Publication statistics

Pub. period:1986-1995
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:23



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Douglas J. Gillan:5
Susan Adam:2
Tim McKay:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Marianne Rudisill's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Peter G. Polson:46
Clayton H. Lewis:37
Douglas J. Gillan:31
 
 
 

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Marianne Rudisill

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Publications by Marianne Rudisill (bibliography)

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1995
 
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Rudisill, Marianne, Lewis, Clayton H., Polson, Peter G. and McKay, Tim (eds.) (1995): Human-Computer Interface Design: Success Stories, Emerging Methods, and Real-World Context. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers

1992
 
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McClumpha, Andrew, Bugge, Peter, Lebacqz, Vic, Abbott, Kathy, Rudisill, Marianne and Wilson, Paul (1992): Human Factors and Flight Deck Automation. In: Monk, Andrew, Diaper, Dan and Harrison, Michael D. (eds.) Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of the British Computer Society Human Computer Interaction Specialist Group - People and Computers VII August 15-18, 1992, University of York, UK. pp. 489-491.

 
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Gillan, Douglas J., Holden, Kritina, Adam, Susan, Rudisill, Marianne and Magee, Laura (1992): How Should Fitts' Law be Applied to Human-Computer Interaction?. In Interacting with Computers, 4 (3) pp. 289-313.

The paper challenges the notion that any Fitts' Law model can be applied generally to human computer interaction, and proposes instead that applying Fitts' Law requires knowledge of the users' sequence of movements, direction of movement, and typical movement amplitudes as well as target sizes. Two experiments examined a text selection task with sequences of controlled movements (point-click and point-drag). For the point-click sequence, a Fitts' Law model that used the diagonal across the text object in the direction of pointing (rather than the horizontal extent of the text object) as the target size provided the best fit for the pointing time data, whereas for the point-drag sequence, a Fitts' Law model that used the vertical size of the text object as the target size gave the best fit. Dragging times were fitted well by Fitts' Law models that used either the vertical or horizontal size of the terminal character in the text object. Additional results of note were that pointing in the point-click sequence was consistently faster than in the point-drag sequence, and that pointing in either sequence was consistently faster than dragging. The discussion centres around the need to define task characteristics before applying Fitts' Law to an interface design or analysis, analyses of pointing and of dragging, and implications for interface design.

© All rights reserved Gillan et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 Cited in the following chapter:

Fitts's Law: [/encyclopedia/fitts_law.html]


 
1991
 
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Holden, Kritina L., Muratore, Debra and Rudisill, Marianne (1991): The Evaluation of Cursor Control Devices for Space Station Freedom. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 23 (4) pp. 66-67.

 
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Donner, Kimberly A., McKay, Tim, O'Brien, Kevin M. and Rudisill, Marianne (1991): Display Format and Highlighting Validity Effects on Search Performance Using Complex Visual Displays. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 35th Annual Meeting 1991. pp. 374-378.

374 Research examining display format and highlight validity (Tullis, 1984; Fisher&Tan, 1989) have shown that these factors affect visual display search; however, these studies have been conducted on small, artificial alphanumeric displays. The present study manipulated these variables, applying them to realistic, complex Space Shuttle displays. A 2 (display type: Orbit Maneuver Execute, Relative Navigation) x 2 (display format: current, reformatted [following human-computer interface design principles]) x 3 (highlighting validity: valid, invalid, no-highlight) within-subjects analysis of variance found significant main effects of these variables on search time and a significant format by highlight interaction. Search through the current, poorly-formatted displays benefited from valid application of highlight, and showed no cost of invalid highlight. Reformatted displays demonstrated neither reliable cost nor benefit of highlight application. Significant correlations were found between observed search times and search times predicted by Tullis' Display Analysis Program (1986): the relationship was highest with non-highlighted displays and was less predictive with valid and invalid highlight applications. Issues discussed include the enhancement of search through format and highlighting, and the necessity to consider several factors when predicting search performance.

© All rights reserved Donner et al. and/or Human Factors Society

 
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Gugerty, Leo, Halgren, Shannon, Gosbee, John and Rudisill, Marianne (1991): Using GOMS Model and Hypertext to Create Representations of Medical Procedures for Online Display. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 35th Annual Meeting 1991. pp. 713-717.

This study investigated two methods to improve organization and presentation of computer-based medical procedures. A literature review suggested that the GOMS (goals, operators, methods, and selection rules) model can assist in rigorous task analysis, which can then help generate initial design ideas for the human-computer interface. GOMS models are hierarchical in nature, so this study also investigated the effect of hierarchical, hypertext interfaces. We used a 2x2 between subjects design, including the following independent variables: procedure organization -- GOMS model based vs. medical-textbook based; navigation type -- hierarchical vs. linear (booklike). After naive subjects studied the online procedures, measures were taken of their memory for the content and the organization of the procedures. This design was repeated for two medical procedures. For one procedure, subjects who studied GOMS-based and hierarchical procedures remembered more about the procedures than other subjects. The results for the other procedure were less clear. However, data for both procedures showed a "GOMSification effect". That is, when asked to do a free recall of a procedure, subjects who had studied a textbook procedure often recalled key information in a location inconsistent with the procedure they actually studied, but consistent with the GOMS-based procedure.

© All rights reserved Gugerty et al. and/or Human Factors Society

1990
 
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Gillan, Douglas J., Holden, Kritina, Adam, Susan, Rudisill, Marianne and Magee, Laura (1990): How Does Fitts' Law Fit Pointing and Dragging?. In: Carrasco, Jane and Whiteside, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 90 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference 1990, Seattle, Washington,USA. pp. 227-234.

Two experiments examined selecting text using a movement sequence of pointing and dragging. Experiment 1 showed that, in the Point-Drag sequence, the pointing time was related to the pointing distance but not to the width of the text to be selected; in contrast, pointing time was related to both the pointing distance and the width of the text in the Point-Click sequence. Experiment 2 demonstrated that both the pointing and dragging times for the Point-Drag sequence were sensitive to the height of the text that was selected. The discussion of the results centers around the application of Fitts' Law to pointing and dragging in a point-drag sequence, proposing that the target for pointing is the leftmost edge of the text to be selected, and the target for dragging is the rightmost edge of the text.

© All rights reserved Gillan et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Fitts's Law: [/encyclopedia/fitts_law.html]


 
1989
 
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Rudisill, Marianne and Gillan, Douglas J. (1989): Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center. In: Bice, Ken and Lewis, Clayton H. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 89 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 30 - June 4, 1989, Austin, Texas. pp. 55-56.

 
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Gillan, Douglas J., Lewis, Robert and Rudisill, Marianne (1989): Models of User Interactions with Graphical Interfaces: I. Statistical Graphs. In: Bice, Ken and Lewis, Clayton H. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 89 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 30 - June 4, 1989, Austin, Texas. pp. 375-380.

Three models of human interactions with computer-displayed statistical graphics were developed and tested in an experiment which examined users' speed and accuracy on identification and comparison questions using 17 graph types. The results indicated that response time and accuracy were influenced by the perceptual and informational complexity of the graph, as well as the relation between the figure and axes, (Model 1); by the physical elements of the graph -- points, lines, and areas (Model 2); and by the data-ink ratio and data density (Model 3). The discussion focuses on the development of a single integrated model of interactions with graphics.

© All rights reserved Gillan et al. and/or ACM Press

1988
 
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Desaulniers, David R., Gillan, Douglas J. and Rudisill, Marianne (1988): The Effects of Format in Computer-Based Procedure Displays. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 32nd Annual Meeting 1988. pp. 291-295.

Two experiments were conducted to investigate display variables likely to influence the effectiveness of computer-based procedure displays. In Experiment 1, procedures were presented in three formats, Text, Extended-Test, and Flowchart. Text and Extended-Text are structured prose formats which differ in the spatial density of presentation. The Flowchart format differs from the Text format in both syntax and spatial representation. Subjects were required to use the procedures to diagnose a hypothetical system anomaly. The results indicate that performance was most accurate with the Flowchart format. Although overall completion times did not differ significantly across formats, the Flowchart format required significantly less time for step implementation. In Experiment 2, procedure window size was varied (6-line, 12-line, and 24-line) in addition to procedure format. In the six line window condition, Experiment 2 replicated the findings of Experiment 1. Procedures in the Flowchart format were completed with greater accuracy than procedures in either of the test formats. As predicted, completion times for Flowchart procedures decreased with increasing window size; however, accuracy of performance decreased substantially. Implications for the design of computer-based procedure displays are discussed.

© All rights reserved Desaulniers et al. and/or Human Factors Society

1986
 
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Burns, Michael J., Warren, Dianne L. and Rudisill, Marianne (1986): Formatting Space-Related Displays to Optimize Expert and Nonexpert User Performance. In: Mantei, Marilyn and Orbeton, Peter (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 86 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 13-17, 1986, Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 274-280.

NASA Space Station missions will include crewmembers who are highly experienced in the use of the Space Station computer system, as well as others who are novices. Previous research into novice-expert differences has strongly implied that user interface changes that aid novices tend to impair experts and vice versa. This experiment investigated the impact reformatting alphanumeric information on current Space Shuttle computer displays had on the speed and accuracy of experts and nonexperts in two different search tasks. Large improvements in speed and accuracy were found for nonexperts on the reformatted displays. Experts had fewer errors but no response time difference on reformatted displays. Differences in expert and nonexpert search strategies and implications for the design of computer displays are discussed.

© All rights reserved Burns et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

27 Jun 2007: Modified
26 Jun 2007: Modified
26 Jun 2007: Modified
25 Jun 2007: Modified
23 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/marianne_rudisill.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1986-1995
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:23



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Douglas J. Gillan:5
Susan Adam:2
Tim McKay:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Marianne Rudisill's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Peter G. Polson:46
Clayton H. Lewis:37
Douglas J. Gillan:31
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Quality Web Communication: The Beginner's Guide
89% booked. Starts in 6 days
go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
83% booked. Starts in 12 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading