Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:35
Number of co-authors:45



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Peter Wright:8
Andrew Monk:6
Peter C. Wright:5

 

 

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Mark Blythe's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gilbert Cockton:72
Andrew Monk:68
Alan Blackwell:58
 
 
 
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Mark Blythe

Picture of Mark Blythe.
Has also published under the name of:
"Mark A. Blythe"

Personal Homepage:
markblythe.me.uk/MarkBlythe/Home.html


Mark is Professor of Interdisciplinary Design at Northumbria University. He is a design ethnographer working in the field of Human Computer Interaction. His research interests include the ageing population, looming ecological catastrophe and the messed up world we're in. Recent projects include collaborations with Goldsmiths' Interaction Research Studio which were based at a residential care home and a nunnery. He is currently working on a project on banking for the older old. His other work draws on critical theory and YouTube to consider the impacts of new and emerging technologies.

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Publications by Mark Blythe (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Vines, John, Dunphy, Paul, Blythe, Mark, Lindsay, Stephen, Monk, Andrew and Olivier, Patrick (2012): The joy of cheques: trust, paper and eighty somethings. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 147-156

A cheque is a paper document that orders the transfer of money between bank accounts. Whilst an eighty-year-old in the UK is predicted on average to live at least another ten years, cheques may not. Despite many older peoples extensive use of cheques, UK banks are eager to abolish them and design electronic alternatives that are less costly to process and less vulnerable to fraud. This paper reports on two qualitative studies that explored the banking experiences of 23 people over eighty years old. Cheques support financial collaboration with others in ways that digital payment systems do not. We argue that whilst it might be possible to improve the design of digital payment systems to better support financial collaboration, the case for retaining and enhancing cheques is stronger. Rather than replace cheques, we must design ways of making them less costly to process and better linked to electronic payment methods.

© All rights reserved Vines et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Briggs, Pam, Blythe, Mark, Vines, John, Lindsay, Stephen, Dunphy, Paul, Nicholson, James, Green, David, Kitson, Jim, Monk, Andrew and Olivier, Patrick (2012): Invisible design: exploring insights and ideas through ambiguous film scenarios. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 534-543

Invisible Design is a technique for generating insights and ideas with workshop participants in the early stages of concept development. It involves the creation of ambiguous films in which characters discuss a technology that is not directly shown. The technique builds on previous work in HCI on scenarios, persona, theatre, film and ambiguity. The Invisible Design approach is illustrated with three examples from unrelated projects; Biometric Daemon, Panini and Smart Money. The paper presents a qualitative analysis of data from a series of workshops where these Invisible Designs were discussed. The analysis outlines responses to the films in terms of; existing problems, concerns with imagined technologies and design speculation. It is argued that Invisible Design can help to create a space for critical and creative dialogue during participatory concept development.

© All rights reserved Briggs et al. and/or ACM Press

2011

Blythe, Mark (2011). Commentary on 'User Experience and Experience Design' by Marc Hassenzahl

Blythe, Mark (2013): Critical Theory. In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/critical_theory.html

 
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Gaver, William, Boucher, Andy, Bowers, John, Blythe, Mark, Jarvis, Nadine, Cameron, David, Kerridge, Tobie, Wilkie, Alex, Phillips, Robert and Wright, Peter (2011): The photostroller: supporting diverse care home residents in engaging with the world. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1757-1766

The Photostroller is a device designed for use by residents of a care home for older people. It shows a continuous slideshow of photographs retrieved from the Flickr image website using a set of six predefined categories modified by a tuneable degree of 'semantic drift'. In this paper, we describe the design process that led to the Photostroller, and summarise observations made during a deployment in the care home that has lasted over two months at the time of writing. We suggest that the Photostroller balances constraint with openness, and control with drift, to provide an effective resource for the ludic engagement of a diverse group of older people with each other and the world outside their home.

© All rights reserved Gaver et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Blythe, Mark, Petrie, Helen and Clark, John A. (2011): F for fake: four studies on how we fall for phish. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3469-3478

This paper reports findings from a multi-method set of four studies that investigate why we continue to fall for phish. Current security advice suggests poor spelling and grammar in emails can be signs of phish. But a content analysis of a phishing archive indicates that many such emails contain no obvious spelling or grammar mistakes and often use convincing logos and letterheads. An online survey of 224 people finds that although phish are detected approximately 80% of the time, those with logos are significantly harder to detect. A qualitative interview study was undertaken to better understand the strategies used to identify phish. Blind users were selected because it was thought they may be more vulnerable to phishing attacks, however they demonstrated robust strategies for identifying phish based on careful reading of emails. Finally an analysis was undertaken of phish as a literary form. This identifies the main literary device employed as pastiche and draws on critical theory to consider why security based pastiche may be currently very persuasive.

© All rights reserved Blythe et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Usability Evaluation: [/encyclopedia/usability_evaluation.html]


 
2010
 
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Blythe, Mark and Cairns, Paul (2010): Tenori-on stage: YouTube as performance space. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 72-81.

This paper reports findings from four related studies of the "Tenori-on" as it appears on YouTube in order to consider Web 2.0 as a performance space. A quantitative analysis of returns for "Tenori-on" attempts to model how posts achieve and maintain popularity. This analysis suggests sustained posting and engagement amongst users rather than initial product launch enthusiasm. A content analysis of the videos returned demonstrates a very different response to the launch of other technologies like the iPhone 3G. A grounded theory explores comments to the most viewed video returned which was a post by the artist Little Boots. A range of comments indicate virtual applause and suggest that YouTube has been appropriated here as a space for performance. Finally perspectives from critical theory are drawn on to consider the meanings of the Tenori-on in this user generated context and the ways users creatively resist the most obvious affordances of the device.

© All rights reserved Blythe and Cairns and/or their publisher

 
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Foster, Derek, Lawson, Shaun, Blythe, Mark and Cairns, Paul (2010): Wattsup?: motivating reductions in domestic energy consumption using social networks. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 178-187.

This paper reports on the design, deployment and evaluation of "Wattsup", an innovative application which displays live autonomously logged data from the Wattson energy monitor, allowing users to compare domestic energy consumption on Facebook. Discussions and sketches from a workshop with Facebook users were used to develop a final design implemented using the Facebook API. Wattson energy monitors and the Wattsup app were deployed and trialled in eight homes over an eighteen day period in two conditions. In the first condition participants could only access their personal energy data, whilst in the second they could access each others' data to make comparisons. A significant reduction in energy was observed in the socially enabled condition. Comments on discussion boards and semi-structured interviews with the participants indicated that the element of competition helped motivate energy savings. The paper argues that socially-mediated banter and competition made for a more enjoyable user experience.

© All rights reserved Foster et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Blythe, Mark, Wright, Peter, Bowers, John, Boucher, Andy, Jarvis, Nadine, Reynolds, Phil and Gaver, William W. (2010): Age and experience: ludic engagement in a residential care setting. In: Proceedings of DIS10 Designing Interactive Systems 2010. pp. 161-170.

The "older old" (people over eighty) are a largely invisible group for those not directly involved in their lives; this project explores the ways that technology might strengthen links between different generations. This paper describes findings from a two-year study of a residential care home and develops the notion of cross-generational engagement through ludic systems which encourage curiosity and playfulness. It outlines innovative ways of engaging the older old through "digital curios" such as Bloom, the Tenori On and Google Earth. The use of these curios was supplemented with portraiture by three local artists, nine school children and the field researcher. The paper describes four technological interventions: "video window", "projected portraiture", "blank canvas", and "soundscape radio". These interventions attempt to reposition "off the shelf technologies to provide a space for cross-generational engagement The notion of inter-passivity (the obverse of interaction) is explored in relation to each intervention.

© All rights reserved Blythe et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Gaver, William, Blythe, Mark, Boucher, Andy, Jarvis, Nadine, Bowers, John and Wright, Peter (2010): The prayer companion: openness and specificity, materiality and spirituality. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2055-2064.

In this paper we describe the Prayer Companion, a device we developed as a resource for the spiritual activity of a group of cloistered nuns. The device displays a stream of information sourced from RSS news feeds and social networking sites to suggest possible topics for prayers. The nuns have engaged with the device enthusiastically over the first ten months of an ongoing deployment, and, notwithstanding some initial irritation with the balance of content, report that it plays a significant and continuing role in their prayer life. We discuss how we balanced specificity in the design with a degree of openness for interpretation to create a resource that the nuns could both understand and appropriate, describe the importance of materiality to the device's successful adoption, consider its implications as a design for older people, and reflect on the example it provides of how computation may serve spirituality.

© All rights reserved Gaver et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Cockton, Gilbert, Bardzell, Shaowen, Blythe, Mark and Bardzell, Jeffrey (2010): Can we all stand under our umbrella: the arts and design research in HCI. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3163-3166.

The Arts (i.e., all liberal, cultural, literary, visual and performing arts disciplines) are becoming more prominent at CHI. This SIG will take stock of what they can contribute, and how and why, and what the CHI community needs to do to more fully embrace The Arts to advance the leading edge of design research.

© All rights reserved Cockton et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Foster, Derek, Blythe, Mark, Cairns, Paul and Lawson, Shaun (2010): Competitive carbon counting: can social networking sites make saving energy more enjoyable?. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4039-4044.

This paper reports on the design, deployment and initial evaluation of "Wattsup", an innovative Facebook application which displays live data from a commercial off-the-shelf energy monitor. The Wattsup application was deployed and trialled in eight homes over an eighteen day period in two conditions -- personal energy data viewable and friend's energy data viewable. A significant reduction in energy was observed in the socially enabled condition. The paper argues that socially-mediated discussion and competition made for a more enjoyable user experience.

© All rights reserved Foster et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Blythe, Mark, McCarthy, John, Light, Ann, Bardzell, Shaowen, Wright, Peter, Bardzell, Jeffrey and Blackwell, Alan (2010): Critical dialogue: interaction, experience and cultural theory. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4521-4524.

Although topics such as fun, enjoyment, aesthetics, and experience are relatively new in HCI, long traditions of scholarship in the humanities and social sciences have examined them. Some have already been expressed in the appropriation of conceptualizations of experience in HCI research and practice. There is also a small but fast growing body of work in HCI seeking to approach these topics from the perspective of cultural and critical theory. In the history of ideas, experience and critical theory have not always made good bedfellows, sometimes complementing each other, sometimes resisting each other. This workshop will explore the ways in which HCI can benefit from a constructive dialogue between critical theory and experience in questions of design and evaluation.

© All rights reserved Blythe et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Blythe, Mark and Cairns, Paul (2009): Critical methods and user generated content: the iPhone on YouTube. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1467-1476.

Sites like YouTube offer vast sources of data for studies of human computer interaction. However, they also present a number of methodological challenges. This paper offers an example study of the initial reception of the iPhone 3G through YouTube. It begins with a quantitative account of the overall shape of the most frequently viewed returns for an iPhone 3G" search. A content analysis of the first hundred videos then explores the returns categorized by genre. Comments on the most popular video "Will It Blend" are analysed using grounded theory. It is argued that social science methods are not sufficient for a rich understanding of such material. The paper concludes with an analysis of "Will it Blend" that draws on cultural and critical theory. It is argued that a multi-methodological approach is necessary to exploit such data and also to address the challenges of next generation Human Computer Interaction (HCI).

© All rights reserved Blythe and Cairns and/or ACM Press

 
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Blythe, Mark, Hassenzahl, Marc and Law, Effie (2009): Now with Added Experience?. In New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, 15 (2) pp. 119-128.

 
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Blythe, Mark and Dearden, Andy (2009): Representing older people: towards meaningful images of the user in design scenarios. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 8 (1) pp. 21-32.

Designing for older people requires the consideration of a range of design problems, which may be related to difficult and sometimes highly personal matters. Issues such as fear, loneliness, dependency, and physical decline may be hard to observe or discuss in interviews. Pastiche scenarios and pastiche personae are techniques that employ characters to create a space for the discussion of new technological developments and user experience. This paper argues that the use of fictional characters can help to overcome restrictive notions of older people by disrupting designers' prior assumptions. In this paper, we reflect on our experiences using pastiche techniques in two separate technology design projects that sought to address the needs of older people. In the first pastiche scenarios were developed by the designers of the system and used as discussion documents with users. In the second pastiche personae were used by groups of users themselves to generate scenarios which were scribed for later use by the design team. We explore how the use of fictional characters and settings can generate new ideas and undercut the potential in scenarios, for weak characterisation of "the user" to permit scenario writers to fit characters to technology rather than vice versa. To assist in future development of pastiche techniques in designing for older people, we provide an array of fictional older characters drawn from literary and popular culture.

© All rights reserved Blythe and Dearden and/or Springer Verlag

2008
 
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Blythe, Mark and Wright, Peter (2008): Technology scruples: why intimidation will not save the recording industry and how enchantment might. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 12 (5) pp. 411-420.

 
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Wright, Peter C., Blythe, Mark and McCarthy, John C. (2008): Editorial. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 12 (5) pp. 343-346.

 
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Blythe, Mark, Robinson, John and Frohlich, David (2008): Interaction design and the critics: what to make of the "weegie. In: Proceedings of the Fifth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 53-62.

This paper describes the development and evaluation of "weegie" an audio-photography desk featuring sounds and images inspired by the Govan area of Glasgow. It was intended to be an interactive artwork that would challenge negative preconceptions about the area. The paper describes two techniques used to consider the extent to which the piece achieved these aims. The first technique is the "personal meaning map" and taken from museum studies. The second is cultural critique drawn from the arts. Building on Gaver's [24] strategy of using cultural commentators for 'polyphonic' assessment it considers the extent to which perspectives drawn from the humanities and the arts can be useful in evaluating design. It argues that a more rigorous understanding of critical theory is necessary to the development of interaction design criticism.

© All rights reserved Blythe et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Blythe, Mark, Bardzell, Jeffrey, Bardzell, Shaowen and Blackwell, Alan (2008): Critical Issues in Interaction Design. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 183-184.

Computing technology is now so entwined with everyday life that enquiries into human computer interaction (HCI) are also studies of society and culture Cultural and Critical theory is then increasingly relevant to studies of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). It is both timely and important to develop understandings of the strengths and limitations of the various perspectives available within the fractious traditions of cultural and critical theory. This workshop will consider the challenges of making such theory relevant and accessible to HCI and interaction design.

© All rights reserved Blythe et al. and/or their publisher

2006
 
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Blythe, Mark and Wright, Peter C. (2006): Pastiche scenarios: Fiction as a resource for user centred design. In Interacting with Computers, 18 (5) pp. 1139-1164.

Pastiche scenarios draw on fiction as a resource to explore the interior 'felt-life' aspects of user experience and the complex social and cultural issues raised by technological innovations. This paper sets out an approach for their use, outlining techniques for the location of source material and presenting three case studies of pastiche scenario use. The first case study is an evaluation of the Apple iPod that explores the socio-cultural meanings of the technology. The second case study focuses on the participatory design of Net Neighbours, an online shopping system where volunteers shop as intermediaries for older people who do not have access to computers. The third is an in depth consideration of a conceptual design, the 'cambadge' a wearable lightweight web cam which, upon activation broadcasts to police or public websites intended to reduce older people's fear of crime. This design concept is explored in depth in pastiche scenarios of the Miss Marple stories, A Clockwork Orange and Nineteen Eighty-four that reflect on how the device might be experienced not only by users but also by those it is used against. It is argued that pastiche scenarios are a useful complementary method for designers to reason about user experience as well as the broad social and cultural impacts of new technologies.

© All rights reserved Blythe and Wright and/or Elsevier Science

 Cited in the following chapter:

Personas: [/encyclopedia/personas.html]


 
2005
 
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Blythe, Mark and Monk, Andrew (2005): Net neighbours: adapting HCI methods to cross the digital divide. In Interacting with Computers, 17 (1) pp. 35-56.

This paper describes the development of Net Neighbours, an online shopping scheme that widens internet access to older people via volunteer telephone intermediaries. It outlines the processes of: problem identification, designing the telephone interaction, the financial model and the interface for the volunteer. It describes the application and adaptation of human computer interaction (HCI) techniques to address the needs of the local charity that co-developed the scheme. The paper begins by reporting the ethnographic work that led to the scheme; it then describes the pilot study conducted with Age Concern, York. It maps the various possible configurations for the scheme in a series of financial models expressed in tree diagrams and goes on to describe the use of pastiche scenarios in developing designs. Pastiche scenarios draw on fiction as a resource to explore, in an engaging manner, the social issues raised by technological innovations; the paper presents extracts from three such scenarios that were used to reason about dependability issues with Age Concern staff. The scheme is ongoing and plans are currently being made to extend it by recruiting university staff and other office workers as volunteer intermediaries. It is hoped that the scheme will become widely available across the city and in other locations around the UK. It is argued that volunteer telephone intermediaries can bridge digital divides and make Internet services accessible to those excluded either by age, disability or lack of resources. The development of the scheme is a case study in the ways that HCI techniques can be adopted and adapted in order to design for civil society.

© All rights reserved Blythe and Monk and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Blythe, Mark, Monk, Andrew and Doughty, Kevin (2005): Socially dependable design: The challenge of ageing populations for HCI. In Interacting with Computers, 17 (6) pp. 672-689.

This paper considers the needs of an ageing population and the implications for Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research. The discussion is structured around findings from interviews with medical and care professionals and older people. Various technologies are being successfully used to monitor for falls and other emergencies, and also to assess and manage risk. The design of this technology is currently driven by a medical model of client needs and takes little account of the social context of the home. The design challenges for HCI are to make this technology attractive, provide privacy, allow informed choice and reduce rather than increase the isolation currently felt by many older people. It is argued that the ageing population presents a fundamental challenge to HCI in the need for socially dependable systems. Socially dependable systems take account of social context, the need for sociability and are accessible to all who need them.

© All rights reserved Blythe et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Blythe, Mark, Reed, Darren J., Wright, Peter C. and Monk, Andrew F. (2005): Critical perspectives on dependability: an older person's experience of assistive technology. In: Bertelsen, Olav W., Bouvin, Niels Olof, Krogh, Peter Gall and Kyng, Morten (eds.) Proceedings of the 4th Decennial Conference on Critical Computing 2005 August 20-24, 2005, Aarhus, Denmark. pp. 169-172.

 
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Wright, Peter C., Blythe, Mark and McCarthy, John C. (2005): User Experience and the Idea of Design in HCI. In: Gilroy, Stephen W. and Harrison, Michael D. (eds.) DSV-IS 2005 - Interactive Systems, Design, Specification, and Verification, 12th International Workshop July 13-15, 2005, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. pp. 1-14.

2004
 
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Monk, Andrew, Carroll, Jenni, Parker, Sarah and Blythe, Mark (2004): Why are mobile phones annoying?. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 23 (1) pp. 33-41.

Sixty four members of the public were exposed to the same staged conversation either while waiting in a bus station or travelling on a train. Half of the conversations were by mobile phone, so that only one end of the conversation was heard, and half were co present face-to-face conversations. The volume of the conversations was controlled at one of two levels: the actors' usual speech level and exaggeratedly loud. Following exposure to the conversation participants were approached and asked to give verbal ratings on six scales. Analysis of variance showed that mobile phone conversations were significantly more noticeable and annoying than face-to-face conversations at the same volume when the content of the conversation is controlled. Indeed this effect of medium was as large as the effect of loudness. Various explanations of this effect are explored, with their practical implications.

© All rights reserved Monk et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Blythe, Mark, Hassenzahl, Marc and Wright, Peter (2004): Introduction. In Interactions, 11 (5) pp. 36-37.

 
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Blythe, Mark (2004): Interview with Patrick Jordan. In Interactions, 11 (5) pp. 40-41.

 
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Blythe, Mark and Hassenzahl, Marc (2004): Interview with Don Norman. In Interactions, 11 (5) pp. 43-46.

 
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Blythe, Mark (2004): Pastiche scenarios. In Interactions, 11 (5) pp. 51-53.

 
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Blythe, Mark and Jones, Mark (2004): Human computer (sexual) interactions. In Interactions, 11 (5) pp. 75-76.

 
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Blythe, Mark, Wright, Peter C. and Monk, Andrew F. (2004): Little brother: could and should wearable computing technologies be applied to reducing older people's fear of crime?. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (6) pp. 402-415.

2003
 
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Blythe, Mark, Overbeeke, Kees, Monk, Andrew F. and Wright, Peter (2003): Funology: From Usability to Enjoyment (XIII-XIX). Dordrecht, Netherlands, Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Blythe, Mark and Wright, Peter (2003): Introduction: From usability to enjoyment. In: Blythe, Mark, Overbeeke, Kees, Monk, Andrew F. and Wright, Peter (eds.). "Funology: From Usability to Enjoyment (XIII-XIX)". Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers

 Cited in the following chapter:

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
2002
 
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Blythe, Mark and Monk, Andrew (2002): Notes towards an ethnography of domestic technology. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 277-281.

This paper reports the key findings of an ethnographic study of domestic technology in the home. The issues addressed include: the gendered division of domestic labour and gendered product design; the privatisation of domestic space through entertainment technologies; and the necessity of making mundane housework more enjoyable. The paper briefly describes the technology biography procedure that was used to gather data, outlines key design implications, and presents illustrative product suggestions, which are intended to inspire or provoke designers.

© All rights reserved Blythe and Monk and/or ACM Press

 
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/mark_blythe.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:35
Number of co-authors:45



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Peter Wright:8
Andrew Monk:6
Peter C. Wright:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mark Blythe's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gilbert Cockton:72
Andrew Monk:68
Alan Blackwell:58
 
 
 
Jul 25

For us, our most important stakeholder is not our stockholders, it is our customers. We’re in business to serve the needs and desires of our core customer base

-- John Mackey

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!