Publication statistics

Pub. period:2000-2012
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:24



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Iulian Radu:
Landon LaPorte:
Evan Barba:

 

 

Productive colleagues

Maribeth Gandy's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Thad Starner:49
Blair MacIntyre:43
Jay David Bolter:22
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
go to course
User Experience: The Beginner's Guide
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Maribeth Gandy

 

Publications by Maribeth Gandy (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

LaPorte, Landon, McLaughlin, Anne Collins, Whitlock, Laura A., Gandy, Maribeth and Trujillo, Amanda K. (2012): Motor skill acquisition in a virtual world by older adults: Relationships between age, physical activity, and performance. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2012 Annual Meeting 2012. pp. 2084-2088. Available online

Increased age and physical activity both affect motor learning (Colcombe&Kramer, 2003). However, it is unknown how differences in age and changes in daily physical activity affect motor skill acquisition and performance in a virtual world, where feedback on motor actions is offered visually via the software. Using a Nintendo Wii interactive gaming console (IGC), we examined motor skill acquisition in a virtual world for older adults ranging from the young-old (65-79) to the oldest-old (over 80), taking into account their daily reports of physical activity. Multi-level modeling will be used to determine how physical activity and age differences interact to predict success in the motor skill acquisition of a complex movement that results in an object throw in the virtual world. Analysis of results is in progress.

© All rights reserved LaPorte et al. and/or Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

2008
 
Edit | Del

Xu, Yan, Gandy, Maribeth, Deen, Sami, Schrank, Brian, Spreen, Kim, Gorbsky, Michael, White, Timothy, Barba, Evan, Radu, Iulian, Bolter, Jay David and MacIntyre, Blair (2008): BragFish: exploring physical and social interaction in co-located handheld augmented reality games. In: Inakage, Masa and Cheok, Adrian David (eds.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2008 December 3-5, 2008, Yokohama, Japan. pp. 276-283. Available online

2005
 
Edit | Del

Dow, Steven, Lee, Jaemin, Oezbek, Christopher, MacIntyre, Blair, Bolter, Jay David and Gandy, Maribeth (2005): Wizard of Oz interfaces for mixed reality applications. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1339-1342. Available online

One important tool for developing complex interactive applications is "Wizard of Oz "(WOz)simulation. WOz simulation allows design concepts,content and partially completed applications to be tested on users without the need to first create a completely working system. In this paper we discuss the integration of wizard interface tools into a Mixed Reality (MR)design environment and show how easier creation and evolution of wizard interfaces can lead to an expanded role for WOz-based testing during the design evolution of MR experiences. We share our experiences designing an audio experience in an historic site,and illustrate the evolution of the wizard interfaces alongside the user experience

© All rights reserved Dow et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Gandy, Maribeth, MacIntyre, Blair, Presti, Peter, Dow, Steven, Bolter, Jay David, Yarbrough, Brandon and O'Rear, Nigel (2005): AR Karaoke: Acting in Your Favorite Scenes. In: Fourth IEEE and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality ISMAR 2005 5-8 October, 2005, Vienna, Austria. pp. 114-117. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Dow, Steven, Lee, Jaemin, Oezbek, Christopher, MacIntyre, Blair, Bolter, Jay David and Gandy, Maribeth (2005): Exploring spatial narratives and mixed reality experiences in Oakland Cemetery. In: Lee, Newton (ed.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2005 June 15-15, 2005, Valencia, Spain. pp. 51-60. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Dow, Steven, MacIntyre, Blair, Lee, Jaemin, Oezbek, Christopher, Bolter, Jay David and Gandy, Maribeth (2005): Wizard of Oz support throughout an iterative design process. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (4) pp. 18-26. Available online

2004
 
Edit | Del

MacIntyre, Blair, Gandy, Maribeth, Dow, Steven and Bolter, Jay David (2004): DART: a toolkit for rapid design exploration of augmented reality experiences. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 197-206. Available online

In this paper, we describe The Designer\'s Augmented Reality Toolkit (DART). DART is built on top of Macromedia Director, a widely used multimedia development environment. We summarize the most significant problems faced by designers working with AR in the real world, and discuss how DART addresses them. Most of DART is implemented in an interpreted scripting language, and can be modified by designers to suit their needs. Our work focuses on supporting early design activities, especially a rapid transition from story-boards to working experience, so that the experiential part of a design can be tested early and often. DART allows designers to specify complex relationships between the physical and virtual worlds, and supports 3D animatic actors (informal, sketch-based content) in addition to more polished content. Designers can capture and replay synchronized video and sensor data, allowing them to work off-site and to test specific parts of their experience more effectively.

© All rights reserved MacIntyre et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Gandy, Maribeth, MacIntyre, Blair and Dow, Steven (2004): Making Tracking Technology Accessible in a Rapid Prototyping Environment. In: 3rd IEEE and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality ISMAR 2004 2-5 November, 2004, Arlington, VA, USA. pp. 282-283. Available online

2003
 
Edit | Del

MacIntyre, Blair, Gandy, Maribeth, Bolter, Jay David, Dow, Steven and Hannigan, Brendan (2003): DART: The Designer's Augmented Reality Toolkit. In: 2003 IEEE and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality ISMAR 2003 7-10 October, 2003, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 329-330. Available online

2000
 
Edit | Del

Starner, Thad, Auxier, Jake, Ashbrook, Daniel and Gandy, Maribeth (2000): The gesture pendant: a self-illuminating, wearable, infrared computer vision system for home automation control and medical monitoring. In: Proceedings of the 4th IEEE International Symposium on Wearable Computers October 16-17, 2000, Atlanta, USA. pp. 87-94. Available online

In this paper we present a wearable device for control of home automation systems via hand gestures. This solution has many advantages over traditional home automation interfaces in that it can be used by those with loss of vision, motor skills, and mobility. By combining other sources of context with the pendant we can reduce the number and complexity of gestures while maintaining functionality. As users input gestures, the system can also analyze their movements for pathological tremors. This information can then be used for medical diagnosis, therapy, and emergency services.Currently, the Gesture Pendant can recognize control gestures with an accuracy of 95% and user- defined gestures with an accuracy of 97% It can detect tremors above 2HZ within +/- .1 Hz.

© All rights reserved Starner et al. and/or their publisher

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/maribeth_gandy.html