Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2011
Pub. count:12
Number of co-authors:20



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Jan Borchers:10
Roger Jennings:3
James D. Hollan:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Malte Weiss's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Kris Luyten:51
James D. Hollan:49
Jan Borchers:38
 
 
 
Jul 26

The display is the computer.

-- Jen-Hsun Huang, 2002

 
 

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Malte Weiss

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Publications by Malte Weiss (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Weiss, Malte, Remy, Christian and Borchers, Jan (2011): Rendering physical effects in tabletop controls. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3009-3012.

We introduce dynamic physical properties as an additional degree of freedom for passive tabletop controls. Using electromagnetic actuation, we manipulate attributes of tangibles on the fly, such as perceived weight, spring resistance, friction, and latching. We describe our actuation concepts, prototypes, and measurements showing that magnetic fields can change physical effects in a linear way. Controlled experiments reveal that participants can tactually distinguish four rendered resistance levels of a button prototype and easily detect dynamic detents in a continuous slider. Finally, we describe how adjustable physical properties in tangibles can enhance tabletop interaction.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Luyten, Kris, Vanacken, Davy, Weiss, Malte, Borchers, Jan and Nacenta, Miguel (2011): Second workshop on engineering patterns for multi-touch interfaces. In: ACM SIGCHI 2011 Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems 2011. pp. 335-336.

Multi-touch gained a lot of interest in the last couple of years and the increased availability of multi-touch enabled hardware boosted its development. However, the current diversity of hardware, toolkits, and tools for creating multi-touch interfaces has its downsides: there is only little reusable material and no generally accepted body of knowledge when it comes to the development of multi-touch interfaces. This workshop is the second workshop on this topic and the workshop goal remains unchanged: to seek a consensus on methods, approaches, toolkits, and tools that aid in the engineering of multi-touch interfaces and transcend the differences in available platforms. The patterns mentioned in the title indicate that we are aiming to create a reusable body of knowledge.

© All rights reserved Luyten et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Voelker, Simon, Weiss, Malte, Wacharamanotham, Chat and Borchers, Jan (2011): Dynamic portals: a lightweight metaphor for fast object transfer on interactive surfaces. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 158-161.

We introduce Dynamic Portals, a lightweight interaction technique to transfer virtual objects across tabletops. They maintain the spatial coherence of objects and inherently align them to the recipients' workspace. Furthermore, they allow the exchange of digital documents among multiple users. A remote view enables users to align their objects at the target location. This paper explores the interaction technique and shows how our concept can also be applied as zoomable viewport and shared workspace.

© All rights reserved Voelker et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Malte, Wacharamanotham, Chat, Voelker, Simon and Borchers, Jan (2011): FingerFlux: near-surface haptic feedback on tabletops. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 615-620.

We introduce FingerFlux, an output technique to generate near-surface haptic feedback on interactive tabletops. Our system combines electromagnetic actuation with permanent magnets attached to the user's hand. FingerFlux lets users feel the interface before touching, and can create both attracting and repelling forces. This enables applications such as reducing drifting, adding physical constraints to virtual controls, and guiding the user without visual output. We show that users can feel vibration patterns up to 35 mm above our table, and that FingerFlux can significantly reduce drifting when operating on-screen buttons without looking.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Weiss, Malte, Schwarz, Florian, Jakubowski, Simon and Borchers, Jan (2010): Madgets: actuating widgets on interactive tabletops. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 293-302.

We present a system for the actuation of tangible magnetic widgets (Madgets) on interactive tabletops. Our system combines electromagnetic actuation with fiber optic tracking to move and operate physical controls. The presented mechanism supports actuating complex tangibles that consist of multiple parts. A grid of optical fibers transmits marker positions past our actuation hardware to cameras below the table. We introduce a visual tracking algorithm that is able to detect objects and touches from the strongly sub-sampled video input of that grid. Six sample Madgets illustrate the capabilities of our approach, ranging from tangential movement and height actuation to inductive power transfer. Madgets combine the benefits of passive, untethered, and translucent tangibles with the ability to actuate them with multiple degrees of freedom.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Weiss, Malte (2010): Bringing everyday applications to interactive surfaces. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 375-378.

This paper presents ongoing work that intends to simplify the introduction of everyday applications to interactive tabletops. SLAP Widgets bring tangible general-purpose widgets to tabletops while providing the flexibility of on-screen controls. Madgets maintain consistency between physical controls and their digital state. BendDesk represents our vision of a multi-touch enabled office environment. Our pattern language captures knowledge for the design of interactive tabletops. For each project, we describe its technical background, present the current state of research, and discuss future work.

© All rights reserved Weiss and/or his/her publisher

2009
 
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Weiss, Malte, Wagner, Julie, Jansen, Yvonne, Jennings, Roger, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Hollan, James D. and Borchers, Jan (2009): SLAP widgets: bridging the gap between virtual and physical controls on tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 481-490.

We present Silicone iLluminated Active Peripherals (SLAP), a system of tangible, translucent widgets for use on multitouch tabletops. SLAP Widgets are cast from silicone or made of acrylic, and include sliders, knobs, keyboards, and buttons. They add tactile feedback to multi-touch tables, improving input accuracy. Using rear projection, SLAP Widgets can be relabeled dynamically, providing inexpensive, battery-free, and untethered augmentations. Furthermore, SLAP combines the flexibility of virtual objects with physical affordances. We evaluate how SLAP Widgets influence the user experience on tabletops compared to virtual controls. Empirical studies show that SLAPWidgets are easy to use and outperform virtual controls significantly in terms of accuracy and overall interaction time.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Malte, Jennings, Roger, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Borchers, Jan, Wagner, Julie, Jansen, Yvonne and Hollan, James D. (2009): SLAP widgets: bridging the gap between virtual and physical controls on tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3229-3234.

We present Silicone iLluminated Active Peripherals (SLAP), a system of tangible, transparent widgets for use on vision-based multi-touch tabletops. SLAP Widgets are cast from silicone or made of acrylic and include sliders, knobs, keyboards, and keypads. They add tactile feedback to multi-touch tables and can be dynamically relabeled with rear projection. They are inexpensive, battery-free, and untethered widgets combining the flexibility of virtual objects with tangible affordances of physical objects. Our demonstration shows how SLAP Widgets can augment input on multi-touch tabletops with modest infrastructure costs.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Drobny, Dieter, Weiss, Malte and Borchers, Jan (2009): Saltate!: a sensor-based system to support dance beginners. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3943-3948.

We present Saltate!, a wireless prototype system to support beginners of ballroom dancing. Saltate! acquires data from force sensors mounted under the dancers' feet, detects steps, and compares their timing to the timing of beats in the music playing. If it detects mistakes, Saltate! emphasizes the beats in the music acoustically to help the dancing couple stay in sync with the music.

© All rights reserved Drobny et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Heller, Florian, Knott, Thomas, Weiss, Malte and Borchers, Jan (2009): Multi-user interaction in virtual audio spaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4489-4494.

Audio guides are a common way to provide museum visitors with an opportunity for personalized, self-paced information retrieval. However, this personalization conflicts with some of the reasons many people go to museums, i.e., to socialize, to be with friends, and to discuss the exhibit as they experience it [1]. We developed an interactive museum experience based on audio augmented reality that lets the visitor interact with a virtual spatial audio soundscape. In this paper, we present some new interaction metaphors we use in the design of this audio space, as well as some techniques to generate a group experience within audio spaces.

© All rights reserved Heller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Malte, Wagner, Julie, Jennings, Roger, Jansen, Yvonne, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Hollan, James D. and Borchers, Jan (2009): SLAPbook: tangible widgets on multi-touch tables in groupware environments. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 297-300.

2008
 
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Karrer, Thorsten, Weiss, Malte, Lee, Eric and Borcers, Jan (2008): DRAGON: a direct manipulation interface for frame-accurate in-scene video navigation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 247-250.

We present DRAGON, a direct manipulation interaction technique for frame-accurate navigation in video scenes. This technique benefits tasks such as professional and amateur video editing, review of sports footage, and forensic analysis of video scenes. By directly dragging objects in the scene along their movement trajectory, DRAGON enables users to quickly and precisely navigate to a specific point in the video timeline where an object of interest is in a desired location. Examples include the specific frame where a sprinter crosses the finish line, or where a car passes a traffic light. Through a user study, we show that DRAGON significantly reduces task completion time for in-scene navigation tasks by an average of 19-42% compared to a standard timeline slider. Qualitative feedback from users is also positive, with multiple users indicating that the DRAGON interaction felt more natural than the traditional timeline slider for in-scene navigation.

© All rights reserved Karrer et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Apr 2012: Modified
04 Apr 2012: Modified
04 Apr 2012: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
12 May 2008: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/malte_weiss.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2011
Pub. count:12
Number of co-authors:20



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Jan Borchers:10
Roger Jennings:3
James D. Hollan:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Malte Weiss's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Kris Luyten:51
James D. Hollan:49
Jan Borchers:38
 
 
 
Jul 26

The display is the computer.

-- Jen-Hsun Huang, 2002

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!