Publication statistics

Pub. period:1992-2007
Pub. count:12
Number of co-authors:18



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Andreas Girgensohn:9
Frank Shipman:5
John Adcock:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Lynn D. Wilcox's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Andreas Girgensohn:46
Gene Golovchinsky:39
Frank Shipman:36
 
 
 

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Lynn D. Wilcox

Has also published under the name of:
"Lynn Wilcox" and "L. Wilcox"

 

Publications by Lynn D. Wilcox (bibliography)

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2007
 
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Girgensohn, Andreas, Shipman, Frank, Turner, Thea and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2007): Effects of presenting geographic context on tracking activity between cameras. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1167-1176. Available online

A common video surveillance task is to keep track of people moving around the space being monitored. It is often difficult to track activity between cameras because locations such as hallways in office buildings can look quite similar and do not indicate the spatial proximity of the cameras. We describe a spatial video player that orients nearby video feeds with the field of view of the main playing video to aid in tracking between cameras. This is compared with the traditional bank of cameras with and without interactive maps for identifying and selecting cameras. We additionally explore the value of static and rotating maps for tracking activity between cameras. The study results show that both the spatial video player and the map improve user performance when compared to the camera-bank interface. Also, subjects change cameras more often with the spatial player than either the camera bank or the map, when available.

© All rights reserved Girgensohn et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Shipman, Frank, Girgensohn, Andreas and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2005): Hypervideo expression: experiences with hyper-hitchcock. In: Proceedings of the Sixteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2005. pp. 217-226. Available online

Hyper-Hitchcock is a hypervideo editor enabling the direct manipulation authoring of a particular form of hypervideo called "detail-on-demand video." This form of hypervideo allows a single link out of the currently playing video to provide more details on the content currently being presented. A workspace is used to select, group, and arrange video clips into several linear sequences. Navigational links placed between the video elements are assigned labels and return behaviors appropriate to the goals of the hypervideo and the role of the destination video. Hyper-Hitchcock was used by students in a Computers and New Media class to author hypervideos on a variety of topics. The produced hypervideos provide examples of hypervideo structures and the link properties and behaviors needed to support them. Feedback from students identified additional link behaviors and features required to support new hypervideo genres. This feedback is valuable for the redesign of Hyper-Hitchcock and the design of hypervideo editors in general.

© All rights reserved Shipman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Girgensohn, Andreas, Adcock, John, Cooper, Matthew and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2005): Interactive search in large video collections. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1395-1398. Available online

We present a search interface for large video collections with time-aligned text transcripts. The system is designed for users such as intelligence analysts that need to quickly find video clips relevant to a topic expressed in text and images. A key component of the system is a powerful and flexible user interface that incorporates dynamic visualizations of the underlying multimedia objects. The interface displays search results in ranked sets of story keyframe collages, and lets users explore the shots in a story. By adapting the keyframe collages based on query relevance and indicating which portions of the video have already been explored, we enable users to quickly find relevant sections. We tested our system as part of the NIST TRECVID interactive search evaluation, and found that our user interface enabled users to find more relevant results within the allotted time than those of many systems employing more sophisticated analysis techniques.

© All rights reserved Girgensohn et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Girgensohn, Andreas, Adcock, John, Cooper, M. and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2005): A Synergistic Approach to Efficient Interactive Video Retrieval. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT05: Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 781-794. Available online

A video database can contain a large number of videos ranging from several minutes to several hours in length. Typically, it is not sufficient to search just for relevant videos, because the task still remains to find the relevant clip, typically less than one minute of length, within the video. This makes it impor tant to direct the users attention to the most promising material and to indicate what material they already investigated. Based on this premise, we created a video search system with a powerful and flexible user interface that incorporates dynamic visualizations of the underlying multimedia objects. The system employes an automatic story segmentation, combines text and visual search, and displays search results in ranked sets of story keyframe collages. By adapting the keyframe collages based on query relevance and indicating which portions of the video have already been explored, we enable users to quickly find relevant sec tions. We tested our system as part of the NIST TRECVID interactive search evaluation, and found that our user interface enabled users to find more relevant results within the allotted time than other systems employing more sophisticated analysis techniques but less helpful user interfaces.

© All rights reserved Girgensohn et al. and/or Springer Verlag

2003
 
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Shipman, Frank, Girgensohn, Andreas and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2003): Combining spatial and navigational structure in the hyper-hitchcock hypervideo editor. In: Proceedings of the Fourteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2003. pp. 124-125. Available online

Existing hypertext systems have emphasized either the navigational or spatial expression of relationships between objects. We are exploring the combination of these modes of expression in Hyper-Hitchcock, a hypervideo editor. Hyper-Hitchcock supports a form of hypervideo called "detail-on-demand video" due to its applicability to situations where viewers need to take a link to view more details on the content currently being presented. Authors of detail-on-demand video select, group, and spatially arrange video clips into linear sequences in a two-dimensional workspace. Hyper-Hitchcock uses a simple spatial parser to determine the temporal order of selected video clips. Authors add navigational links between the elements in those sequences. This combination of navigational and spatial hypertext modes of expression separates the clip sequence from the navigational structure of the hypervideo. Such a combination can be useful in cases where multiple forms of inter-object relationships must be expressed on the same content.

© All rights reserved Shipman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Shipman, Frank, Girgensohn, Andreas and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2003): Hyper-Hitchcock: Towards the Easy Authoring of Interactive Video. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 33.

 
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Girgensohn, Andreas, Adcock, John, Cooper, Matthew, Foote, Jonathan and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2003): Simplifying the Management of Large Photo Collections. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 196.

2001
 
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Girgensohn, Andreas, Bly, Sara A., Shipman, Frank, Boreczky, J. and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2001): Home Video Editing Made Easy - Balancing Automation and User Control. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT01: Human-Computer Interaction 2001, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 464-471.

2000
 
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Girgensohn, Andreas, Boreczky, John, Chiu, Patrick, Doherty, John, Foote, Jonathan, Golovchinsky, Gene, Uchihashi, Shingo and Wilcox, Lynn D. (2000): A Semi-Automatic Approach to Home Video Editing. In: Ackerman, Mark S. and Edwards, Keith (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 2000, San Diego, California, United States. pp. 81-89. Available online

1998
 
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Chiu, Patrick and Wilcox, Lynn D. (1998): A Dynamic Grouping Technique for Ink and Audio Notes. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 195-202. Available online

In this paper, we describe a technique for dynamically grouping digital ink and audio to support user interaction in freeform note-taking systems. For ink, groups of strokes might correspond to words, lines, or paragraphs of handwritten text. For audio, groups might be a complete spoken phrase or a speaker turn in a conversation. Ink and audio grouping is important for editing operations such as deleting or moving chunks of ink and audio notes. The grouping technique is based on hierarchical agglomerative clustering. This clustering algorithm yields groups of ink or audio in a range of sizes, depending on the level in the hierarchy, and thus provides structure for simple interactive selection and rapid non-linear expansion of a selection. Ink and audio grouping is also important for marking portions of notes for subsequent browsing and retrieval. Integration of the ink and audio clusters provides a flexible way to browse the notes by selecting the ink cluster and playing the corresponding audio cluster.

© All rights reserved Chiu and Wilcox and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Wilcox, Lynn D., Schilit, Bill N. and Sawhney, Nitin (1997): Dynomite: A Dynamically Organized Ink and Audio Notebook. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 186-193. Available online

Dynomite is a portable electronic notebook for the capture and retrieval of handwritten and audio notes. The goal of Dynomite is to merge the organization, search, and data acquisition capabilities of a computer with the benefits of a paper-based notebook. Dynomite provides novel solutions in four key problem areas. First, Dynomite uses a casual, low cognitive overhead interface. Second, for content indexing of notes, Dynomite uses ink properties and keywords. Third, to assist organization, Dynomite's properties and keywords define views, presenting a subset of the notebook content that dynamically changes as users add new information. Finally, to augment handwritten notes with audio on devices with limited storage, Dynomite continuously records audio, but only permanently stores those parts highlighted by the user.

© All rights reserved Wilcox et al. and/or ACM Press

1992
 
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Wilcox, Lynn D., Smith, Ian and Bush, Marcia (1992): Wordspotting for Voice Editing and Audio Indexing. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 655-656. Available online

 
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