Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-1994
Pub. count:8
Number of co-authors:11



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

John Vlissides:2
Steven H. Tang:2
Andrew Palay:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mark A. Linton's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Brad A. Myers:154
Gurminder Singh:19
Jarrett Rosenberg:7
 
 
 
Jul 28

A user will find any interface design intuitive...with enough practice.

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Mark A. Linton

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Publications by Mark A. Linton (bibliography)

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1994
 
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Tang, Steven H. and Linton, Mark A. (1994): Blending Structured Graphics and Layout. In: Szekely, Pedro (ed.) Proceedings of the 7th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 02 - 04, 1994, Marina del Rey, California, United States. pp. 167-174.

Conventional windowing environments provide separate classes of objects for user interface components, or "widgets," and graphical objects. Widgets negotiate layout and can be resided as rectangles, while graphics may be shared, transformed, transparent, and overlaid. This presents a major obstacle to applications like user interface builders and compound document editors where the manipulated objects need to behave both like graphics and widgets. Fresco[1] blends graphics and widgets into a single class of objects. We have an implementation of Fresco and an editor called Fdraw that allows graphical objects to be composed like widgets, and widgets to be transformed and shared like graphics. Performance measurements of Fdraw show that sharing reduces memory usage without slowing down redisplay.

© All rights reserved Tang and Linton and/or ACM Press

1993
 
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Tang, Steven H. and Linton, Mark A. (1993): Pacers: Time-Elastic Objects. In: Hudson, Scott E., Pausch, Randy, Zanden, Brad Vander and Foley, James D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology 1993, Atlanta, Georgia, United States. pp. 35-43.

Current time-based presentation systems are rigid in that they assume the running time of all components of a presentation is constant. Furthermore, most systems offer little or no support for dynamically adapting the presentation quality to the (lack of) available system resources. In this paper, we introduce an object called a Pacer that is "time-elastic" in that it can adjust the quality of its presentation according to the amount of time available. We have implemented a direct manipulation graphical interface using pacers that can automatically degrade presentation quality in a controlled fashion depending on the user's input rate and the speed of the rendering system.

© All rights reserved Tang and Linton and/or ACM Press

 
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Singh, Gurminder, Linton, Mark A., Myers, Brad A. and Szczur, Marti (1993): From Research Prototypes to Usable, Useful Systems: Lessons Learned in the Trenches. In: Hudson, Scott E., Pausch, Randy, Zanden, Brad Vander and Foley, James D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology 1993, Atlanta, Georgia, United States. pp. 139-143.

A significant amount of innovation from research labs and universities is wasted; it is never applied in systems that the actual users can or want to use. The process of going from a novel concept to a usable, useful system is poorly understood by most researchers. The purpose of this panel is to address how research done in research labs and universities can be converted into systems that the end users would use. Each of the panelists has built at least one substantial system which is currently being used by a large community of real users (other than the team that built the system). Based on their experience, they will make recommendations that, if followed early enough in the project, would make the conversion to usable systems faster and easier.

© All rights reserved Singh et al. and/or ACM Press

1990
 
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Calder, Paul and Linton, Mark A. (1990): Glyphs: Flyweight Objects for User Interfaces. In: Hudson, Scott E. (ed.) Proceedings of the 3rd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology October 03 - 05, 1990, Snowbird, Utah, United States. pp. 92-101.

Current user interface toolkits provide components that are complex and expensive. Programmers cannot use these components for many kinds of application data because the resulting implementation would be awkward and inefficient. We have defined a set of small, simple components, called glyphs, that programmers can use in large numbers to build user interfaces. To show that glyphs are simple and efficient, we have implemented a WYSIWYG document editor. The editor's performance is comparable to that of similar editors built with current tools, but its implementation is much simpler. We used the editor to create and print this paper.

© All rights reserved Calder and and/or ACM Press

 
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Rosenberg, Jarrett, Asente, Paul, Linton, Mark A. and Palay, Andrew (1990): X Toolkits: the Lessons Learned. In: Hudson, Scott E. (ed.) Proceedings of the 3rd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology October 03 - 05, 1990, Snowbird, Utah, United States. pp. 108-111.

 
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Vlissides, John and Linton, Mark A. (1990): Unidraw: A Framework for Building Domain-Specific Graphical Editors. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 8 (3) pp. 237-268.

Unidraw is a framework for creating graphical editors in domains such as technical and artistic drawing, music composition, and circuit design. The Unidraw architecture simplifies the construction of these editors by providing programming abstractions that are common across domains. Unidraw defines four basic abstractions: components encapsulate the appearance and behavior of objects, tools support direct manipulation of components, commands define operations on components, and external representations define the mapping between components and the file format generated by the editor. Unidraw also supports multiple views, graphical connectivity, and dataflow between components. This paper describes the Unidraw design, implementation issues, and three experimental domain-specific editors we have developed with Unidraw: a drawing editor, a user interface builder, and a schematic capture system. Our results indicate a substantial reduction in implementation time and effort compared with existing tools.

© All rights reserved Vlissides and and/or ACM Press

1989
 
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Vlissides, John and Linton, Mark A. (1989): Unidraw: A Framework for Building Domain-Specific Graphical Editors. In: Sibert, John L. (ed.) Proceedings of the 2nd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology November 13 - 15, 1989, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. pp. 158-167.

Unidraw is a framework for creating object-oriented graphical editors in domains such as technical and artistic drawing, music composition, and CAD. The Unidraw architecture simplifies the construction of these editors by providing programming abstractions that are common across domains. Unidraw defines four basic abstractions: components encapsulate the appearance and behavior of objects, tools support direct manipulation of components, commands define operations on components, and external representations define the mapping between components and a file or database. Unidraw also supports multiple views, graphical connectivity, and dataflow between components. This paper presents Unidraw and three prototype domain-specific editors we have developed with it: a schematic capture system, a user interface builder, and a drawing editor. Experience indicates a substantial reduction in implementation time and effort compared with existing tools.

© All rights reserved Vlissides and and/or ACM Press

 
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Linton, Mark A., Vlissides, John M. and Calder, Paul R. (1989): Composing User Interfaces with InterViews. In IEEE Computer, 22 (2) pp. 8-22.

 
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Changes to this page (author)

01 Jun 2009: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/mark_a__linton.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-1994
Pub. count:8
Number of co-authors:11



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

John Vlissides:2
Steven H. Tang:2
Andrew Palay:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mark A. Linton's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Brad A. Myers:154
Gurminder Singh:19
Jarrett Rosenberg:7
 
 
 
Jul 28

A user will find any interface design intuitive...with enough practice.

-- Popular computer one-liner

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!