Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2014
Pub. count:25
Number of co-authors:54



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Grigore C. Burdea:3
Ivan Marsic:3
Suling Zhang:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Marilyn M. Tremaine's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Wendy E. Mackay:61
Murray Turoff:50
Carla Simone:31
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Emotional Design: How to make products people will love
Starts TODAY LAST CALL!
go to course
UI Design Patterns for Successful Software
87% booked. Starts in 8 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Marilyn M. Tremaine

Picture of Marilyn M. Tremaine.
Update pic
Has also published under the name of:
"Marilyn Tremaine"

Dr. Marilyn Tremaine is a Research Professor at Rutgers University where she has joint appointments in the College of Communication and Information and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Prior to Rutgers University, she was a Professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Toronto and prior to that, a Professor in the University of Michigan Business School. Her practical experience includes being Vice President of Product Development for three software startup companies and a Senior Research Scientist at the EDS Center for Applied Research. Dr. Tremaine is particularly known for her work on collaborative software. Dr. Tremaine co-founded ACM-SIGCHI and has served as SIGCHI's Vice-President of Communications, Vice-President of Finance, Vice-President of Conference Planning and most recently, President of SIGCHI. She chaired the CHI 86 Conference on Human Factors in Computing, the CSCW 92 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, the ASSETS 2000 Conference on Assistive Technology and the CUU 2003 Conference on Universal Usability. Dr. Tremaine has served on six technical journal editorial boards and is the recipient of two University teaching awards. She has given multiple tutorials at the CHI and CSCW conferences and has been an instructor of short courses in User Experience Design at the University of Michigan for many years. Dr. Tremaine is also the recipient of the ACM SIGCHI lifetime service award, the CHCSS Lifetime Career Award, the UPA Lifetime Career Award, and an Apple Design award.

 

Publications by Marilyn M. Tremaine (bibliography)

 what's this?
2014

Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2014). Commentary on 'Contextual Design' by Karen Holtzblatt and Hugh R. Beyer

2010
 
Edit | Del

Nikolova, Sonya, Ma, Xiaojuan, Tremaine, Marilyn M. and Cook, Perry (2010): Vocabulary navigation made easier. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2010. pp. 361-364. Available online

It is challenging to search a dictionary consisting of thousands of entries in order to select appropriate words for building written communication. This is true both for people trying to communicate in a foreign language who have not developed a full vocabulary, for school children learning to write, for authors who wish to be more precise and expressive, and especially for people with lexical access disorders. We make vocabulary navigation and word finding easier by augmenting a basic vocabulary with links between words based on human judgments of semantic similarity. In this paper, we report the results from a user study evaluating how our system named ViVA performs compared to a widely used assistive vocabulary in which words are organized hierarchically into common categories.

© All rights reserved Nikolova et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Nikolova, Sonya, Tremaine, Marilyn M. and Cook, Perry R. (2010): Click on bake to get cookies: guiding word-finding with semantic associations. In: Twelfth Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2010. pp. 155-162. Available online

It is challenging to navigate a dictionary consisting of thousands of entries in order to select appropriate words for building communication. This is particularly true for people with lexical access disorders like those present in aphasia. We make vocabulary navigation and word-finding easier by building a vocabulary network where links between words reflect human judgments of semantic relatedness. We report the results from a user study with people with aphasia that evaluated how our system (called ViVA) performs compared to a widely used vocabulary access system in which words are organized hierarchically into common categories and subcategories. The results indicate that word retrieval is significantly better with ViVA, but finding the first word to start a communication is still problematic and requires further investigation.

© All rights reserved Nikolova et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
Edit | Del

Zhang, Suling, Tremaine, Marilyn M., Egan, Richard, Milewski, Allen E., Plotnick, Linda, O'Sullivan, Patrick and Fjermestad, Jerry (2008): Occurrence and Effects of Leader Delegation in Virtual Teams. In: HICSS 2008 - 41st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 7-10 January, 2008, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 14. Available online

2007
 
Edit | Del

Tremaine, Marilyn M., Milewski, Allen E., Egan, Richard and Zhang, Suling (2007): A Tale of Two Teams: Success and Failure in Virtual Team Meetings. In: Aykin, Nuray M. (ed.) UI-HCII 2007 - Second International Conference on Usability and Internationalization - Part I July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 442-451. Available online

2006
 
Edit | Del

Boyd-Graber, Jordan L., Nikolova, Sonya S., Moffatt, Karyn, Kin, Kenrick C., Lee, Joshua Y., Mackey, Lester W., Tremaine, Marilyn M. and Klawe, Maria (2006): Participatory design with proxies: developing a desktop-PDA system to support people with aphasia. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 151-160. Available online

In this paper, we describe the design and preliminary evaluation of a hybrid desktop-handheld system developed to support individuals with aphasia, a disorder which impairs the ability to speak, read, write, or understand language. The system allows its users to develop speech communication through images and sound on a desktop computer and download this speech to a mobile device that can then support communication outside the home. Using a desktop computer for input addresses some of this population's difficulties interacting with handheld devices, while the mobile device addresses stigma and portability issues. A modified participatory design approach was used in which proxies, that is, speech-language pathologists who work with aphasic individuals, assumed the role normally filled by users. This was done because of the difficulties in communicating with the target population and the high variability in aphasic disorders. In addition, the paper presents a case study of the proxy-use participatory design process that illustrates how different interview techniques resulted in different user feedback.

© All rights reserved Boyd-Graber et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Chen, Xiaoyu, Tremaine, Marilyn M., Lutz, Robert, Chung, Jae-woo and Lacsina, Patrick (2006): AudioBrowser: a mobile browsable information access for the visually impaired. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 5 (1) pp. 4-22. Available online

Although a large amount of research has been conducted on building interfaces for the visually impaired that allows users to read web pages and generate and access information on computers, little development addresses two problems faced by the blind users. First, sighted users can rapidly browse and select information they find useful, and second, sighted users can make much useful information portable through the recent proliferation of personal digital assistants (PDAs). These possibilities are not currently available for blind users. This paper describes an interface that has been built on a standard PDA and allows its user to browse the information stored on it through a combination of screen touches coupled with auditory feedback. The system also supports the storage and management of personal information so that addresses, music, directions, and other supportive information can be readily created and then accessed anytime and anywhere by the PDA user. The paper describes the system along with the related design choices and design rationale. A user study is also reported.

© All rights reserved Chen et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
Edit | Del

Chen, Xiaoyu and Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2006): Patterns of Multimodal Input Usage in Non-Visual Information Navigation. In: HICSS 2006 - 39th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 4-7 January, 2006, Kauai, HI, USA. . Available online

2005
 
Edit | Del

Chen, Xiaoyu and Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2005): Multimodal user input patterns in a non-visual context. In: Seventh Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2005. pp. 206-207. Available online

How will users choose between speech and hand inputs to perform tasks when they are given equivalent choices between both modalities in a non-visual interface? This exploratory study investigates this question. The study was conducted using AudioBrowser, a non-visual information access for the visually impaired. Findings include: (1) Users chose between input modalities based on the type of operations undertaken. Navigation operations primarily used hand input on the touchpad, while non-navigation instructions primarily used speech input. (2) Surprisingly, multimodal error correction was not prevalent. Repeating a failed operation until it succeeded and trying other methods in the same input modality were dominant error-correction strategies. (3) The modality learned first was not necessarily the primary modality used later, but a training order effect existed. These empirical results provide implications for designing non-visual multimodal input dialogues.

© All rights reserved Chen and Tremaine and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Adamovich, Sergei V., Merians, Alma S., Boian, Rares F., Lewis, Jeffrey A., Tremaine, Marilyn M., Burdea, Grigore C., Recce, Michael and Poizner, Howard (2005): A Virtual Reality Based Exercise System for Hand Rehabilitation Post-Stroke. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 14 (2) pp. 161-174.

 
Edit | Del

Deutsch, Judith E., Lewis, Jeffrey A., Whitworth, Elizabeth, Boian, Rares F., Burdea, Grigore C. and Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2005): Formative Evaluation and Preliminary Findings of a Virtual Reality Telerehabilitation System for the Lower Extremity. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 14 (2) pp. 198-213.

 
Edit | Del

Tremaine, Marilyn M., Sarcevic, Aleksandra, Wu, Dezhi, Velez, Maria C., Dorohonceanu, Bogdan, Krebs, Allan Meng and Marsic, Ivan (2005): Size Does Matter in Computer Collaboration: Heterogeneous Platform Effects on Human-Human Interaction. In: HICSS 2005 - 38th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 3-6 January, 2005, Big Island, HI, USA. . Available online

 
Edit | Del

Zhang, Suling, Fjermestad, Jerry and Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2005): Leadership Styles in Virtual Team Context: Limitations, Solutions and Propositions. In: HICSS 2005 - 38th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 3-6 January, 2005, Big Island, HI, USA. . Available online

 
Edit | Del

Velez, Maria C., Silver, Deborah and Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2005): Understanding Visualization through Spatial Ability Differences. In: 16th IEEE Visualization Conference VIS 2005 23-28 October, 2005, Minneapolis, MN, USA. p. 65. Available online

2004
 
Edit | Del

Simone, Carla and Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2004): Preface. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 13 (5) pp. 347-348. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Velez, Maria, Tremaine, Marilyn M., Sarcevic, Aleksandra, Dorohonceanu, Bogdan, Krebs, Allan and Marsic, Ivan (2004): "Who's in charge here?" communicating across unequal computer platforms. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 11 (4) pp. 407-444. Available online

People use personal data assistants in the field to collect data and to communicate with others both in the field and office. The individual in the office invariably has a laptop or a high-end personal workstation and thus, significantly more computing power, more screen real estate, and higher volume input devices, such as a mouse and keyboard. These differences give the high-end user the ability to represent and manipulate collaborative tasks more effectively. It is therefore useful to know what impact these differences have on work performance and work communications. Four different platform combinations involving a PC and a PDA were used to examine the effect of communicating via heterogeneous computer platforms. The PC platform used a mouse, a keyboard, and a 3-dimensional screen display. The PDA platform used a stylus, soft buttons, and a 2-dimensional screen display. A variation of the Tetris wall-building game called Slow Tetris was used as the subjects' collaborative task. A second factor in the experiment was role asymmetry. One subject was arbitrarily put in charge of the task solution in all of the combinations. An analysis of the solution times found that subjects with mixed platforms worked slower than their homogeneous counterparts, that is, a person in charge with a PC worked faster if his partner had a PC. An in-depth analysis of the communication patterns found significant differences in the exchanges between heterogeneous and homogenous combinations. The PC-to-PDA combination (with the person on the PC in charge of the solution) took significantly more time than the PC-to-PC combination. This extra time appears to come from the disadvantage of having a partner on the PDA who is unable to help in solving the problems. The PDA-to-PC combination took approximately the same amount of time as the PDA-to-PDA combination despite having one team member with a better representation. This member was, unfortunately, not in charge of the solution. The PDA-to-PC heterogeneous combination exhibited more direction giving, less one-sided collaboration, and more takeover attempts than any of the other combinations. Overall, roles were maintained in the partnerships except for the person with the PDA directing the person with the PC.

© All rights reserved Velez et al. and/or ACM Press

2003
 
Edit | Del

Tremaine, Marilyn M. and Simone, Carla (eds.) Proceedings of the International ACM SIGGROUP Conference on Supporting Group Work 2003 November 9-12, 2003, Sanibel Island, Florida, USA.

 
Edit | Del

Kaur, Manpreet, Tremaine, Marilyn M., Huang, Ning, Wilder, Joseph, Gacovski, Zoran, Flippo, Frans and Mantravadi, Chandra Sekhar (2003): Where is "it"? Event Synchronization in Gaze-Speech Input Systems. In: Oviatt, Sharon L., Darrell, Trevor, Maybury, Mark T. and Wahlster, Wolfgang (eds.) Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2003 November 5-7, 2003, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 151-158. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Wu, Dezhi, Im, Il, Tremaine, Marilyn M., Instone, Keith and Turoff, Murray (2003): A Framework for Classifying Personalization Scheme Used on e-Commerce Websites. In: HICSS 2003 2003. p. 222. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Kaur, Manpreet, Tremaine, Marilyn M., Huang, Ning, Wilder, Joseph, Gacovski, Zoran, Flippo, Frans and Mantravadi, Chandra Sekhar (2003): Where is "it"? Event Synchronization in Gaze-Speech Input Systems. In: Proceedings of the 2003 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2003. pp. 151-158. Available online

The relationship between gaze and speech is explored for the simple task of moving an object from one location to another on a computer screen. The subject moves a designated object from a group of objects to a new location on the screen by stating, "Move it there". Gaze and speech data are captured to determine if we can robustly predict the selected object and destination position. We have found that the source fixation closest to the desired object begins, with high probability, before the beginning of the word "Move". An analysis of all fixations before and after speech onset time shows that the fixation that best identifies the object to be moved occurs, on average, 630 milliseconds before speech onset with a range of 150 to 1200 milliseconds for individual subjects. The variance in these times for individuals is relatively small although the variance across subjects is large. Selecting a fixation closest to the onset of the word "Move" as the designator of the object to be moved gives a system accuracy close to 95% for all subjects. Thus, although significant differences exist between subjects, we believe that the speech and gaze integration patterns can be modeled reliably for individual users and therefore be used to improve the performance of multimodal systems.

© All rights reserved Kaur et al. and/or their publisher

2002
 
Edit | Del

Marsic, Ivan, Krebs, Allan Meng, Dorohonceanu, Bogdan and Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2002): Designing and Examining PC to Palm Collaboration. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 47. Available online

2001
 
Edit | Del

Williams, Cliff and Tremaine, Marilyn M. (2001): Sound News: an audio browsing tool for the blind. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) HCI International 2001 - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 5-10, 2001, New Orleans, USA. pp. 1029-1033.

2000
 
Edit | Del

Jack, David, Boian, Rares, Merians, Alma, Adamovich, Sergei V., Tremaine, Marilyn M., Recce, Michael, Burdea, Grigore C. and Poizner, Howard (2000): A Virtual Reality-Based Exercise Program for Stroke Rehabilitation. In: Fourth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2000. pp. 56-63. Available online

A PC based desktop Virtual Reality system was developed for rehabilitating hand function in stroke patients. The system uses two hand input devices, a CyberGlove and a RMII force feedback glove, to allow the user to interact with one of four rehabilitation exercises. Each of which is designed to exercise one specific parameter of hand movement, namely range, speed, fractionation or strength. The therapy program is semi-automated and personalized to each user through the use of performance-based target levels. These are adapted between sessions in order to induce the user to improve. Feedback is provided to each user throughout the exercise sessions. To further motivate the user to continue the exercise program, screen displays are designed as interactive games. The system is described and sample data is presented from preliminary studies performed on control subjects.

© All rights reserved Jack et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
Edit | Del

Tremaine, Marilyn M. (1999): A New Vision for SIGCHI. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 31 (3) pp. 2-3. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Tremaine, Marilyn M. and Mackay, Wendy E. (1999): Web Weaving. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 31 (4) p. 3. Available online

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/marilyn_m__tremaine.html