Publication statistics

Pub. period:1982-2004
Pub. count:19
Number of co-authors:12



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Glenn Pearson:3
Joline Morrison:2
Joyce Lucca:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mark Weiser's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Nicholas C. Romano..:34
Randall H. Trigg:22
 
 
 

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Mark Weiser

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Mark D. Weiser (1952 - 1999) was a chief scientist at Xerox PARC in the United States. Weiser is widely considered to be the father of ubiquitous computing, a term he coined in 1988.

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Publications by Mark Weiser (bibliography)

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2004
 
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Lucca, Joyce, Jr., Nicholas C. Romano, Sharda, Ramesh and Weiser, Mark (2004): An Assessment of Elearning Technologies to Support Telecommunications Laboratory Learning Objectives. In: HICSS 2004 2004. .

2003
 
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Bordetsky, Alexander B. and Weiser, Mark (2003): Enterprise Systems: Architecture, Implementation and Infrastructure Management Minitrack Introduction. In: HICSS 2003 2003. p. 71.

2001
 
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Weiser, Mark (2001): Whatever happened to the next-generation Internet?. In Communications of the ACM, 44 (9) pp. 61-68.

1998
 
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Weiser, Mark (1998): The Future of Ubiquitous Computing on Campus. In Communications of the ACM, 41 (1) pp. 41-42.

1997
 
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Weiser, Mark (1997): Organizational Memory: Reducing Source-Sink Distance. In: HICSS 1997 1997. pp. 271-280.

1996
 
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Morrison, Joline and Weiser, Mark (1996): A Research Framework for Empirical Studies in Organizational Memory. In: HICSS 1996 1996. pp. 178-187.

1994
 
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Weiser, Mark (1994): Creating the Invisible Interface. In: Szekely, Pedro (ed.) Proceedings of the 7th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 02 - 04, 1994, Marina del Rey, California, United States. p. 1.

For thirty years, most interface design, and most computer design, has been headed down the path of the "dramatic" machine. Its highest ideal is to make a computer so exciting, so wonderful, so interesting, that we never want to be without it. A less-traveled path I call the "invisible"; its highest ideal is to make a computer so imbedded, so fitting, so natural, that we use it without even thinking about it. (I have also called this notion "Ubiquitous Computing.") I believe that in the next twenty years the second path will come to dominate. But this will not be easy; very little of our current systems infrastructure will survive. We have been building versions of the infrastructure-to-come at PARC for the past four years, in the form of inch-, foot-, and yard-sized computers we call Tabs, Pads, and Boards. In this talk I will describe the humanistic origins of the "invisible" ideal in post-modernist thought. I will then describe some of our prototypes, how they succeed and fail to be invisible, and what we have learned. I will illustrate new systems issues that user interface designers will face when creating invisibility. And I will indicate some new directions we are now exploring, including the famous "dangling string" display.

© All rights reserved Weiser and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiser, Mark (1994): The World is Not a Desktop. In Interactions, 1 (1) pp. 7-8.

What is the metaphor for the computer of the future? The intelligent agent? The television (multimedia)? The 3-D graphics world (virtual reality)? The Star Trek ubiquitous voice computer? The GUI desktop, honed and refined? The machine that magically grants our wishes? The right answer is "none of the above," because all of these concepts share a basic flaw -- they make the computer visible.

© All rights reserved Weiser and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Morrison, Joline and Weiser, Mark (1994): An Object-Oriented Model to Aid Organizational Decision Making and Learning. In: HICSS 1994 1994. pp. 755-764.

1993
 
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Weiser, Mark (1993): Some Computer Science Issues in Ubiquitous Computing. In Communications of the ACM, 36 (7) pp. 74-84.

1991
 
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Weiser, Mark (1991): The Computer for the 21st Century. In Scientific American, 265 (3) pp. 94-104.

 Cited in the following chapters:

Context-Aware Computing: Context-Awareness, Context-Aware User Interfaces, and Implicit Interaction: [/encyclopedia/context-aware_computing.html]

Industrial Design: [/encyclopedia/industrial_design.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapters:

Context-Aware Computing: Context-Awareness, Context-Aware User Interfaces, and Implicit Interaction: [/encyclopedia/context-aware_computing.html]

Industrial Design: [/encyclopedia/industrial_design.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
1988
 
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Pearson, Glenn and Weiser, Mark (1988): Exploratory Evaluation of a Planar Foot-Operated Cursor-Positioning Device. In: Soloway, Elliot, Frye, Douglas and Sheppard, Sylvia B. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 88 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 15-19, 1988, Washington, DC, USA. pp. 13-18.

The use of feet instead of hands to perform workstation cursor-positioning and related functions has been the subject of an on-going investigation. In the exploratory study reported here, a particular foot-operated device, the planar slide mole, was assessed against a mouse in a target-selection task. The study showed that novices can learn to select fairly small targets using a mole; for a target size of 1/8" square, the response time equaled that of the mouse when keyboard homing time was taken into account.

© All rights reserved Pearson and Weiser and/or ACM Press

 
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Callahan, Jack, Hopkins, Don, Weiser, Mark and Shneiderman, Ben (1988): An Empirical Comparison of Pie vs. Linear Menus. In: Soloway, Elliot, Frye, Douglas and Sheppard, Sylvia B. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 88 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 15-19, 1988, Washington, DC, USA. pp. 95-100.

Menus are largely formatted in a linear fashion listing items from the top to bottom of the screen or window. Pull down menus are a common example of this format. Bitmapped computer displays, however, allow greater freedom in the placement, font, and general presentation of menus. A pie menu is a format where the items are placed along the circumference of a circle at equal radial distances from the center. Pie menus gain over traditional linear menus by reducing target seek time, lowering error rates by fixing the distance factor and increasing the target size in Fitts' Law, minimizing the drift distance after target selection, and are, in general, subjectively equivalent to the linear style.

© All rights reserved Callahan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pearson, Glenn and Weiser, Mark (1988): Exploratory Evaluations of Two Versions of a Foot-Operated Cursor-Positioning Device in a Target-Selection Task. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 19 (3) pp. 70-75.

An investigation is on-going concerning the use of feet instead of hands to perform workstation cursor-positioning and related functions. In the exploratory studies reported here, two versions of a particular foot-operated device, the swing mole, were assessed against a mouse in a base-line target-selection task. The task had some of the elements involved in text editing, but did not directly include keyboard entry. The study showed that novices can learn to select fairly small targets using a mole, while revealing shortcomings in the current mole design and suggesting directions for redesign.

© All rights reserved Pearson and Weiser and/or ACM Press

1986
 
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Pearson, Glenn and Weiser, Mark (1986): Of Moles and Men: The Design of Foot Controls for Workstations. In: Mantei, Marilyn and Orbeton, Peter (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 86 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 13-17, 1986, Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 333-339.

Workstations require use of the hands both for text entry and for cursor-positioning or menu-selection. The physical arrangement does not allow these two tasks to be done concurrently. To remove this restriction, various alternative input devices have been investigated. This work focuses on the class of foot-operated computer input devices, called moles here. Appropriate topologies for foot movement are identified, and several designs for realising them are discussed.

© All rights reserved Pearson and Weiser and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiser, Mark and Lyle, Jim (1986): Experiments on Slicing-Based Debugging Aids. In: Soloway, Elliot and Iyengar, Sitharama (eds.) Empirical Studies of Programmers June 5-6 1986, 1986, Washington, DC. pp. 187-197.

Programming slicing is a method for reducing the amount of code looked at when debugging or understanding programs. Previous work concentrated on showing that programmers mentally slice during debugging. We present new work which concentrates on evaluating automatic tools for presenting slices to the debugging programmer. For one such tool, an online window-based editor/compiler/slicing system, we were unable to show that slicing helped. A second experiment, pencil and paper this time, presented programmers with dices of programs. A dice is a slice on incorrect variables from which slices on correct variables have been removed. Programmers using the dicing tool debugged their programs significantly faster than unaided programmers.

© All rights reserved Weiser and Lyle and/or Ablex Publishing

 
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Trigg, Randall H. and Weiser, Mark (1986): TEXTNET: A Network-Based Approach to Text Handling. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 4 (1) pp. 1-23.

Textnet is a new system for structuring text. The Textnet approach uses one uniform data structure to capture graphlike pools of text, as well as embedded hierarchical structures. By using a semantic network formalism of nodes connected by typed links, the relationship between neighboring pieces of text are made explicit. Also described is our partial implementation of the Textnet approach, which makes use of an object-oriented window/menu-driven user interface. Users peruse the network by moving among object menus or by reading text along a path through the network. In addition, critiquing, reader linking, searching, and jumping are easily accessible operations. Finally, the results of a short trial with users are presented.

© All rights reserved Trigg and Weiser and/or ACM Press

1983
 
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Weiser, Mark and Shertz, Joan (1983): Programming Problem Representation in Novice and Expert Programmers. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 19 (4) pp. 391-398.

The representation of computer programming problems in relation to the organization of programming knowledge is examined. An experiment previously done for physics knowledge is replicated to examine differences in the categories used for problem representation by novice and expert programmers. Results from sorting tasks show experts and novices begin their problem representations with specific different problem categories. Experts initially abstract an algorithm to solve a problem, whereas novices base their approach on a problem's literal features. A preliminary study of programming managers indicates an abstraction different from that used by programmers.

© All rights reserved Weiser and Shertz and/or Academic Press

1982
 
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Weiser, Mark (1982): Programmers Use Slices When Debugging. In Communications of the ACM, 25 (7) pp. 446-452.

 
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