Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2011
Pub. count:15
Number of co-authors:15



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Frank Vetere:11
Florian Mueller:7
Stefan Agamanolis:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Martin R. Gibbs's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jesper Kjeldskov:63
Steve Howard:57
Frank Vetere:42
 
 
 
Jul 31

Design is the art of gradually applying constraints until only one solution remains.

-- Unknown

 
 

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Martin R. Gibbs

Ph.D

Picture of Martin R. Gibbs.
Personal Homepage:
people.eng.unimelb.edu.au/martinrg/index.html


Current place of employment:
The University of Melbourne

Dr Martin Gibbs is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computing and Information Systems at The University of Melbourne.In collaboration with colleagues at The University of Melbourne, he is currently investigating how people use a variety of interactive technologies (video games, community networks, mobile phones, etc.) for convivial and sociable purposes in a variety of situations (intimate strong-tie relationships, local neighborhoods, work-based occupational communities, online computer games). He is recuiting participants for the Social World of Raiding Project. This project forms part of an ongoing research agenda examining Social Engagement and Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games. He is also working on the project, Death, Grieving and Memorialization in a Broadband Enabled Society in collaboration Michael Arnold and Tamara Kohn. This project is being supported with a seeding grant from the Institute for Broadband Enabled Society. His teaching is currently focused on professional development for information systems students as well as the social, legal and ethical issues and dilemmas surrounding information and communication technologies in contemporary society. He is also involved in teaching research methods and e-Science.

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Publications by Martin R. Gibbs (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Edge, Darren, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Agamanolis, Stefan, Bongers, Bert and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2011): Designing sports: a framework for exertion games. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2651-2660.

Exertion games require investing physical effort. The fact that such games can support physical health is tempered by our limited understanding of how to design for engaging exertion experiences. This paper introduces the Exertion Framework as a way to think and talk about Exertion Games, both for their formative design and summative analysis. Our Exertion Framework is based on the ways in which we can conceive of the body investing in game-directed exertion, supported by four perspectives on the body (the Responding Body, Moving Body, Sensing Body and Relating Body) and three perspectives on gaming (rules, play and context). The paper illustrates how this framework was derived from prior systems and theory, and presents a case study of how it has been used to inspire novel exertion interactions.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Mueller, Florian, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Edge, Darren, Agamanolis, Stefan and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2010): Jogging over a distance between Europe and Australia. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 189-198.

Exertion activities, such as jogging, require users to invest intense physical effort and are associated with physical and social health benefits. Despite the benefits, our understanding of exertion activities is limited, especially when it comes to social experiences. In order to begin understanding how to design for technologically augmented social exertion experiences, we present "Jogging over a Distance", a system in which spatialized audio based on heart rate allowed runners as far apart as Europe and Australia to run together. Our analysis revealed how certain aspects of the design facilitated a social experience, and consequently we describe a framework for designing augmented exertion activities. We make recommendations as to how designers could use this framework to aid the development of future social systems that aim to utilize the benefits of exertion.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2009): Design influence on social play in distributed exertion games. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1539-1548.

Exertion games are an emerging form of interactive games that require players to invest significant physical effort as part of the gameplay, rather than just pressing buttons. These exertion games have potential health benefits by promoting exercise. It is also believed that they can facilitate social play between players and that social play can improve participation in exertion games. However, there is currently a lack of understanding of how to design games to support these effects. In this paper, we present a qualitative case study that illustrates how networked environments support social play in exertion games and how this can help to gain an understanding of existing games and support the design of future games. This work offers a preliminary analytical and descriptive account of the relationship between exertion and social play in such a game and highlights the influence of design with the aim of utilizing the attributed benefits of exertion and social play.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2009): The mousegrip. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3199-3204.

Computer games, often played with others, are a compelling pastime for many. However, they have been criticized for their mouse and keyboard or gamepad interactions, as they support a sedentary lifestyle. In contrast, a "hand exerciser" handgrip device can help strengthen hand and forearm muscles extensively through a simple spring mechanism. Our system "mousegrip" is an exertion interface to control computer applications while simultaneously exercising hand and arm muscles based on a handgrip device. We present a casual game of pong for two distributed players who control the game with a mousegrip each, demonstrating a low-cost approach to "exertion interactions over a distance". By showing how easy it can be to include exertion in interactions with computers, we hope to encourage other researchers and designers to consider exertion activity in their designs in order to support a healthy lifestyle.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Agamanolis, Stefan, Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2009): Remote impact: shadowboxing over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3531-3532.

Exertion games -- games that require physical effort from the user -- have been attributed with many social, mental and in particular physical health benefits. However, research has shown that most current implementations support only light or moderate exercise. We are presenting "Remote Impact -- Shadowboxing over a Distance", in which players punch and kick a life-size shadow of a remote participant in order to win the game. The game includes a novel multi-touch large-scale interaction surface that is soft (so no-one gets hurt), but can detect the location as well as the intensity of the players' even most extreme impacts. Remote Impact shows that computer-augmented games can support extreme exertion while supporting novel experiences, such as a reduced risk of injury and supporting distant players, offering a new way of thinking in which areas Human-Computer Interaction research can contribute to our lives.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wadley, Greg, Gibbs, Martin R. and Ducheneaut, Nicolas (2009): You can be too rich: mediated communication in a virtual world. In: Proceedings of OZCHI09, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009. pp. 49-56.

Internet-based virtual worlds (VWs) have emerged as a popular form of collaborative virtual environment. Most have offered only text chat for user communication; however several VWs have recently introduced voice. While research has demonstrated benefits of voice, its introduction into the popular VW Second Life (SL) was controversial, and some users have rejected it. In order to understand the benefits and problems that voice brings to virtual worlds, we used qualitative methods to gather data from SL users and analyse it. We discuss our results in the light of media-richness theory and its critiques, arguing that preferences for voice or text reflect a broader problem of managing social presence in virtual contexts.

© All rights reserved Wadley et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Mueller, Florian, Agamanolis, Stefan, Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2008): Remote impact: shadowboxing over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2291-2296.

People use a wide range of intensity when interacting with artifacts and one another, spanning from subtle to brute force. However, computer interfaces so far have mainly focused on interactions restrained to limited force and do not consider extreme physical and brutal interactions, such as those encountered in contact sports. We present an interactive demonstrator that aims to facilitate "Brute Force" activities to aid designers who want to leverage the physical and mental health benefits of such forceful interactions. Our prototype demonstrates that augmenting Brute Force with computing technology can be beneficial: unlike traditional contact sports experiences, it supports distributed participants. Our aim is to encourage designers to extend their supported interactions to include extreme forceful behaviors, which can contribute to general fitness and weight loss while at the same time allowing socializing in an entertaining sportive way.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2008): Taxonomy of exertion games. In: Proceedings of OZCHI08 - the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 263-266.

A new set of computationally-augmented games have emerged recently that require the user to move their body. These exertion games are believed to contribute to social, mental and in particular, physical benefits, marking a change in how we perceive computer gaming. However, although these games are a commercial success, research is lacking a theoretical understanding how to analyse existing and guide future designs. We present initial investigations towards a taxonomy of such exertion games with a focus on social aspects, based on work on traditional play and sports. Our contribution lays the foundation for the creation of a theoretical framework on exertion games, expanding our understanding of this exciting new area.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mueller, Florian, Gibbs, Martin R., Vetere, Frank and Agamanolis, Stefan (2008): Design space of networked exertion games demonstrated by a three-way physical game based on Table Tennis. In Computers in Entertainment, 6 (3) .

2007
 
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Mueller, Florian and Gibbs, Martin R. (2007): Evaluating a distributed physical leisure game for three players. In: Proceedings of OZCHI07, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 28-30, 2007, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 143-150.

Physical leisure activities such as table tennis provide healthy exercise and can offer a means to connect with others socially; however, players have to be in the same physical location to play. We have developed a networked table tennis-like game that is played with a real paddle and ball, augmented with a large-scale videoconference. Unlike existing commercial console games that encourage physical activity, our system supports social interaction through an audio and video communication channel, offers a familiar gaming interface comparable to a traditional leisure game, provides non-virtual force feedback and can be enjoyed by players in three geographically separate locations simultaneously. We are presenting results from an empirical evaluation of "Table Tennis for Three" with 41 participants. The players reported that they had fun, used the game to build social rapport and experienced a sense of playing "together". Some participants did not enjoy the game, and we present informed opinions to explain their reactions. With our work, we provide other HCI researchers with a further example of an evaluation of a novel type of experience that lies in the realms of physical activity, fun and social interactions. We hope we can inspire designers to consider our results in their future game designs by looking at the characteristics of traditional physical leisure games to promote similar benefits such as exercise, enjoyment and bringing people together to socialize.

© All rights reserved Mueller and Gibbs and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian and Gibbs, Martin R. (2007): Building a table tennis game for three players. In: Inakage, Masa, Lee, Newton, Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Natkin, Stéphane (eds.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2007 June 13-15, 2007, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 179-182.

2005
 
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Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Kjeldskov, Jesper, Howard, Steve, Mueller, Florian, Pedell, Sonja, Mecoles, Karen and Bunyan, Marcus (2005): Mediating intimacy: designing technologies to support strong-tie relationships. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 471-480.

Intimacy is a crucial element of domestic life, and many interactive technologies designed for other purposes have been appropriated for use within intimate relationships. However, there is a deficit in current understandings of how technologies are used within intimate relationships, and how to design technologies to support intimate acts. In this paper we report on work that has addressed these deficits. We used cultural probes and contextual interviews and other ethnographically informed techniques to investigate how interactive technologies are used within intimate relationships. From this empirical work we generated a thematic understanding of intimacy and the use of interactional technologies to support intimate acts. We used this understanding to inform the design of intimate technologies. A selection of our design concepts is also presented.

© All rights reserved Vetere et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapters:

User Experience and Experience Design: [/encyclopedia/user_experience_and_experience_design.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Mueller, Florian, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Kjeldskov, Jesper, Pedell, Sonja and Howard, Steve (2005): Hug over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1673-1676.

People in close relationships, who are separated by distance, often have difficulty expressing intimacy adequately. Based on the results of an ethnographic study with couples, a prototype was developed to test the feasibility of technology in the domain of intimacy. Hug Over a Distance is an air-inflatable vest that can be remotely triggered to create a sensation resembling a hug. Although the couples did not consider the vest to be useful in their daily lives, the prototype served to provoke and stimulate design ideas from the couples during participative design workshops. An additional and unexpected benefit was also found: the prototype enhanced the couples' understanding of the researchers' methods, suggesting that prototypes can serve as tools to make participatory design volunteers aware of their importance in academic research.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Human-Robot Interaction: [/encyclopedia/human-robot_interaction.html]


 
 
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Gibbs, Martin R., Vetere, Frank, Bunyan, Marcus and Howard, Steve (2005): SynchroMate: a phatic technology for mediating intimacy. In: Proceedings of the Conference on Designing for User Experiences DUX05 2005. p. 37.

By and large interaction design has been concerned with information exchange -- technologies for the collection, processing and transmission of informational content. This design sketch discusses preliminary ideas about an alternative way to think about interactive technologies -- phatic technologies -- that are less concerned with capturing and communicating information and more about the establishment and maintenance of social connection. Drawing on insights and inspiration gleaned from a recent field-based study of the role of interactive technologies within intimate relationships we outline our preliminary ideas concerning technologies to support phatic interaction. Using the materials collected during our fieldwork as design inspirations, we developed design sketches for phatic technologies intended to support playful connection between intimates. One of these sketches -- SynchroMate -- is presented. SynchroMate is a phatic technology designed to mediate intimacy by affording serendipitous synchronous exchanges.

© All rights reserved Gibbs et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper, Gibbs, Martin R., Vetere, Franks, Howard, Steve, Pedell, Sonja, Mecoles, Karen and Bunyan, Marcus (2004): Using Cultural Probes to Explore Mediated Intimacy. In Australasian Journal of Information Systems, 11 (2) pp. 102-115.

Intimacy is a crucial element of domestic life that has received insufficient attention from Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) researchers despite their rapidly growing interest in the design of interactive technologies for domestic use. Intimate acts differ from other activities, and there are unexplored opportunities to develop interactive technologies to support these acts. This paper presents the first phase of a two-part study exploring the potential of interactive technologies to support intimate relationships. We contribute to this uncharted domain of HCI research a literature review of concepts useful in understanding intimacy and methods for its investigation. We conclude with preliminary results and suggestive design ideas for interactive technologies intended to support intimacy.

© All rights reserved Kjeldskov et al. and/or University of Wollongong

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Changes to this page (author)

04 Dec 2012: Added
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05 Jul 2011: Modified
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03 Nov 2010: Modified
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/martin_r__gibbs.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2011
Pub. count:15
Number of co-authors:15



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Frank Vetere:11
Florian Mueller:7
Stefan Agamanolis:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Martin R. Gibbs's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jesper Kjeldskov:63
Steve Howard:57
Frank Vetere:42
 
 
 
Jul 31

Design is the art of gradually applying constraints until only one solution remains.

-- Unknown

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!