Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2012
Pub. count:63
Number of co-authors:84



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gary Marsden:12
George Buchanan:12
Steve Jones:11

 

 

Productive colleagues

Matt Jones's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Albrecht Schmidt:111
Stephen A. Brewste..:108
Tom Rodden:106
 
 
 

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Matt Jones

Ph.D

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Personal Homepage:
http://cs.swan.ac.uk/~csmatt/

Current place of employment:
Swansea University

Matt Jones is the co-author - with Gary Marsden - of Mobile Interaction Design and a full Professor at Swansea University. He is an active researcher and organizer of scientific conferences such as MobileHCI and has edited several special issues of journals including an ACM ToCHI journal special issue on social issues. His work has included studies and prototypes for mobile search and browsing; pedestrian navigation; and multi-modality. He has worked with several industry partners such as Microsoft Research, Reuters and Orange. He has spent time as Visiting Fellow at Nokia Research, Finland. He is also on the Scientific Advisory Board of Nokia Research (Tampere and Helsinki Labs). In 2010 he was awarded an IBM Faculty Award to work with the Spoken Web group in IBM Research India (Delhi).

 

Publications by Matt Jones (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Robinson, Simon, Jones, Matt, Vartiainen, Elina and Marsden, Gary (2012): PicoTales: collaborative authoring of animated stories using handheld projectors. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 671-680. Available online

In this article we describe a novel approach to collaborative video authoring using handheld projectors. PicoTales are created by sketching story elements on a projector+phone prototype, and then animated by moving the projected image. Movements are captured using motion sensor data, rather than visual or other tracking methods, allowing interaction and story creation anywhere. We describe in detail the design and development of our prototype device, and also address issues in position estimation and element tracking. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the prototype, demonstrating its accuracy and usability for ad-hoc creation of story videos. The potential of the system for story authoring is shown via a further experiment looking at the quality of the animated story videos produced. We conclude by considering possible future developments of the concept, and highlighting the benefits of our design for collaborative story capture.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Thom, Emma and Jones, Matt (2012): Holding onto the magic: lightweight augmentation of digital reading devices. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 510-513. Available online

Reading devices such as the Kindle are becoming widely used and many users are now routinely reading on tablet computers. The physical form factor of these devices promotes and accommodates comfortable, natural interactions, providing some of the look and feel of their paper predecessors. However, for operations such as searching and cutting and pasting, the magic and charm of paper is lost and the user has to revert to device-centred selections and menu operations. In this paper, we introduce and explore an alternative set of approaches. In the NoteDrop system we use hand-only gestures along with haptic and limited visual feedback. The aim is to enhance the active reading process with a focus on interactions with digital research documents. In addition to describing the concept prototype, we present the findings of an exploratory user-study that highlights the value and challenges of these new methods.

© All rights reserved Thom and Jones and/or ACM Press

 
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Chamberlain, Alan, Crabtree, Andy, Rodden, Tom, Jones, Matt and Rogers, Yvonne (2012): Research in the wild: understanding 'in the wild' approaches to design and development. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 795-796. Available online

We are starting to see a paradigm shift within the field of HCI. We are witnessing researchers leaving the safety and security of their controlled, lab-based environments and moving their research out into 'the wild'. Their studies are carrying out in-situ development and extended engagement, sampling experiences and working with communities in their homes and on the streets. This research has initially focused upon understanding the impacts that technological intervention has upon our day-to-day life and is leading us to explore the ways in which in-situ design, development and evaluation can be used to understand and explore these technological interventions. Is it the case that lab-based studies, taking people out of their natural environment and designing in the lab without long term user engagement are no longer appropriate to properly understand the impacts of technology in the real world?

© All rights reserved Chamberlain et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Martin, Karen, Dalton, Ben and Jones, Matt (2012): Crafting urban camouflage. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 797-798. Available online

As interactive systems become increasingly entwined with architecture, and spaces become able to detect the presence of individuals, we argue that the control of visibility as a temporary personal state should be considered in the design of public spaces. This workshop will provide the opportunity for participants to engage hands-on with a computer vision tracking system (OpenCV) and explore how low-cost materials and tools can be used to render people invisible in monitored public space. We invite researchers and practitioners from the fields of art, design, HCI, architecture and social science to consider strategies for managing personal visibility and how these relate to design and the use of technologies. The intention of the workshop is not to produce implementable designs. Instead we prefer to make speculative design scenarios that might act as future inspiration or critique. By focusing on practical strategies for managing personal visibility we hope to extend designers thinking of presence in public space beyond the purely physical to include digital representations of inhabitation that are processed and archived remotely.

© All rights reserved Martin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Frohlich, David, Robinson, Simon, Eglinton, Kristen, Jones, Matt and Vartiainen, Elina (2012): Creative cameraphone use in rural developing regions. In: Proceedings of the 14th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2012. pp. 181-190. Available online

In this paper we consider the current and future use of cameraphones in the context of rural South Africa, where many people do not have access to the latest models and ICT infrastructure is poor. We report a new study of cameraphone use in this setting, and the design and testing of a novel application for creating rich multimedia narratives and materials. We argue for better creative media applications on mobile platforms in this region, and greater attention to their local use.

© All rights reserved Frohlich et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Robinson, Simon, Rajput, Nitendra, Jones, Matt, Jain, Anupam, Sahay, Shrey and Nanavati, Amit (2011): TapBack: towards richer mobile interfaces in impoverished contexts. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2733-2736. Available online

Much of the mobile work by HCI researchers explores a future world populated by high-end devices and relatively affluent users. This paper turns to consider the hundreds of millions of people for whom such sophistication will not be realised for many years to come. In developing world contexts, people will continue to rely on voice-primary interactions due to both literacy and economic reasons. Here, we motivate research into how to accommodate advanced mobile interface techniques while overcoming the handset, data-connection and user limitations. As a first step we introduce TapBack: back-of-device taps to control a dialled-up, telephone-network-based voice service. We show how these audio gestures might be recognised over a standard telephone connection, via users' existing low-end devices. Further, in a longitudinal deployment, the techniques were made available on a live voice service used by rural Indian farmers. Data from the study illustrates the desire by users to adopt the approach and its potential extensions.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Dachselt, Raimund, Jones, Matt, Hkkil, Jonna, Lochtefeld, Markus, Rohs, Michael and Rukzio, Enrico (2011): Mobile and personal projection (MP2). In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 21-23. Available online

The emergence of mobile and personal projection devices promises new ways to display and interact with content while the user is mobile, and offer new opportunities and challenges for HCI. This workshop aims to formulate fundamental research questions around this emerging field and provides a venue for discussion for researchers and practitioners working in this area. We will focus on new interaction techniques, applications, personal projection devices, interaction design, multi-user aspects, multi-modal user interfaces and social implications. Our aim is to foster the evolution of a mobile and personal projection community.

© All rights reserved Dachselt et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Brewster, Stephen, Jones, Matt, Murray-Smith, Roderick, Nanavati, A. A., Rajput, N., Schmidt, Albrecht and Turunen, M. (2011): We need to talk: rediscovering audio for universal access. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 715-716. Available online

"In all the wonderful worlds that writing opens, the spoken word still resides and lives. Written texts all have to be related somehow, directly or indirectly, to the world of sound, the natural habitat of language, to yield their meanings." Only 22% of the human population accesses the Internet. The larger fraction of the world cannot read or write. Worldwide, 284 million people are visually impaired. And yet, there are 5.3 billion mobile subscribers, and their numbers are increasing. Much of the mobile work by HCI researchers explores a future world populated by high-end devices and relatively affluent users. This panel turns to consider the hundreds of millions of people for whom such sophistication will not be realised for many years to come. How should we design interfaces and services that are relevant and beneficial for them?

© All rights reserved Brewster et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Robinson, Simon, Jones, Matt, Eslambolchilar, Parisa, Murray-Smith, Roderick and Lindborg, Mads (2010): "I did it my way": moving away from the tyranny of turn-by-turn pedestrian navigation. In: Proceedings of 12th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2010. pp. 341-344. Available online

In this article we describe a novel approach to pedestrian navigation using bearing-based haptic feedback. People are guided in the general direction of their destination via vibration, but additional exploratory navigation is stimulated by varying feedback based on the potential for taking alternative routes. We describe two mobile prototypes that were created to examine the possible benefits of the approach. The successful use of this exploratory navigation method is demonstrated in a realistic field trial, and we discuss the results and interesting participant behaviours that were recorded.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Williamson, John, Robinson, Simon, Stewart, Craig, Murray-Smith, Roderick, Jones, Matt and Brewster, Stephen A. (2010): Social gravity: a virtual elastic tether for casual, privacy-preserving pedestrian rendezvous. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1485-1494. Available online

We describe a virtual "tether" for mobile devices that allows groups to have quick, simple and privacy-preserving meetups. Our design provides cues which allow dynamic coordination of rendezvous without revealing users' positions. Using accelerometers and magnetometers, combined with GPS positioning and non-visual feedback, users can probe and sense a dynamic virtual object representing the nearest meeting point. The Social Gravity system makes social bonds tangible in a virtual world which is geographically grounded, using haptic feedback to help users rendezvous. We show dynamic navigation using this physical model-based system to be efficient and robust in significant field trials, even in the presence of low-quality positioning. The use of simulators to build models of mobile geolocated systems for pre-validation purposes is discussed, and results compared with those from our trials. Our results show interesting behaviours in the social coordination task, which lead to guidelines for geosocial interaction design. The Social Gravity system proved to be very successful in allowing groups to rendezvous efficiently and simply and can be implemented using only commercially available hardware.

© All rights reserved Williamson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Wilson, Max L., Robinson, Simon, Craggs, Dan, Brimble, Kristian and Jones, Matt (2010): Pico-ing into the future of mobile projector phones. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3997-4002. Available online

Ten years ago we were on the verge of having cameras built into our mobile phones, but knew very little about what to expect or how they would be used. Now we are faced with the same unknowns with mobile projector phones. This research-in-progress seeks to explore how people will want to use such technology, how they will feel when using it, and what social effects we can expect to see. This paper describes our two-phase field investigation, with results and design recommendations from its first, experience-sampling phase.

© All rights reserved Wilson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Jones, Matt (2010): Journeying toward extravagant, expressive, place-based computing. In Interactions, 17 (6) pp. 26-31. Available online

2009
 
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Love, Bradley C., Jones, Matt, Tomlinson, Marc T. and Howe, Michael (2009): Learning to predict information needs: context-aware display as a cognitive aid and an assessment tool. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1351-1360. Available online

We discuss the problem of assessing and aiding user performance in dynamic tasks that require rapid selection among multiple information sources. Motivated by research in human sequential learning, we develop a system that learns by observation to predict the information a user desires in different contexts. The model decides when the display should be updated, which is akin to the problem of scene segmentation, and then selects the situationally relevant information display. The model reduces the cognitive burden of selecting situation-relevant displays. We evaluate the system in a tank video game environment and find that the system boosts user performance. The fit of the model to user data provides a quantitative assessment of user behavior, which is useful in assessing individual differences and the progression from novice- to expert-level proficiency. We discuss the relative benefits of adopting a learning approach to predicting information preferences and possible avenues to reduce the negative consequences of automation.

© All rights reserved Love et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Frohlich, David M., Rachovides, Dorothy, Riga, Kiriaki, Bhat, Ramnath, Frank, Maxine, Edirisinghe, Eran, Wickramanayaka, Dhammike, Jones, Matt and Harwood, Will (2009): StoryBank: mobile digital storytelling in a development context. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1761-1770. Available online

Mobile imaging and digital storytelling currently support a growing practice of multimedia communication in the West. In this paper we describe a project which explores their benefit in the East, to support non-textual information sharing in an Indian village. Local audiovisual story creation and sharing activities were carried out in a one month trial, using 10 customized cameraphones and a digital library of stories represented on a village display. The findings show that the system was usable by a cross-section of the community and valued for its ability to express a mixture of development and community information in an accessible form. Lessons for the role of HCI in this context are also discussed.

© All rights reserved Frohlich et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Frohlich, David M., Bhat, Ramnath, Jones, Matt, Lalmas, Mounia, Frank, Maxine, Rachovides, Dorothy, Tucker, Roger C. F. and Riga, Kiriaki (2009): Democracy, Design, and Development in Community Content Creation: Lessons From the StoryBank Project. In Information Technologies & International Development, 5 (4) pp. 19-36. Available online

Mobile and Web 2.0 technology have the very real potential to democratize the creation and sharing of multimedia content in developing communities, even beyond the levels currently seen in community radio and television. In this article, we report the findings of an exercise to test this potential in partnership with a Budikote village in southern India. We show how a system called StoryBank supported the creation of short digital stories on a text-free camera phone, and how these stories could be shared through a community repository and touch-screen display. Despite the success of a field trial in which 137 stories were created and shared over a one-month period, various technical and social factors meant that the devices and content were more hierarchically managed and controlled than expected. The implications of these experiences for rural development and community-centered design are discussed.

© All rights reserved Frohlich et al. and/or USC Annenberg Press

 
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Robinson, Simon, Eslambolchilar, Parisa and Jones, Matt (2009): Sweep-Shake: finding digital resources in physical environments. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 12. Available online

In this article we describe the Sweep-Shake system, a novel, low interaction cost approach to supporting the spontaneous discovery of geo-located information. By sweeping a mobile device around their environment, users browse for interesting information related to points of interest. We built a mobile haptic prototype which encourages the user to explore their surroundings to search for location information, helping them discover this by providing directional vibrotactile feedback. Once potential targets are selected, the interaction is extended to offer an hierarchy of information levels with a simple method for filtering and selecting desired types of data for each geo-tagged location. We describe and motivate our approach and present a short field trial to situate our design in a real environment, followed by a more detailed user study that compares it against an equivalent visual-based system.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Robinson, Simon, Eslambolchilar, Parisa and Jones, Matt (2009): Evaluating haptics for information discovery while walking. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 93-102. Available online

In this article we describe and evaluate a novel, low interaction cost approach to supporting the spontaneous discovery of geo-tagged information while on the move. Our mobile haptic prototype helps users to explore their environment by providing directional vibrotactile feedback based on the presence of location data. We conducted a study to investigate whether users can find these targets while walking, comparing their performance when using only haptic feedback to that when using an equivalent visual system. The results are encouraging, and here we present our findings, discussing their significance and issues relevant to the design of future systems that combine haptics with location awareness.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Jones, Matt, Thom, Emma, Bainbridge, David and Frohlich, David (2009): Mobility, digital libraries and a rural indian village. In: JCDL09 Proceedings of the 2009 Joint International Conference on Digital Libraries 2009. pp. 309-312. Available online

Millions of people in developed countries routinely create and share digital content; but what about the billions of others in on the wrong side of what has been called the 'global digital divide'? This paper considers three mobile platforms to illustrate their potential in enabling rural Indian villagers to make and share digital stories. We describe our experiences in creating prototypes using mobile phones; high-end media-players; and, paper. Interaction designs are discussed along with findings from various trials within the village and elsewhere. Our approach has been to develop prototypes that can work together in an integrated fashion so that content can flow freely and in interesting ways through the village. While our work has particular relevance to those users in emerging world contexts, we see it also informing needs and practices in the developed world for user-generated content.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Watson, Patrick G., Duquenoy, Penny, Brennan, Margaret, Jones, Matt and Walkerdine, James (2009): Towards an ethical interaction design: the issue of including stakeholders in law-enforcement software development. In: Proceedings of OZCHI09, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009. pp. 313-316. Available online

In the public sector (particularly in the UK in light of recent reforms i.e. the Local Government Act 2000, etc.) a greater degree of accountability and public involvement or intervention has become the norm in public infrastructure projects, partially under the rubric of "stakeholder engagement". This paper seeks to discuss public involvement in a law-enforcement technology (Isis), which operates on a covert basis in the detection and prevention of child abuse activities across a number of social networking facilities. Our contribution to the development of Isis is to perform an ethics centered consultation process with stakeholders who will contribute to the design and deployment of the end software package. To that end, we have sought to develop a "Modified Participatory Design" approach, utilizing the knowledge gained from the HCI community with regards to more traditional design projects and adapting this body of work to questions of ethics, privacy, corporate and civic responsibility, monitoring and awareness issues, etc. in an effort to create a fluid and agile communication process between stakeholders and designers, thus taking account of the ethical issues around Isis as design occurs.

© All rights reserved Watson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Jones, Matt (2009): Book Review "Handbook of Research on User Interface Design and Mobile Evaluation for Mobile Technology" by Joanna Lumsden. In International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 1 (1) pp. 98-100. Available online

2008
 
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Jones, Matt, Harwood, William, Buchanan, George, Frohlich, David, Rachovides, Dorothy, Lalmas, Mounia and Frank, Maxine (2008): Narrowcast yourself: Designing for Community Storytelling in a Rural Indian Context. In: Proceedings of the 7th ACM conference on Designing interactive systems 25-27 February, 2008, Cape Town. pp. 369-378.

The StoryBank project is examining technologies and practices to allow digitally impoverished communities to take part in the user-generated content revolution. The approach involves combining mobile phones to create audio-visual stories and a touch screen display situated in a community meeting place. This paper discusses the design, evaluation and refinement of the situated display. We consider how our experiences of working with a rural Indian village community influenced design processes, principles and prototypes. The work highlights the value of community-centred design practices and prototypes in such developing-world contexts.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or ACM

 
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Jones, Matt, Harwood, Will, Bainbridge, David, Buchanan, George, Frohlich, David, Rachovides, Dorothy, Frank, Maxine and Lalmas, Mounia (2008): "Narrowcast yourself": designing for community storytelling in a rural Indian context. In: Proceedings of DIS08 Designing Interactive Systems 2008. pp. 369-378. Available online

The StoryBank project is examining technologies and practices to allow digitally impoverished communities to take part in the user-generated content revolution. The approach involves combining mobile phones to create audio-visual stories and a touch screen display situated in a community meeting place. This paper discusses the design, evaluation and refinement of the situated display. We consider how our experiences of working with a rural Indian village community influenced design processes, principles and prototypes. The work highlights the value of community-centred design practices and prototypes in such developing-world contexts.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bainbridge, David, Jones, Steve, McIntosh, Sam, Jones, Matt and Witten, Ian H. (2008): Portable digital libraries on an iPod. In: JCDL08 Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2008. pp. 333-336. Available online

This paper describes the facilities we built to run a self-contained digital library on an iPod. The digital library software used was the open source package Greenstone, and the paper highlights the technical problems that were encountered and solved. It attempts to convey a feeling for the kind of issues that must be faced when adapting standard DL software for non-standard, leading-edge devices.

© All rights reserved Bainbridge et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bainbridge, David, Jones, Steve, McIntosh, Sam, Jones, Matt and Witten, Ian H. (2008): Running Greenstone on an iPod. In: JCDL08 Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2008. p. 419. Available online

The open source digital library software Greenstone is demonstrated running on an iPod. The standalone configuration supports browsing, searching and displaying documents in a range of media formats. Plugged in to a host computer (Mac, Linux, or Windows), the exact same facilities are made available to the world through a built-in web server.

© All rights reserved Bainbridge et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Robinson, Simon, Eslambolchilar, Parisa and Jones, Matt (2008): Point-to-GeoBlog: Gestures and Sensors to Support User Generated Content Creation. In: Proceedings of the 10th international conference on Human computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2008. pp. 197-206. Available online

 
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Robinson, Simon, Eslambolchilar, Parisa and Jones, Matt (2008): Point-to-GeoBlog: gestures and sensors to support user generated content creation. In: Hofte, G. Henri ter, Mulder, Ingrid and Ruyter, Boris E. R. de (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2008 September 2-5, 2008, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. pp. 197-206. Available online

 
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Jones, Matt, Jones, Steve, Bradley, Gareth, Warren, Nigel, Bainbridge, David and Holmes, Geoff (2008): ONTRACK: Dynamically adapting music playback to support navigation. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 12 (7) pp. 513-525. Available online

 
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Frohlich, David and Jones, Matt (2008): Audiophoto narratives for semi-literate communities. In Interactions, 15 (6) pp. 61-64. Available online

2007
 
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Jones, Matt, Buchanan, George, Harper, Richard and Xech, Pierre-Louis (2007): Questions not answers: a novel mobile search technique. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 155-158. Available online

Mobile search is becoming an increasingly important user activity. In this paper, instead of investigating the most efficient and effective ways of providing search results, the answers, we consider the value of giving access to previous queries, the questions, relating to a user's location. By exposing what other people have searched for, the aim is to provide useful insights into a location's character. To consider the value of the approach we deployed two mobile probes in a large-scale field study involving 391 participants. Our experiences suggest that presenting users with other people's in situ queries influences their information seeking interactions positively.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Matt, Harwood, Will, Buchanan, George and Lalmas, Mounia (2007): StoryBank: an indian village community digital library. In: JCDL07: Proceedings of the 7th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2007. pp. 257-258. Available online

This paper considers information access styles for a community digital library in an Indian village. We present our impressions of the community gathered during a field-study and show how these have influenced the interaction design. The prototype aims to overcome low-textual literacy and lack of computing experience by combining touch-based interaction, engaging visual presentations and drawing on villagers' familiarity with radio listening.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Lalmas, Mounia, Bhat, Ramnath, Frank, Maxine, Frohlich, David M. and Jones, Matt (2007): Bridging the digital divide: understanding information access practices in an indian village community. In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2007. pp. 741-742. Available online

For digital library and information retrieval technologies to provide solutions for bridging the digital divide in developing countries, we need to understand the information access practices of remote and often poor communities in these countries. We must understand the information needs of these communities, and the best means to provide them access to relevant information. To this end, we investigated the current information access practices in an Indian village.

© All rights reserved Lalmas et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Arter, David, Buchanan, George, Jones, Matt and Harper, Richard (2007): Incidental information and mobile search. In: Cheok, Adrian David and Chittaro, Luca (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2007 September 9-12, 2007, Singapore. pp. 413-420. Available online

2006
 
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Jones, Matt and Marsden, Gary (2006): Mobile interaction design. John Wiley and Sons

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Jones, Matt (2006): Voices across the digital divide. In Interactions, 13 (3) pp. 16-17.

 
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Jones, Matt and Jones, Steve (2006): The music is the message. In Interactions, 13 (4) pp. 24-27.

 
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Patel, Dynal, Marsden, Gary, Jones, Matt and Jones, Steve (2006): Improving photo searching interfaces for small-screen mobile computers. In: Proceedings of 8th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2006. pp. 149-156. Available online

In this paper, we conduct a thorough investigation of how people search their photo collections for events (a set of photographs relating to a particular well defined event), singles (individual photographs) and properties (a set of photographs with a common theme) on PDAs. We describe a prototype system that allows us to expose many issues that must be considered when designing photo searching interfaces. We discuss each of these issues and make recommendations where applicable. Our major observation is that several different methods are used to locate photographs. In light of this, we conclude by discussing how photo searching interfaces might embody or support such an approach.

© All rights reserved Patel et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Schmidt-Belz, Barbara and Jones, Matt (2006): Mobile usage of video and TV. In: Proceedings of 8th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2006. pp. 291-292. Available online

This workshop aims to review and discuss research on mobile usage of multimedia, in particular of video and TV on mobile devices. The workshop focuses on human behaviour, human needs, and interaction design concerning the creation, management, and consumption of moving images using mobile devices.

© All rights reserved Schmidt-Belz and Jones and/or ACM Press

 
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Crestani, Fabio, Jones, Matt and Mizzaro, Stefano (2006): MUIA 2006: third international workshop on mobile and ubiquitous information access. In: Proceedings of 8th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2006. pp. 299-300. Available online

The recent trend towards pervasive computing and information technology becoming omnipresent and entering all aspects of modern living, means that we are moving away from the traditional interaction paradigm between human and technology being that of the desktop computer. This shift towards ubiquitous computing is perhaps most evident in the increased sophistication and extended utility of mobile devices, such as mobile phones, PDAs, mobile communicators (telephone/PDA) and Tablet PCs. Advances in these mobile device technologies coupled with their much-improved functionality means that current mobile devices can be considered as multi-purpose information access tools capable of complex tasks. This Third Workshop on Mobile and Ubiquitous Information Access (MUIA 2006) aims to be a forum for the presentation of current research and exchange of experiences into technological and usability aspects of mobile information access.

© All rights reserved Crestani et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crestani, Fabio, Jones, Matt and Mizzaro, Stefano (2006): MUIA 2006: third international workshop on mobile and ubiquitous information access. In: Nieminen, Marko and Roykkee, Mika (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006 September 12-15, 2006, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 299-300. Available online

 
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Patel, Dynal, Marsden, Gary, Jones, Matt and Jones, Steve (2006): Improving photo searching interfaces for small-screen mobile computers. In: Nieminen, Marko and Roykkee, Mika (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006 September 12-15, 2006, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 149-156. Available online

 
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Schmidt-Belz, Barbara and Jones, Matt (2006): Mobile usage of video and TV. In: Nieminen, Marko and Roykkee, Mika (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006 September 12-15, 2006, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 291-292. Available online

 
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Crestani, Fabio, Dunlop, Mark D., Jones, Matt, Jones, Steve and Mizzaro, Stefano (2006): Theme issue on interactive mobile information access. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 10 (4) pp. 193-194. Available online

 
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Jones, Matt, Buchanan, George, Cheng, Tzu-Chiang and Jain, Preeti (2006): Changing the pace of search: Supporting background information seeking. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57 (6) pp. 838-842. Available online

2005
 
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Jones, Steve, Jones, Matt, Marsden, Gary, Patel, Dynal and Cockburn, Andy (2005): An evaluation of integrated zooming and scrolling on small screens. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 63 (3) pp. 271-303. Available online

Speed-dependent automatic zooming (SDAZ) has been proposed for standard desktop displays as a means of overcoming problems associated with the navigation of large information spaces. SDAZ combines zooming and panning facilities into a single operation, with the magnitude of both factors dependent on simple user interaction. Previous research indicated dramatic user performance improvements when using the technique for document and map navigation tasks. In this paper, we propose algorithmic extensions to the technique for application on small-screen devices and present a comparative experimental evaluation of user performance with the system and a normative scroll-zoom-pan interface. Users responded positively to the system, particularly in relation to reduced physical navigational workload. However, the reduced screen space reduced the impact of SDAZ in comparison to that reported in previous studies. In fact, for one-dimensional navigation (vertical document navigation) the normative interface out-performed SDAZ. For navigation in two dimensions (map browsing) SDAZ supports more accurate target location, and also produces longer task completion times. Some SDAZ users became lost within the information space and were unable to recover navigational context. We discuss the reasons for these observations and suggest ways in which limitations of SDAZ in the small-screen context may be overcome.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Warren, Nigel, Jones, Matt, Jones, Steve and Bainbridge, David (2005): Navigation via continuously adapted music. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1849-1852. Available online

Listening to music on personal, digital devices while mobile is an enjoyable, everyday activity. We explore a scheme for exploiting this practice to immerse listeners in navigation cues. Our prototype, Ontrack, continuously adapts audio, modifying the spatial balance and volume to lead listeners to their target destination. An initial lab-based evaluation has demonstrated the approach's efficacy: users were able to complete tasks within a reasonable time and their subjective feedback was positive. Encouraged by these findings, we are building a pocket-sized prototype for further testing.

© All rights reserved Warren et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Matt and Marsden, Gary (2005): Mobile interaction design tutorial. In: Proceedings of 7th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2005. pp. 369-370. Available online

The tutorial explores interesting and empowering mobile design philosophies, principles and methods as well as giving specific guidance on key emerging consumer application areas such as image browsing and information access.

© All rights reserved Jones and Marsden and/or ACM Press

 
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Cunningham, Sally Jo and Jones, Matt (2005): Autoethnography: a tool for practice and education. In: Proceedings of CHINZ05, the ACM SIGCHI New Zealand Chapters International Conference on Computer-Human Interaction 2005. pp. 1-8. Available online

Ethnographic techniques are useful tools for developing a fine-grained, context-based understanding of user behavior. Because conventional ethnographic studies are time-intensive, interest has grown in techniques that can be applied more rapidly, to fit within the software development cycle -- a sort of 'ethnography lite'. One such promising tool is the autoethnography, in which the investigator creates an ethnographic description and analysis of his/her own behavior, attempting to develop an objective understanding of the behaviors and work context under consideration by casting the investigator as both the informant 'insider' and the analyst 'outsider'. We demonstrate the potential of the autoethnography in HCI education through a case study of an HCI assignment in which autoethnography informs requirements analysis and system design. This paper argues that the autoethnography has a role to play in software development and is a useful teaching tool for HCI courses.

© All rights reserved Cunningham and Jones and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Matt and Marsden, Gary (2005): Mobile interaction design tutorial. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Mihalic, Kristijan (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2005 September 19-22, 2005, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 369-370. Available online

2004
 
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Buchanan, George, Blandford, Ann, Thimbleby, Harold and Jones, Matt (2004): Integrating information seeking and structuring: exploring the role of spatial hypertext in a digital library. In: Proceedings of the Fifteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2004. pp. 225-234. Available online

This paper presents Garnet, a novel spatial hypertext interface to a digital library. Garnet supports both information structuring - via spatial hypertext - and traditional information seeking - via a digital library. A user study of Garnet is reported, together with an analysis of how the organizing work done by users in a spatial hypertext workspace could support later information seeking. The use of Garnet during the study is related to both digital library and spatial hypertext research. Spatial hypertexts support the detection of implicit document groups in a user's workspace. The study also investigates the degree of similarity found in the full text of documents within such document groups.

© All rights reserved Buchanan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Chu, Yi-Chun, Bainbridge, David, Jones, Matt and Witten, Ian H. (2004): Realistic books: a bizarre homage to an obsolete medium?. In: JCDL04: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2004. pp. 78-86. Available online

For many readers, handling a physical book is an enjoyably exquisite part of the information seeking process. Many physical characteristics of a book-its size, heft, the patina of use on its pages and so on-communicate ambient qualities of the document it represents. In contrast, the experience of accessing and exploring digital library documents is often dull. The emphasis is utilitarian; technophile rather than bibliophile. We have extended the page-turning algorithm we reported at last year's JCDL into a scaleable, systematic approach that allows users to view and interact with realistic visualizations of any textual-based document in a Greenstone collection. Here, we further motivate the approach, illustrate the system in use, discuss the system architecture and present a user evaluation Our work leads us to believe that far from being a whimsical gimmick, physical book models can usefully complement conventional document viewers and increase the perceived value of a digital library system.

© All rights reserved Chu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crestani, Fabio, Jones, Matt and Mizzaro, Stefano (2004): Second International Workshop on Mobile and Ubiquitous Information Access. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 529-530. Available online

 
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Jones, Matt and Marsden, Gary (2004): "Please Turn ON Your Mobile Phone" - First Impressions of Text-Messaging in Lectures. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 436-440. Available online

 
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Patel, Dynal, Marsden, Gary, Jones, Steve and Jones, Matt (2004): An Evaluation of Techniques for Browsing Photograph Collections on Small Displays. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 132-143. Available online

 
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Jones, Steve, Jones, Matt and Deo, Shaleen (2004): Using keyphrases as search result surrogates on small screen devices. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (1) pp. 55-68. Available online

2003
 
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Jones, Matt, Buchanan, George and Thimbleby, Harold (2003): Improving web search on small screen devices. In Interacting with Computers, 15 (4) pp. 479-495.

Small handheld devices -- mobile phones, Pocket PCs etc. -- are increasingly being used to access the web. Search engines are the most used web services and are an important factor of user support. Search engine providers have begun to offer their services on the small screen. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of the how easy to use such services are in these new contexts. An experiment was carried out to compare users' abilities to complete search tasks using a mobile phone-sized, handheld computer-sized and conventional, desktop interface to the full Google index. With all three interfaces, when users succeed in completing a task, they do so quickly (within 2-3 min) and using few interactions with the search engine. When they fail, though, they fail badly. The paper examines the causes of failures in small screen searching and proposes guidelines for improving these interfaces. In addition, we present and discuss novel interaction schemes that put these guidelines into practice.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Jones, Matt, Jain, Preeti, Buchanan, George and Marsden, Gary (2003): Using a Mobile Device to Vary the Pace of Search. In: Chittaro, Luca (ed.) Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - 5th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2003 September 8-11, 2003, Udine, Italy. pp. 390-394. Available online

2002
 
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Dunlop, Hayley, Cunningham, Sally Jo and Jones, Matt (2002): A digital library of conversational expressions: helping profoundly disabled users communicate. In: JCDL02: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2002. pp. 273-274. Available online

Digital libraries are for everyone. This paper describes the development of a digital library for a user who has a profound physical disability that means she cannot communicate verbally, and cannot use conventional communication tools.

© All rights reserved Dunlop et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Matt, Buchanan, George and Thimbleby, Harold W. (2002): Sorting Out Searching on Small Screen Devices. In: Paterno, Fabio (ed.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - 4th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2002 September 18-20, 2002, Pisa, Italy. pp. 81-94. Available online

 
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Marsden, Gary, Thimbleby, Harold W., Jones, Matt and Gillary, Paul (2002): Data Structures in the Design of Interfaces. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 6 (2) pp. 132-140. Available online

 
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Thimbleby, Harold W. and Jones, Matt (2002): Obituary for a Fax. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 6 (2) pp. 151-152. Available online

2001
 
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Thimbleby, Harold, Cairns, Paul and Jones, Matt (2001): Usability analysis with Markov models. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 8 (2) pp. 99-132. Available online

How hard to users to find interactive devices to use to achieve their goals, and how can we get this information early enough to influence design? We show that Markov modeling can obtain suitable measures, and we provide formulas that can be used for a large class of systems. We analyze and consider alternative designs for various real examples. We introduce a "knowldege/usability graph," which shows the impact of even a smaller amount of knowledge for the user, and the extent to which designers' knowledge may bias their views of usability. Markov models can be built into design tools, and can therefore be made very convenient for designers to utilize. One would hope that in the future, design tools would include such mathematical analysis, and no new design skills would be required to evaluate devices. A particular concern of this paper is to make the approach accessible. Complete program code and all the underlying mathematics are provided in appendices to enable others to replicate and test all results shown.

© All rights reserved Thimbleby et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Buchanan, George, Farrant, Sarah, Jones, Matt, Thimbleby, Harold, Marsden, Gary and Pazzani, Michael (2001): Improving mobile internet usability. In: Proceedings of the 2001 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2001. pp. 673-680. Available online

1999
 
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Jones, Matt, Buchanan, George and Mohd-Nasir, Norliza (1999): An Evaluation of WebTwig - A Site Outliner for Handheld Web Access. In: Gellersen, Hans-Werner (ed.) Handheld and Ubiquitous Computing - First International Symposium - HUC99 September 27-29, 1999, Karlsruhe, Germany. pp. 343-345. Available online

 
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