Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2012
Pub. count:6
Number of co-authors:11



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Michael Terry:5
Benjamin Greenstein:1
Nathaniel Watson:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Matthew Kay's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Sunny Consolvo:36
Michael Terry:21
Julie A. Kientz:19
 
 
 
Jul 26

The display is the computer.

-- Jen-Hsun Huang, 2002

 
 

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Matthew Kay

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Publications by Matthew Kay (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Kay, Matthew, Choe, Eun Kyoung, Shepherd, Jesse, Greenstein, Benjamin, Watson, Nathaniel, Consolvo, Sunny and Kientz, Julie A. (2012): Lullaby: a capture & access system for understanding the sleep environment. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 226-234.

The bedroom environment can have a significant impact on the quality of a person's sleep. Experts recommend sleeping in a room that is cool, dark, quiet, and free from disruptors to ensure the best quality sleep. However, it is sometimes difficult for a person to assess which factors in the environment may be causing disrupted sleep. In this paper, we present the design, implementation, and initial evaluation of a capture and access system, called Lullaby. Lullaby combines temperature, light, and motion sensors, audio and photos, and an off-the-shelf sleep sensor to provide a comprehensive recording of a person's sleep. Lullaby allows users to review graphs and access recordings of factors relating to their sleep quality and environmental conditions to look for trends and potential causes of sleep disruptions. In this paper, we report results of a feasibility study where participants (N=4) used Lullaby in their homes for two weeks. Based on our experiences, we discuss design insights for sleep technologies, capture and access applications, and personal informatics tools.

© All rights reserved Kay et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Kay, Matthew and Terry, Michael (2010): Textured agreements: re-envisioning electronic consent. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2010. p. 13.

Research indicates that less than 2% of the population reads license agreements during software installation [12]. To address this problem, we developed textured agreements, visually redesigned agreements that employ factoids, vignettes, and iconic symbols to accentuate information and highlight its personal relevance. Notably, textured agreements accomplish these goals without requiring modification of the underlying text. A between-subjects experimental study with 84 subjects indicates these agreements can significantly increase reading times. In our study, subjects spent approximately 37 seconds on agreement screens with textured agreements, compared to 7 seconds in the plain text control condition. A follow-up study examined retention of agreement content, finding that median scores on a comprehension quiz increased by 4 out of 16 points for textured agreements. These results provide convincing evidence of the potential for textured agreements to positively impact software agreement processes.

© All rights reserved Kay and Terry and/or their publisher

 
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Terry, Michael, Kay, Matthew and Lafreniere, Ben (2010): Perceptions and practices of usability in the free/open source software (FoSS) community. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 999-1008.

This paper presents results from a study examining perceptions and practices of usability in the free/open source software (FOSS) community. 27 individuals associated with 11 different FOSS projects were interviewed to understand how they think about, act on, and are motivated to address usability issues. Our results indicate that FOSS project members possess rather sophisticated notions of software usability, which collectively mirror definitions commonly found in HCI textbooks. Our study also uncovered a wide range of practices that ultimately work to improve software usability. Importantly, these activities are typically based on close, direct interpersonal relationships between developers and their core users, a group of users who closely follow the project and provide high quality, respected feedback. These relationships, along with positive feedback from other users, generate social rewards that serve as the primary motivations for attending to usability issues on a day-to-day basis. These findings suggest a need to reconceptualize HCI methods to better fit this culture of practice and its corresponding value system.

© All rights reserved Terry et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Kay, Matthew and Terry, Michael (2010): Communicating software agreement content using narrative pictograms. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2715-2724.

We present narrative pictograms, illustrative diagrams designed to convey the abstract concepts of software agreements. Narrative pictograms arose out of a need to create software agreements that are comprehensible without written language. We first present example diagrams designed to describe the data collection policies of research software, and the composition rules used to create them. We then present our design process and lessons learned during design. Finally, we present results from an evaluation based on the ISO 9186-1 test for graphical symbols.

© All rights reserved Kay and Terry and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Kay, Matthew and Terry, Michael (2009): Textured agreements: re-envisioning electronic consent. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 35.

2008
 
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Terry, Michael, Kay, Matthew, Vugt, Brad Van, Slack, Brandon and Park, Terry (2008): Ingimp: introducing instrumentation to an end-user open source application. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 607-616.

Open source projects are gradually incorporating usability methods into their development practices, but there are still many unmet needs. One particular need for nearly any open source project is data that describes its user base, including information indicating how the software is actually used in practice. This paper presents the concept of open instrumentation, or the augmentation of an open source application to openly collect and publicly disseminate rich application usage data. We demonstrate the concept of open instrumentation in ingimp, a version of the open source GNU Image Manipulation Program that has been modified to collect end-user usage data. ingimp automatically collects five types of data: The commands used, high-level user interface events, overall features of the user's documents, summaries of the user's general computing environment, and users' own descriptions of their planned tasks. In the spirit of open source software, all collected data are made available for anyone to download and analyze. This paper's primary contributions lie in presenting the overall design of ingimp, with a particular focus on how the design addresses two prominent issues in open instrumentation: privacy and motivating use.

© All rights reserved Terry et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

23 Nov 2012: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
08 Sep 2009: Modified
12 May 2008: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/matthew_kay.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2012
Pub. count:6
Number of co-authors:11



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Michael Terry:5
Benjamin Greenstein:1
Nathaniel Watson:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Matthew Kay's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Sunny Consolvo:36
Michael Terry:21
Julie A. Kientz:19
 
 
 
Jul 26

The display is the computer.

-- Jen-Hsun Huang, 2002

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!