause of this preference, and also present data on the impact of these interface design variants on collaboration, as well as the role that orientation, co-touching, and the use of different regions of the table played in shaping users' behavior and preferences.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Piper, Anne Marie, O'Brien, Eileen, Morris, Meredith Ringel and Winograd, Terry (2006): SIDES: a cooperative tabletop computer game for social skills development. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 1-10.

This paper presents a design case study of SIDES: Shared Interfaces to Develop Effective Social Skills. SIDES is a tool designed to help adolescents with Asperger's Syndrome practice effective group work skills using a four-player cooperative computer game that runs on tabletop technology. We present the design process and evaluation of SIDES conducted over six months with a middle school social group therapy class. Our findings indicate that cooperative tabletop computer games are a motivating and supportive tool for facilitating effective group work among our target population and reveal several design lessons to inform the development of similar systems.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel (2006): Supporting Effective Interaction with Tabletop Groupware. In: First IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2006 5-7 January, 2006, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 55-56.

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2006): TeamSearch: Comparing Techniques for Co-Present Collaborative Search of Digital Media. In: First IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2006 5-7 January, 2006, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 97-104.

 
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Ryall, Kathy, Forlines, Clifton, Shen, Chia, Morris, Meredith Ringel and Everitt, Katherine (2006): Experiences with and Observations of Direct-Touch Tabletops. In: First IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2006 5-7 January, 2006, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 89-96.

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Cassanego, Anthony, Paepcke, Andreas, Winograd, Terry, Piper, Anne Marie and Huang, Anqi (2006): Mediating Group Dynamics through Tabletop Interface Design. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 26 (5) pp. 65-73.

 
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Ryall, Kathy, Esenther, Alan, Forlines, Clifton, Shen, Chia, Shipman, Sam, Morris, Meredith Ringel, Everitt, Katherine and Vernier, Frederic (2006): Identity-Differentiating Widgets for Multiuser Interactive Surfaces. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 26 (5) pp. 56-64.

 
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Shen, Chia, Ryall, Kathy, Forlines, Clifton, Esenther, Alan, Vernier, Frederic, Everitt, Katherine, Wu, Mike, Wigdor, Daniel, Morris, Meredith Ringel, Hancock, Mark S. and Tse, Edward (2006): Informing the Design of Direct-Touch Tabletops. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 26 (5) pp. 36-46.

2004
 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Morris, Dan and Winograd, Terry (2004): Individual audio channels with single display groupware: effects on communication and task strategy. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 242-251.

We introduce a system that allows four users to each receive sound from a private audio channel while using a shared tabletop display. In order to explore how private audio channels affect a collaborative work environment, we conducted a user study with this system. The results reveal differences in work strategies when groups are presented with individual versus public audio, and suggest that the use of private audio does not impede group communication and may positively impact group dynamics. We discuss the findings, as well as their implications for the design of future audio-based "single display privacyware" systems.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Ryall, Kathy, Shen, Chia, Forlines, Clifton and Vernier, Frederic (2004): Beyond "social protocols": multi-user coordination policies for co-located groupware. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 262-265.

The status quo for co-located groupware is to assume that "social protocols" (standards of polite behavior) are sufficient to coordinate the actions of a group of users; however, prior studies of groupware use as well as our own observations of groups using a shared tabletop display suggest potential for improving groupware interfaces by incorporating coordination policies - direct manipulation mechanisms for avoiding and resolving conflicts. We discuss our observations of group tabletop usage and present our coordination framework. We conclude with example usage scenarios and discuss future research suggested by this framework.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ryall, Kathy, Forlines, Clifton, Shen, Chia and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2004): Exploring the effects of group size and table size on interactions with tabletop shared-display groupware. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 284-293.

Interactive tabletops have been previously proposed and studied in the domain of co-located group applications. However, little fundamental research has been done to explore the issue of size. In this paper we identify a number of size considerations for tabletop design, and present an experiment to explore some of these issues, in particular the effects of group size and table size on the speed at which the task was performed, the distribution of work among group members, issues of shared resources, and user preference for table size. Our findings shed light on (1) how work strategies are affected by group size, (2) how social interaction varies with respect to table size, and (3) how the speed of task performance is influenced by group size but not by table size. In addition, our experiments revealed that for larger groups, designers might need to add additional vertical displays for shared information. This finding opens the door for extending single-display groupware to shared-display groupware settings that involve multiple, shared displays.

© All rights reserved Ryall et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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19 Jun 2007: Modified
19 Jun 2007: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/meredith_ringel_morris.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2012
Pub. count:38
Number of co-authors:52



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Terry Winograd:6
Clifton Forlines:5
Andrew D. Wilson:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Meredith Ringel Morris's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ravin Balakrishnan:108
Jacob O. Wobbrock:71
Eric Horvitz:70
 
 
 
Jul 25

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