Publication statistics

Pub. period:1992-2007
Pub. count:7
Number of co-authors:9



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Robert C. Page:
David L. Tate:
Tony King:

 

 

Productive colleagues

Linda E. Sibert's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Robert J. K. Jacob:57
James N. Templeman:7
Tony King:4
 
 
 

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Linda E. Sibert

Ph.D

Picture of Linda E. Sibert.
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Current place of employment:
Naval Research Laboratory

Linda E. Sibert is a computer scientist for the Immersive Simulation Section in the Information Technology Division. She has over 25 years of experience in the development and evaluation of novel interaction techniques and user interfaces, the last 20 at NRL. Her work includes research into the control structure of handheld input devices, the design and evaluation of an eye tracking interface for command and control, the evaluation of a virtual reality mission rehearsal system for shipboard firefighting, and most recently, the development and testing of user interfaces for training simulators for the Marine Corps. Ms. Sibert is active in the field of human-computer interaction. She was treasurer of Association of Computing Machinery's User Interface Software and Technology (UIST) conference for many years, is an active reviewer, and has published numerous articles and papers. Ms. Sibert received an A.B. in English from Wittenberg University in 1970, and an M.S. in computer science from George Washington University in 1988.

 

Publications by Linda E. Sibert (bibliography)

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2007
 
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Templeman, James N., Sibert, Linda E., Page, Robert C. and Denbrook, Patricia S. (2007): Pointman - A New Control for Simulating Tactical Infantry Movements. In: Sherman, William R., Lin, Ming C. and Steed, Anthony (eds.) IEEE Virtual Reality Conference, VR 2007 10-14 March, 2007, Charlotte, NC, USA. pp. 285-286. Available online

2000
 
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Sibert, Linda E. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (2000): Evaluation of Eye Gaze Interaction. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 281-288. Available online

Eye gaze interaction can provide a convenient and natural addition to user-computer dialogues. We have previously reported on our interaction techniques using eye gaze [10]. While our techniques seemed useful in demonstration, we now investigate their strengths and weaknesses in a controlled setting. In this paper, we present two experiments that compare an interaction technique we developed for object selection based on a where a person is looking with the most commonly used selection method using a mouse. We find that our eye gaze interaction technique is faster than selection with a mouse. The results show that our algorithm, which makes use of knowledge about how the eyes behave, preserves the natural quickness of the eye. Eye gaze interaction is a reasonable addition to computer interaction and is convenient in situations where it is important to use the hands for other tasks. It is particularly beneficial for the larger screen workspaces and virtual environments of the future, and it will become increasingly practical as eye tracker technology matures.

© All rights reserved Sibert and Jacob and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Templeman, James N., Denbrook, Patricia S. and Sibert, Linda E. (1999): Virtual Locomotion: Walking in Place through Virtual Environments. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 8 (6) pp. 598-617.

1997
 
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Tate, David L., Sibert, Linda E. and King, Tony (1997): Using Virtual Environments to Train Firefighters. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 17 (6) pp. 23-29. Available online

1994
 
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Jacob, Robert J. K., Sibert, Linda E., McFarlane, Daniel C. and Mullen Jr, M. Preston (1994): Integrality and Separability of Input Devices. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 1 (1) pp. 3-26. Available online

Current input device taxonomies and other frameworks typically emphasize the mechanical structure of input devices. We suggest that selecting an appropriate input device for an interactive task requires looking beyond the physical structure of devices to the deeper perceptual structure of the task, the device, and the interrelationship between the perceptual structure of the task and the control properties of the device. We affirm that perception is key to understanding performance of multidimensional input devices on multidimensional tasks. We have therefore extended the theory of processing of perceptual structure to graphical interactive tasks and to the control structure of input devices. This allows us to predict task and device combinations that lead to better performance and hypothesize that performance is improved when the perceptual structure of the task matches the control structure of the device. We conducted an experiment in which subjects performed two tasks with different perceptual structures, using two input devices with correspondingly different control structures, a three-dimensional tracker and a mouse. We analyzed both speed and accuracy, as well as the trajectories generated by subjects as they used the unconstrained three-dimensional tracker to perform each task. The results support our hypothesis and confirm the importance of matching the perceptual structure of the task and the control structure of the input device.

© All rights reserved Jacob et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jacob, Robert J. K., Sibert, Linda E., McFarlane, Daniel C. and Mullen, M. P. (1994): Integrality and Separability of Input Devices. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 1 (0) pp. 3-26.

 Cited in the following chapter:

: [Not yet published]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

: [Not yet published]


 
1992
 
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Jacob, Robert J. K. and Sibert, Linda E. (1992): The Perceptual Structure of Multidimensional Input Device Selection. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 211-218. Available online

Concepts such as the logical device, taxonomies, and other descriptive frameworks have improved understanding of input devices but ignored or else treated informally their pragmatic qualities, which are fundamental to selection of input devices for tasks. We seek the greater leverage of a predictive theoretical framework by basing our investigation of three-dimensional vs. two-dimensional input devices on Garner's theory of processing of perceptual structure in multidimensional space. We hypothesize that perceptual structure provides a key to understanding performance of multidimensional input devices on multidimensional tasks. Two three-dimensional tasks may seem equivalent, but if they involve different types of perceptual spaces, they should be assigned correspondingly different input devices. Our experiment supports this hypothesis and thus both indicates when to use three-dimensional input devices and gives credence to our theoretical basis for this indication.

© All rights reserved Jacob and Sibert and/or ACM Press

 
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