Publication statistics

Pub. period:1992-2012
Pub. count:31
Number of co-authors:30



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Ellen Yi-Luen Do:11
Eric Schweikardt:4
Michael Philetus Weller:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mark D. Gross's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Sara Kiesler:59
Susan R. Fussell:46
Eric Paulos:42
 
 
 

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Mark D. Gross

 

Publications by Mark D. Gross (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Wu, Kuan-Ju, Gross, Mark D. and Baskinger, Mark (2012): Giffi: a gift for future inventors. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2012. pp. 335-336. Available online

Giffi is a computationally enhanced construction kit that enables children to build kinetic forms through purposeful play and discovery.

© All rights reserved Wu et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Yun, Ray and Gross, Mark D. (2011): RayMatic: ambient meter display with facial expression and gesture. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 341-346. Available online

We present an experimental thermostat display that moves beyond a conventional, number-based interface. It explores an approach to engaging and emotional human-computer interaction through facial expression and gesture. Using sensors and touch technology, an ordinary picture frame becomes an interactive meter and conveys environmental information as an ambient display.

© All rights reserved Yun and Gross and/or their publisher

 
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Kuznetsov, Stacey, Davis, George Noel, Paulos, Eric, Gross, Mark D. and Cheung, Jian Chiu (2011): Red balloon, green balloon, sensors in the sky. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 237-246. Available online

Spectacle computing is a novel strategy for vibrantly projecting information into the public sphere using expressive and tangible media. We demonstrate an example of this computing meme with large, glowing balloons that change color based on input from attached air quality sensors (exhaust, diesel, or volatile organic compounds). In two public installations (city street and public park) and a deployment with six everyday citizens, we invited stakeholders to playfully explore and actively participate in visualizing surrounding air quality. We also created a do-it-yourself (DIY) kit that includes a printed circuit board, electronic parts and instructions for building the air quality balloons. In a workshop, six non-expert users successfully assembled functional balloons, validating our technology as a DIY tool for public air quality visualization. Our deployments and workshop highlight play and spectacle as essential elements for public participation and activism. We outline design guidelines for future spectacle computing projects that engage stakeholders with environmental data and empower them to transform urban landscapes.

© All rights reserved Kuznetsov et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Kuznetsov, Stacey, Paulos, Eric and Gross, Mark D. (2010): WallBots: interactive wall-crawling robots in the hands of public artists and political activists. In: Proceedings of DIS10 Designing Interactive Systems 2010. pp. 208-217. Available online

Street art and political activism have a rich history of shaping urban landscapes. Our work explores the processes by which public artists and political activists contribute to public spaces, introducing opportunities for HCI researchers to engage with the people who shape the aesthetic feel of our cities. We present WallBots-autonomous, wall-crawling robots as a research probe for public expression across a wide range of surfaces and hard-to-reach places, including bus stops, whiteboards, streetpoles, trashcans, moving vehicles and building walls. We evaluate WallBots as a low-cost DIY authoring tool for public artists and activists. Our study of six individuals who extensively contribute to public spaces offers insights into the materials and practices behind grassroots public expression. We then leverage feedback from participants, among them a graffiti artist, light painter, political activists, and street musician, to evaluate interaction techniques for manipulating WallBots as a medium for public expression across a range of surfaces. Our findings expose a research space for technological interventions in the context of street art, and we conclude with design insights for magnetic kinetic systems as an approach for supporting engagement, expression and creativity in public spaces.

© All rights reserved Kuznetsov et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Scupelli, Peter G., Xiao, Yan, Fussell, Susan R., Kiesler, Sara and Gross, Mark D. (2010): Supporting coordination in surgical suites: physical aspects of common information spaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1777-1786. Available online

To accommodate frequent emergencies, interruptions, and delays, hospital staff continually make and coordinate changes to the surgery schedule. The technical and social aspects of coordination in surgical suites have been described by prior studies. This paper addresses an understudied aspect of coordination: the physical environment. Based on a field study of four surgical suites in two large academic centers, we show how the physical layout of hallways and rooms, and barriers and spaces around displays and key coordinators, support or fail to support the common information spaces used for coordination. We use the concept "information hotspots" to represent how physical places and their characteristics facilitate coordination. We developed design principles based on the concept of information hotspots that should guide architectural considerations for coordination in dynamic environments such as hospitals.

© All rights reserved Scupelli et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Wu, Kuan-Ju and Gross, Mark D. (2010): TOPAOKO: interactive construction kit. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3619-3624. Available online

If you have a laser cutter, you can build your own TOPAOKO. We describe work in progress on TOPAOKO, an interactive construction kit that encourages experimentation and play with pieces of a hardboard based, embedded circuit, kit. We describe each component of the kit and examples of constructions built with it.

© All rights reserved Wu and Gross and/or their publisher

 
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Smus, Boris and Gross, Mark D. (2010): Ubiquitous drums: a tangible, wearable musical interface. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4009-4014. Available online

Drummers and non-drummers alike can often be seen making percussive gestures on their chests, knees and feet. Ubiquitous Drums enhances this experience by providing musical feedback for these and other gestures. This paper describes the implementation and evolution of this tangible, wearable musical instrument.

© All rights reserved Smus and Gross and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Weller, Michael Philetus, Gross, Mark D. and Do, Ellen Yi-Luen (2009): Tangible sketching in 3D with posey. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3193-3198. Available online

Posey is a physical construction kit that is instrumented to capture assembly and configuration information and convey it to a host computer. We have used Posey to build applications that deploy a reconfigurable physical model as a tangible interface for various domains. We demonstrate these applications to support a case for computationally enhanced construction kits as a semi-general interaction modality.

© All rights reserved Weller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Huang, Yingdan, Gross, Mark D., Do, Ellen Yi-Luen and Eisenberg, Michael (2009): Easigami: a reconfigurable folded-sheet TUI. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 107-112. Available online

 
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Schweikardt, Eric, Elumeze, Nwanua, Eisenberg, Michael and Gross, Mark D. (2009): A tangible construction kit for exploring graph theory. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 373-376. Available online

 
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Weller, Michael Philetus, Do, Ellen Yi-Luen and Gross, Mark D. (2009): State machines are child's play: observing children ages 9 to 11 playing Escape Machine. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC09 Interaction Design and Children 2009. pp. 170-173. Available online

We developed Escape Machine, a puzzle game in which children control the behavior of characters in a maze by manipulating a tangible state machine built with Posey, our computationally-enhanced hub-and-strut construction kit. We observed children ages nine to eleven playing the game in several sessions. The qualitative results of this observation validate the promise of Posey and Escape Machine to engage children in manipulating algorithmic specifications for behavior.

© All rights reserved Weller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Saul, Greg, Xu, Cheng and Gross, Mark D. (2009): Interactive paper devices: end-user design & fabrication. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 205-212. Available online

We describe a family of interactive devices made from paper and simple electronics: Paper Robots, Paper Speakers and Paper Lamps. We developed construction techniques for these paper devices and the Paper Factory software with which novice users can create and build their own designs. The process and materials support DIY design and could be used with low-cost production and shipment from an external service.

© All rights reserved Saul et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Kim, Sunyoung, Paulos, Eric and Gross, Mark D. (2009): WearAir: expressive t-shirts for air quality sensing. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 295-296. Available online

We designed and prototyped WearAir, an expressive T-shirt to sense the wearer's surrounding air quality as indicated by the measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and publicly express those levels through visually expressive patterns. Although poor air quality has been shown to affect human health, our daily exposure to such pollutants has been inadequately captured and publicly shared. Our work is designed to accurately measure and publicly express the immediately local air quality. Obtaining information regarding air quality indirectly from others might help people to increase their awareness to air quality.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Weller, Michael Philetus, Do, Ellen Yi-Luen and Gross, Mark D. (2008): Escape machine: teaching computational thinking with a tangible state machine game. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC08 Interaction Design and Children 2008. pp. 282-289. Available online

We present a methodology for building objects-to-think-computationally-with and illustrate its application in developing our Escape Machine game. The input mechanism for this game is a tangible state machine built with Posey, our computationally enhanced construction kit. Through manipulating this state machine children create an algorithmic specification for the behavior of both the avatar and its enemies in an attempt to navigate a maze without being eaten. We outline several strategies for success at Escape Machine and discuss how it embeds an important computational thinking concept in interaction with a tangible device.

© All rights reserved Weller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weller, Michael Philetus, Do, Ellen Yi-Luen and Gross, Mark D. (2008): Posey: instrumenting a poseable hub and strut construction toy. In: Schmidt, Albrecht, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Hoven, Elise van den, Mazalek, Ali, Holleis, Paul and Villar, Nicolas (eds.) TEI 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 18-20, 2008, Bonn, Germany. pp. 39-46. Available online

 
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Schweikardt, Eric and Gross, Mark D. (2008): The robot is the program: interacting with roBlocks. In: Schmidt, Albrecht, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Hoven, Elise van den, Mazalek, Ali, Holleis, Paul and Villar, Nicolas (eds.) TEI 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 18-20, 2008, Bonn, Germany. pp. 167-168. Available online

2007
 
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Do, Ellen Yi-Luen and Gross, Mark D. (2007): Environments for creativity: a lab for making things. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2007, Washington DC, USA. pp. 27-36. Available online

We have, with our students, engaged in cross-disciplinary research in design. We describe parameters and principles that we have found helpful in organizing and conducting this kind of work. A variety of projects that have been developed in our group illustrate these parameters and principles. Our group focuses on making and we have come to see creativity as grounded in the ability to make things.

© All rights reserved Do and Gross and/or ACM Press

2006
 
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Schweikardt, Eric and Gross, Mark D. (2006): roBlocks: a robotic construction kit for mathematics and science education. In: Quek, Francis K. H., Yang, Jie, Massaro, Dominic W., Alwan, Abeer A. and Hazen, Timothy J. (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2006 November 2-4, 2006, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 72-75. Available online

 
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Johnson, Gabe, Gross, Mark D. and Do, Ellen Yi-Luen (2006): Flow selection: a time-based selection and operation technique for sketching tools. In: Celentano, Augusto (ed.) AVI 2006 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced visual interfaces May 23-26, 2006, Venezia, Italy. pp. 83-86. Available online

 
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Schweikardt, Eric and Gross, Mark D. (2006): roBlocks: a robotic construction kit for mathematics and science education. In: Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2006. pp. 72-75. Available online

We describe work in progress on roBlocks, a computational construction kit that encourages users to experiment and play with a collection of sensor, logic and actuator blocks, exposing them to a variety of advanced concepts including kinematics, feedback and distributed control. Its interface presents novice users with a simple, tangible set of robotic blocks, whereas advanced users work with software tools to analyze and rewrite the programs embedded in each block. Early results suggest that roBlocks may be an effective vehicle to expose young people to complex ideas in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

© All rights reserved Schweikardt and Gross and/or their publisher

2002
 
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Jung, Thomas, Gross, Mark D. and Do, Ellen Yi-Luen (2002): Annotating and sketching on 3D web models. In: Gil, Yolanda and Leake, David (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2002 January 13-16, 2002, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 95-102. Available online

This paper reports on our progress and findings in building a Web annotation system for non-immersive 3D virtual environments. Over the last two years, we developed and tested two systems for collaborating designers to comment on virtual 3D models. Our first system, Redliner [12] lets design team members browse and leave text annotations on surfaces in three-dimensional models. Experience with Redliner, including two user evaluations in different settings, led us to develop Space Pen [13], a second annotation system with improved interaction capabilities. It goes beyond the post-it note metaphor, allowing users to draw in and on the virtual environment.

© All rights reserved Jung et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Camarata, Ken, Do, Ellen Yi-Luen, Johnson, Brian R. and Gross, Mark D. (2002): Navigational blocks: navigating information space with tangible media. In: Gil, Yolanda and Leake, David (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2002 January 13-16, 2002, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 31-38. Available online

The Navigational Blocks project demonstrates a tangible user interface that facilitates retrieval of historical stories in a tourist spot. Orientation, movement, and relative positions of physical Blocks support visitor navigation and exploration in a virtual gallery. The Navigational Blocks system provides a physical embodiment of digital information through tactile manipulation and haptic feedback. The simple cubic form of the Blocks is easy to understand and therefore easy to use to manipulate complex digital information. Electromagnets embedded in the Blocks and wireless communication encourage users to quickly rearrange the Blocks to form different database queries.

© All rights reserved Camarata et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Gross, Mark D. and Do, Ellen Yi-Luen (2000): Drawing on the Back of an Envelope: a framework for interacting with application programs by freehand drawing. In Computers & Graphics, 24 (6) pp. 835-849. Available online

1998
 
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Yamamoto, Yasuhiro, Takada, Shingo, Gross, Mark D. and Nakakoji, Kumiyo (1998): Representational Talkback: An Approach to Support Writing as Design. In: Third Asian Pacific Computer and Human Interaction July 15-17, 1998, Kangawa, Japan. pp. 125-131. Available online

1997
 
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Kuczun, Kyle S. and Gross, Mark D. (1997): Network Design: Tasks & Tools. In: Proceedings of DIS97: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 1997. pp. 215-222. Available online

Designers often draw to produce artifacts for thinking and communicating about their designs. These artifacts (drawings) provide the designer with various levels of abstraction to conceptually frame the design problem. Because network designers traditionally make drawings throughout the design process, we propose that the computational environment should facilitate and capitalize on this activity. We describe a suite of computer based network design tools that employ freehand drawing as an interface.

© All rights reserved Kuczun and Gross and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Gross, Mark D. and Do, Ellen Yi-Luen (1996): Ambiguous Intentions: A Paper-Like Interface for Creative Design. In: Kurlander, David, Brown, Marc and Rao, Ramana (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 1996, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 183-192. Available online

Interfaces for conceptual and creative design should recognize and interpret drawings. They should also capture users' intended ambiguity, vagueness, and imprecision and convey these qualities visually and through interactive behavior. Freehand drawing can provide this information and it is a natural input mode for design. We describe a pen-based interface that acquires information about ambiguity and precision from freehand input, represents it internally, and echoes it to users visually and through constraint based edit behavior.

© All rights reserved Gross and Do and/or ACM Press

 
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Citrin, Wayne and Gross, Mark D. (1996): Distributed architectures for pen-based input and diagram recognition. In: Catarci, Tiziana, Costabile, Maria Francesca, Levialdi, Stefano and Santucci, Giuseppe (eds.) AVI 1996 - Proceedings of the workshop on Advanced visual interfaces May 27-29, 1996, Gubbio, Italy. pp. 132-140. Available online

 
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Citrin, Wayne and Gross, Mark D. (1996): PDA-based graphical interchange for field service and repair workers. In Computers & Graphics, 20 (5) pp. 641-649. Available online

1994
 
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Gross, Mark D. (1994): Stretch-A-Sketch: a Dynamic Diagrammer. In: VL 1994 1994. pp. 232-238.

 
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Gross, Mark D. (1994): Recognizing and Interpreting Diagrams in Design. In: Advanced Visual Interfaces 1994 1994. pp. 88-94. Available online

1992
 
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Gross, Mark D. (1992): Graphical Constraints in CoDraw. In: Proceedings of the 1992 IEEE Workshop on Visual Languages September 15-18, 1992, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 81-87.

 
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