Publication statistics

Pub. period:2010-2011
Pub. count:5
Number of co-authors:5



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

James D. Hollan:2
Nadir Weibel:2
William G. Griswold:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Lisa G. Cowan's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James D. Hollan:49
Nadir Weibel:28
William G. Griswol..:19
 
 
 

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Lisa G. Cowan

 

Publications by Lisa G. Cowan (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Cowan, Lisa G. and Li, Kevin A. (2011): ShadowPuppets: supporting collocated interaction with mobile projector phones using hand shadows. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2707-2716. Available online

Pico projectors attached to mobile phones allow users to view phone content using a large display. However, to provide input to projector phones, users have to look at the device, diverting their attention from the projected image. Additionally, other collocated users have no way of interacting with the device. We present ShadowPuppets, a system that supports collocated interaction with mobile projector phones. ShadowPuppets allows users to cast hand shadows as input to mobile projector phones. Most people understand how to cast hand shadows, which provide an easy input modality. Additionally, they implicitly support collocated usage, as nearby users can cast shadows as input and one user can see and understand another user's hand shadows. We describe the results of three user studies. The first study examines what hand shadows users expect will cause various effects. The second study looks at how users perceive hand shadows, examining what effects they think various hand shadows will cause. Finally, we present qualitative results from a study with our functional prototype and discuss design implications for systems using shadows as input. Our findings suggest that shadow input can provide a natural and intuitive way of interacting with projected interfaces and can support collocated collaboration.

© All rights reserved Cowan and Li and/or their publisher

 
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Cowan, Lisa G., Weibel, Nadir, Pina, Laura R., Hollan, James D. and Griswold, William G. (2011): Ubiquitous sketching for social media. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 395-404. Available online

Digital social media have transformed how we communicate and manage our relationships. Despite its portability, sketching as a social medium has been largely left behind. Given sketching's unique affordances for visual communication this absence is a real loss. Sketches convey visuo-spatial ideas directly, require minimal detail to render concepts, and show the peculiarities of handwriting. Sketching holds the promise to enrich how we communicate, and its ubiquity is critical for sharing information at opportune moments. We present the results of an exploratory field study of ubiquitous sketching for social media, documenting users' experiences with UbiSketch. This system integrates digital pens, paper, and mobile phones to support the transmission of paper sketches to online services. We learned that UbiSketch enabled participants to leverage sketching's unique affordances, that ubiquitous sketching creates a synergy with the practice of posting context-dependent information, and that it broadens and deepens social interaction.

© All rights reserved Cowan et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Cowan, Lisa G. (2010): Supporting self-expression for informal communication. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 453-456. Available online

Mobile phones are becoming the central tools for communicating and can help us keep in touch with friends and family on-the-go. However, they can also place high demands on attention and constrain interaction. My research concerns how to design communication mechanisms that mitigate these problems to support self-expression for informal communication on mobile phones. I will study how people communicate with camera-phone photos, paper-based sketches, and projected information and how this communication impacts social practices.

© All rights reserved Cowan and/or his/her publisher

 
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Cowan, Lisa G. (2010): Supporting self-expression for informal communication. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 351-354. Available online

Mobile phones are becoming the central tools for communicating and can help us keep in touch with friends and family on-the-go. However, they can also place high demands on attention and constrain interaction. My research concerns how to design communication mechanisms that mitigate these problems to support self-expression for informal communication on mobile phones. I will study how people communicate with camera-phone photos, paper-based sketches, and projected information and how this communication impacts social practices.

© All rights reserved Cowan and/or his/her publisher

 
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Weibel, Nadir, Cowan, Lisa G., Pina, Laura R., Griswold, William G. and Hollan, James D. (2010): Enabling social interactions through real-time sketch-based communication. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 405-406. Available online

We present UbiSketch, a tool for ubiquitous real-time sketch-based communication. We describe the UbiSketch system, which enables people to create doodles, drawings, and notes with digital pens and paper and publish them quickly and easily via their mobile phones to social communication channels, such as Facebook, Twitter, and email. The natural paper-based social interaction enabled by UbiSketch has the potential to enrich current mobile communication practices.

© All rights reserved Weibel et al. and/or their publisher

 
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