Publication statistics

Pub. period:1995-2012
Pub. count:33
Number of co-authors:40



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Kate Starbird:6
Marilyn C. Salzman:4
Sarah Vieweg:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Leysia Palen's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jonathan Grudin:105
Paul Dourish:96
Starr Roxanne Hilt..:69
 
 
 
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Leysia Palen

Ph.D

Picture of Leysia Palen.
Personal Homepage:
cs.colorado.edu/~palen/Home/Welcome.html


Current place of employment:
University of Colorado

Leysia Palen is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU). She is part of the Human-Centered Computing area, and have affiliations to other similarly-minded organizations at CU. She has worked in a variety of domains and investigated a range of topics in Human-Centered Computing. Currently and most actively, she work in the area of Crisis Informatics, which describes the intersecting trajectories of social, technical and information matters in crises and disasters. Members and affiliates of her's research group—the ConnectivITy Lab—and she are leading research that investigates the evolving role of information and communication technologies (ICT) in emergency and disaster situations, with a particular focus on information dissemination and the implications of ICT-supported public participation on informal and formal crisis response.

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Publications by Leysia Palen (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Starbird, Kate and Palen, Leysia (2012): (How) will the revolution be retweeted?: information diffusion and the 2011 Egyptian uprising. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 7-16.

This paper examines microblogging information diffusion activity during the 2011 Egyptian political uprisings. Specifically, we examine the use of the retweet mechanism on Twitter, using empirical evidence of information propagation to reveal aspects of work that the crowd conducts. Analysis of the widespread contagion of a popular meme reveals interaction between those who were "on the ground" in Cairo and those who were not. However, differences between information that appeals to the larger crowd and those who were doing on-the-ground work reveal important interplay between the two realms. Through both qualitative and statistical description, we show how the crowd expresses solidarity and does the work of information processing through recommendation and filtering. We discuss how these aspects of work mutually sustain crowd interaction in a politically sensitive context. In addition, we show how features of this retweet-recommendation behavior could be used in combination with other indicators to identify information that is new and likely coming from the ground.

© All rights reserved Starbird and Palen and/or ACM Press

 
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Mark, Gloria, Bagdouri, Mossaab, Palen, Leysia, Martin, James, Al-Ani, Ban and Anderson, Kenneth (2012): Blogs as a collective war diary. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 37-46.

Disaster-related research in human-centered computing has typically focused on the shorter-term, emergency period of a disaster event, whereas effects of some crises are long-term, lasting years. Social media archived on the Internet provides researchers the opportunity to examine societal reactions to a disaster over time. In this paper we examine how blogs written during a protracted conflict might reflect a collective view of the event. The sheer amount of data originating from the Internet about a significant event poses a challenge to researchers; we employ topic modeling and pronoun analysis as methods to analyze such large-scale data. First, we discovered that blog war topics temporally tracked the actual, measurable violence in the society suggesting that blog content can be an indicator of the health or state of the affected population. We also found that people exhibited a collective identity when they blogged about war, as evidenced by a higher use of first-person plural pronouns compared to blogging on other topics. Blogging about daily life decreased as violence in the society increased; when violence waned, there was a resurgence of daily life topics, potentially illustrating how a society returns to normalcy.

© All rights reserved Mark et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sarcevic, Aleksandra, Palen, Leysia, White, Joanne, Starbird, Kate, Bagdouri, Mossaab and Anderson, Kenneth (2012): "Beacons of hope" in decentralized coordination: learning from on-the-ground medical twitterers during the 2010 Haiti earthquake. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 47-56.

We examine the public, social media communications of 110 emergency medical response teams and organizations in the immediate aftermath of the January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake. We found the teams through an inductive analysis of Twitter communications acquired over the three-week emergency period from 89,114 Twitterers. We then analyzed the teams' Twitter streams, as well as all digital media they generated and pointed to in their streams -- blog posts, photographs, videos, status updates and field reports -- to understand the medical coordination challenges they faced from pre-deployment readiness to on-the-ground action. Here we identify opportunities for improving coordination in a decentralized and distributed environment where staffing, disease trajectories, and other circumstances rapidly change. We extrapolate from these findings to theorize about how "beaconing" behavior is a sign of latent potential for coordination upon which mechanisms of coordination can capitalize.

© All rights reserved Sarcevic et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pipek, Volkmar, Palen, Leysia and Landgren, Jonas (2012): Workshop summary: collaboration & crisis informatics (CCI'2012). In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 13-14.

Events that include the 9/11 attacks, the 2005 Hurricane Katrina or the 2011 Sendai Earthquake have drawn attention to how individuals, organizations or societies can improve crisis preparedness, resilience and recovery. In all scenarios, collaboration between professional responders, public administrations, citizens is critical to response, and needs to be further understood and explored. In this workshop we will bring together academics from various disciplines as well as reflective practitioners to discuss challenges and approaches for improving intra- and inter-organizational collaboration in crisis situations.

© All rights reserved Pipek et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Starbird, Kate and Palen, Leysia (2011): "Voluntweeters": self-organizing by digital volunteers in times of crisis. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1071-1080.

This empirical study of "digital volunteers" in the aftermath of the January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake describes their behaviors and mechanisms of self-organizing in the information space of a microblogging environment, where collaborators were newly found and distributed across continents. The paper explores the motivations, resources, activities and products of digital volunteers. It describes how seemingly small features of the technical environment offered structure for self-organizing, while considering how the social-technical milieu enabled individual capacities and collective action. Using social theory about self-organizing, the research offers insight about features of coordination within a setting of massive interaction.

© All rights reserved Starbird and Palen and/or their publisher

 
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Starbird, Kate and Palen, Leysia (2011): More than the usual suspects: the physical self and other resources for learning to program using a 3D avatar environment. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 614-621.

This paper presents results from a video-based analysis of non-programmers' use of a new platform for end-user programming, the 3D Avatar Programming System (3DAPS). We use micro-ethnographic analytic methods to understand how learning about programming occurs. We discuss how the management of internal and external cognitive representations of 3D movement information leverages existing, embodied knowledge to unravel less familiar knowledge -- that of programmatic instruction. In other words, the 3D movement serves as the language of translation between the representations to support learning. We also examine how shared code is used as an educational resource in a learning environment without a teacher.

© All rights reserved Starbird and Palen and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Vieweg, Sarah, Hughes, Amanda L., Starbird, Kate and Palen, Leysia (2010): Microblogging during two natural hazards events: what twitter may contribute to situational awareness. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1079-1088.

We analyze microblog posts generated during two recent, concurrent emergency events in North America via Twitter, a popular microblogging service. We focus on communications broadcast by people who were "on the ground" during the Oklahoma Grassfires of April 2009 and the Red River Floods that occurred in March and April 2009, and identify information that may contribute to enhancing situational awareness (SA). This work aims to inform next steps for extracting useful, relevant information during emergencies using information extraction (IE) techniques.

© All rights reserved Vieweg et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Starbird, Kate, Palen, Leysia, Hughes, Amanda L. and Vieweg, Sarah (2010): Chatter on the red: what hazards threat reveals about the social life of microblogged information. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 241-250.

This paper considers a subset of the computer-mediated communication (CMC) that took place during the flooding of the Red River Valley in the US and Canada in March and April 2009. Focusing on the use of Twitter, a microblogging service, we identified mechanisms of information production, distribution, and organization. The Red River event resulted in a rapid generation of Twitter communications by numerous sources using a variety of communications forms, including autobiographical and mainstream media reporting, among other types. We examine the social life of microblogged information, identifying generative, synthetic, derivative and innovative properties that sustain the broader system of interaction. The landscape of Twitter is such that the production of new information is supported through derivative activities of directing, relaying, synthesizing, and redistributing, and is additionally complemented by socio-technical innovation. These activities comprise self-organization of information.

© All rights reserved Starbird et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Giaccardi, Elisa and Palen, Leysia (2008): The Social Production of Heritage Through Cross-Media Interaction: Making Place for Place-Making. In International Journal of Heritage Studies, 14 (3) pp. 282-298.

The living relationship between intangible and tangible forms of heritage, as well as natural and cultural heritage, is a situated one, always in place. Information and communications technology (ICT) is opening up new ways of experiencing and thinking about heritage by allowing for cross-media interaction. By combining different media and technologies, cross-media interaction supports the social production of heritage and creates ‘infrastructures' that act as places of cultural production and lasting values at the service of a living heritage practice.

© All rights reserved Giaccardi and Palen and/or Routledge

 
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Palen, Leysia and Vieweg, Sarah (2008): The emergence of online widescale interaction in unexpected events: assistance, alliance & retreat. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 117-126.

This paper examines online, widescale interaction during an emergency event of national interest. Widescale interaction describes the potential for broad, immediate, and varied participation that the conditions of online forums, and social networking sites in particular, increasingly allow. Here, we examine a group on a popular social networking site as a virtual destination in the aftermath of the Northern Illinois University (NIU) shootings of February 14, 2008 in relation to related activity that happened in response to the Virginia Tech (VT) tragedy 10 months earlier. We consider features of interactions that are enabled when a vast audience converges under such conditions. We discuss how commiseration and information seeking are interrelated, and how geographical communities that share a common experience ally in such a public, online setting.

© All rights reserved Palen and Vieweg and/or ACM Press

 
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Shklovski, Irina, Palen, Leysia and Sutton, Jeannette (2008): Finding community through information and communication technology in disaster response. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 127-136.

Disasters affect not only the welfare of individuals and family groups, but also the well-being of communities, and can serve as a catalyst for innovative uses of information and communication technology (ICT). In this paper, we present evidence of ICT use for re-orientation toward the community and for the production of public goods in the form of information dissemination during disasters. Results from this study of information seeking practices by members of the public during the October 2007 Southern California wildfires suggest that ICT use provides a means for communicating community-relevant information especially when members become geographically dispersed, leveraging and even building community resources in the process. In the presence of pervasive ICT, people are developing new practices for emergency response by using ICT to address problems that arise from information dearth and geographical dispersion. In doing so, they find community by reconnecting with others who share their concern for the locale threatened by the hazard.

© All rights reserved Shklovski et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sanusi, Alena and Palen, Leysia (2008): Of Coffee Shops and Parking Lots: Considering Matters of Space and Place in the Use of Public Wi-Fi. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (2) pp. 257-273.

Wireless local area networks -- or Wi-Fi networks -- are proliferating in some societies. Our interest in this exploratory essay is to illustrate how ostensibly free, publicly-accessible Wi-Fi requires users to apply conventional understandings of space and place (particularly commercial spaces and places) as they make sense of some ambiguities about proper use in those places. We show, through an examination of the metaphorical terms used to describe Wi-Fi, how spatial notions are employed in an attempt to define ownership of the signal and rights to its use. We consider how place-behaviors require evaluation of legitimacy of users in public places and of hospitality of Wi-Fi providers. We observe that commercial interests underpin notions of ownership, legitimacy and hospitality of social actors in public places like coffee shops and parking lots. As researchers considering matters of participation in virtual places, we must first have some appreciation for the normative constraints and conventions that govern the commercial public places in which users access "free" Wi-Fi.

© All rights reserved Sanusi and Palen and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Sanusi, Alena and Palen, Leysia (2008): Of Coffee Shops and Parking Lots: Considering Matters of Space and Place in the Use of Public Wi-Fi. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (2) pp. 257-273.

Wireless local area networks -- or Wi-Fi networks -- are proliferating in some societies. Our interest in this exploratory essay is to illustrate how ostensibly free, publicly-accessible Wi-Fi requires users to apply conventional understandings of space and place (particularly commercial spaces and places) as they make sense of some ambiguities about proper use in those places. We show, through an examination of the metaphorical terms used to describe Wi-Fi, how spatial notions are employed in an attempt to define ownership of the signal and rights to its use. We consider how place-behaviors require evaluation of legitimacy of users in public places and of hospitality of Wi-Fi providers. We observe that commercial interests underpin notions of ownership, legitimacy and hospitality of social actors in public places like coffee shops and parking lots. As researchers considering matters of participation in virtual places, we must first have some appreciation for the normative constraints and conventions that govern the commercial public places in which users access "free" Wi-Fi.

© All rights reserved Sanusi and Palen and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

2007
 
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Palen, Leysia and Liu, Sophia B. (2007): Citizen communications in crisis: anticipating a future of ICT-supported public participation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 727-736.

Recent world-wide crisis events have drawn new attention to the role information communication technology (ICT) can play in warning and response activities. Drawing on disaster social science, we consider a critical aspect of post-impact disaster response that does not yet receive much information science research attention. Public participation is an emerging, large-scale arena for computer-mediated interaction that has implications for both informal and formal response. With a focus on persistent citizen communications as one form of interaction in this arena, we describe their spatial and temporal arrangements, and how the emerging information pathways that result serve different post-impact functions. However, command-and-control models do not easily adapt to the expanding data-generating and -seeking activities by the public. ICT in disaster contexts will give further rise to improvised activities and temporary organizations with which formal response organizations need to align.

© All rights reserved Palen and Liu and/or ACM Press

 
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Palen, Leysia and Hughes, Amanda (2007): When home base is not a place: parents' use of mobile telephones. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 11 (5) pp. 339-348.

 
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Palen, Leysia, Hiltz, Starr Roxanne and Liu, Sophia B. (2007): Online forums supporting grassroots participation in emergency preparedness and response. In Communications of the ACM, 50 (3) pp. 54-58.

2006
 
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Kristensen, Margit, Kyng, Morten and Palen, Leysia (2006): Participatory design in emergency medical service: designing for future practice. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 161-170.

We describe our research -- its approach, results and products -- on Danish emergency medical service (EMS) field or "pre-hospital" work in minor and major incidents. We discuss how commitments to participatory design and attention to the qualitative differences between minor and major incidents address challenges identified by disaster sociologists when designing for major incidents. Through qualitative research and participatory design, we have examined the features of EMS work and technology use in different emergency situations from the perspective of multiple actors. We conceptualize victims in incidents -- and particularly in major incidents, where on-site medical assessments is highly incomplete -- as boundary objects over which the complex and imperfect work of coordination is done. As an outcome of our participatory design approach, we describe a set of designs in support of future EMS work.

© All rights reserved Kristensen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Palen, Leysia and Aalokke, Stinne (2006): Of pill boxes and piano benches: "home-made" methods for managing medication. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 79-88.

We report on the results of an ethnographic study of how elders manage their medication with the objective of informing the design of in-home assistive health technology to support "medication adherence." We describe the methods by which elders organize and remember to take their medication-methods that leverage a kind of distributed cognition. Elders devise medication management systems that rely on the spatial features of their homes, the temporal rhythms of their days, as well as the routines that occasion these places and times to help recall and prospective remembering. We show how mobile health care workers participate in the development and execution of these systems, and "read" them to infer an elder's state of health and ability to manage medication. From this analysis, we present five principles for the design of assistive technology that support the enhanced but ongoing use of personalized medication management systems, and that also allow for remote health care assistance as it becomes needed.

© All rights reserved Palen and Aalokke and/or ACM Press

 
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Grinter, Rebecca E., Palen, Leysia and Eldridge, Margery (2006): Chatting with teenagers: Considering the place of chat technologies in teen life. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 13 (4) pp. 423-447.

In the last few years, teenagers have been on the forefront of adopting short message service (SMS), a mobile phone-based text messaging system, and instant messaging (IM), a computer-based text chat system. However, while teenage adoption of SMS had led to a series of studies examining the reasons for its popularity, IM use in the teenage population remains understudied. This omission becomes significant given the increasing interest in domestic computing among human-computer interaction (HCI) and computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) researchers. Further, because of the dearth of empirical work on teenage use of IM, we find that IM and SMS are sometimes incorrectly assumed to share the same features of use. To address these concerns, we revisit our own studies of SMS and IM use and reexamine them in tandem with other published studies on teenage chat. We consider similarities and differences in styles of SMS and IM use and how chat technologies enable the pursuit of teenage independence. We examine how differences are born out of technological differences and financial cost structures. We discuss how SMS and IM are used in concert to provide increased awareness and to coordinate inter-household communications, and how privacy is regulated within the individual household as a means of maintaining these communications.

© All rights reserved Grinter et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Palen, Leysia, Swan, Laurel and Taylor, Alex S. (2005): Designs for home life. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 2035-2036.

In this Special Interest Group (SIG) we intend to consider the increasingly popular area of interactive systems design for the home. Aiming to incorporate a wide range of perspectives, the SIG's participants will map out the growing number of research and development programs in the area. Particular emphasis will be given to how home life has been characterized in various programmatic visions and how the CHI community might best capitalize on these characterizations. The importance of an understanding of home life to inform design and future directions in this area will also be reflected on. This SIG is intended to appeal to a broad cross section of the CHI community, ranging from practitioners and developers to computer and social scientists.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

2003
 
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Palen, Leysia and Dourish, Paul (2003): Unpacking "privacy" for a networked world. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 129-136.

2002
 
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Grinter, Rebecca E. and Palen, Leysia (2002): Instant messaging in teen life. In: Churchill, Elizabeth F., McCarthy, Joe, Neuwirth, Christine and Rodden, Tom (eds.) Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. pp. 21-30.

Instant Messaging (IM) is being widely adopted by teenagers. In a study of 16 teenage IM users, we explore IM as an emerging feature of teen life, focusing our questions on its support of interpersonal communication and its role and salience in everyday life. We qualitatively describe the teens' IM use interpersonally, as well as its place in the domestic ecology. We also identify technology adoption conditions and discuss behaviors around privacy management. In this initial investigation, we found differences in the nature of use between high school and college teens, differences we propose are accounted for by teens' degree of autonomy as a function of domestic and scholastic obligations, the development of independent work practices, Internet connectivity access, and even transportation access. Moreover, while teen IM use is in part characterized as an optimizing choice between multiple communications media, practice is also tied to concerns around peer pressure, peer group membership and creating additional opportunities to socialize.

© All rights reserved Grinter and Palen and/or ACM Press

 
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Palen, Leysia and Salzman, Marilyn C. (2002): Voice-mail diary studies for naturalistic data capture under mobile conditions. In: Churchill, Elizabeth F., McCarthy, Joe, Neuwirth, Christine and Rodden, Tom (eds.) Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. pp. 87-95.

Mobile technology requires new methods for studying its use under realistic conditions "in the field." Reflexively, mobile technology also creates new opportunities for data collection while participants are remotely located. We report on our experiences with a variation on the paper-based diary study technique, which we extend by using voice-mail paired with mobile and landline telephony to more easily collect data in natural situations. We discuss lessons learned from experiences with voice-mail diary studies in two investigations of different scope. We also present suggestions for tailoring the technique to different research objectives, garnering high subject participation, and configuring the voice-mail system for data collection.

© All rights reserved Palen and Salzman and/or ACM Press

 
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Palen, Leysia and Salzman, Marilyn C. (2002): Beyond the handset: designing for wireless communications usability. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 9 (2) pp. 125-151.

Service-based wireless devices like wireless telephones require users to interact with aspects of the technology beyond the hardware and software of the handset. By entering into contractual relationships with service-providers, and by using network-based services, users interact with a larger system -- one that has social and technological components. The operation of the wireless telephone requires the assimilation of heterogeneous sources of information from the device manufacturer, sales people, customer service representatives, marketing people, and members of the popular media, among others, which can easily confound users' understanding of this new class of technology. Opportunities for usability problems therefore scale beyond the handset, as do opportunities for better design. We report the results of a study of 19 novice wireless phone users who were closely tracked for the first 6 weeks after service acquisition. Taking a technology-as-system analytical approach, we describe the wireless telephony system as four socio-technical components: hardware, software, "netware," and "bizware." This particular organization of the system is intended for the practical application of designing for usability.

© All rights reserved Palen and Salzman and/or ACM Press

 
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Palen, Leysia (2002): Mobile telephony in a connected life. In Communications of the ACM, 45 (3) pp. 78-82.

2001
 
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Palen, Leysia, Salzman, Marilyn C. and Youngs, Ed (2001): Discovery and Integration of Mobile Communications in Everyday Life. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5 (2) pp. 109-122.

2000
 
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Palen, Leysia, Salzman, Marilyn C. and Youngs, Ed (2000): Going Wireless: Behavior & Practice of New Mobile Phone Users. In: Kellogg, Wendy A. and Whittaker, Steve (eds.) Proceedings of the 2000 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work 2000, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. pp. 201-210.

We report on the results of a study in which 19 new mobile phone users were closely tracked for the first six weeks after service acquisition. Results show that new users tend to rapidly modify their perceptions of social appropriateness around mobile phone use, that actual nature of use frequently differs from what users initially predict, and that comprehension of service-oriented technologies can be problematic. We describe instances and features of mobile telephony practice. When in use, mobile phones occupy multiple social spaces simultaneously, spaces with norms that sometimes conflict: the physical space of the mobile phone user and the virtual space of the conversation.

© All rights reserved Palen et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
1999
 
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Palen, Leysia (1999): Social, Individual & Technological Issues for Groupware Calendar Systems. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 17-24.

Designing and deploying groupware is difficult. Groupware evaluation and design are often approached from a single perspective, with a technologically-, individually-, or socially-centered focus. A study of Groupware Calendar Systems (GCSs) highlights the need for a synthesis of these multiple perspectives to fully understand the adoption challenges these systems face. First, GCSs often replace existing calendar artifacts, which can impact users' calendaring habits and in turn influence technology adoption decisions. Second, electronic calendars have the potential to easily share contextualized information publicly over the computer network, creating opportunities for peer judgment about time allocation and raising concerns about privacy regulation. However, this situation may also support coordination by allowing others to make useful inferences about one's schedule. Third, the technology and the social environment are in a reciprocal, co-evolutionary relationship: the use context is affected by the constraints and affordances of the technology, and the technology also co-adapts to the environment in important ways. Finally, GCSs, despite being below the horizon of everyday notice, can affect the nature of temporal coordination beyond the expected meeting scheduling practice.

© All rights reserved Palen and/or ACM Press

 
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Palen, Leysia (1999): Social, individual and technological issues for groupware calendar systems. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, USA. pp. 17-24.

Designing and deploying groupware is difficult. Groupware evaluation and design are often approached from a single perspective, with a technologically-, individually-, or socially-centered focus. A study of Groupware Calendar Systems (GCSs) highlights the need for a synthesis of these multiple perspectives to fully understand the adoption challenges these systems face. First, GCSs often replace existing calendar artifacts, which can impact users’ calendaring habits and in turn influence technology adoption decisions. Second, electronic calendars have the potential to easily share contextualized information publicly over the computer network, creating opportunities for peer judgment about time allocation and raising concerns about privacy regulation. However, this situation may also support coordination by allowing others to make useful inferences about one’s schedule. Third, the technology and the social environment are in a reciprocal, co-evolutionary relationship: the use context is affected by the constraints and affordances of the technology, and the technology also co-adapts to the environment in important ways. Finally, GCSs, despite being below the horizon of everyday notice, can affect the nature of temporal coordination beyond the expected meeting scheduling practice.

© All rights reserved Palen and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Semi-structured qualitative studies: [/encyclopedia/semi-structured_qualitative_studies.html]


 
1998
 
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Haag, Zsolt and Palen, Leysia (1998): ECSCW'97 Doctoral Colloquium. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (1) pp. 11-12.

1997
 
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Moran, Thomas P., Palen, Leysia, Harrison, Steve, Chiu, Patrick, Kimberg, Daniel Y., Minneman, Scott, Melle, William van and Zellweger, Polle T. (1997): "I'll Get That Off the Audio": A Case Study of Salvaging Multimedia Meeting Records. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 202-209.

We describe a case study of a complex, ongoing, collaborative work process, where the central activity is a series of meetings reviewing a wide range of subtle technical topics. The problem is the accurate reporting of the results of these meetings, which is the responsibility of a single person, who is not well-versed in all the topics. We provided tools to capture the meeting discussions and tools to "salvage" the captured multimedia recordings. Salvaging is a new kind of activity involving replaying, extracting, organizing, and writing. We observed a year of mature salvaging work in the case study. From this we describe the nature of salvage work (the constituent activities, the use of the workspace, the affordances of the audio medium, how practices develop and differentiate, how the content material affects practice). We also demonstrate how this work relates to the larger work processes (the task demands of the setting, the interplay of salvage with capture, the influence on the people being reported on and reported to). Salvaging tools are shown to be valuable for dealing with free-flowing discussions of complex subject matter and for producing high quality documentation.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Ackerman, Mark S. and Palen, Leysia (1996): The Zephyr Help Instance: Promoting Ongoing Activity in a CSCW System. In: Tauber, Michael J., Bellotti, Victoria, Jeffries, Robin, Mackinlay, Jock D. and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 96 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1996, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 268-275.

If Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) systems are to be successful over time, it will be necessary to promote ongoing and continuing activity, not just initial adoption. In this paper, we consider what technical and social affordances are required to encourage the continued use of a CSCW system. To explore these issues, we examine a chat-like system, the Zephyr Help Instance, which is used extensively at MIT. The Help Instance facilitates users asking questions of one another, and is an example of a distributed help and problem-solving system. We provide an overview of the system's use as well as those mechanisms, both technical and social, that facilitate continuing its use over time.

© All rights reserved Ackerman and and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Grudin, Jonathan and Palen, Leysia (1995): Why Groupware Succeeds: Discretion or Mandate?. In: Marmolin, Hans, Sundblad, Yngve and Schmidt, Kjeld (eds.) ECSCW 95 - Proceedings of the Fourth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 11-15 September, 1995, Stockholm, Sweden. pp. 263-278.

Single-user applications are designed with a 'discretionary use' model. In contrast, for large systems, upper management support is considered crucial to adoption. Which applies to groupware? The relatively low cost of groupware reduces high-level visibility, but some argue that social dynamics will force mandated use -- the large system approach. Interview studies of recently adopted on-line meeting schedulers in two large organizations found successful, near-universal use achieved without managerial mandate. Versatile functionality and ease of use associated with discretionary products appeared to be factors leading to adoption. Other factors included organization-wide infrastructure and substantial peer pressure that developed over time.

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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/leysia_palen.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1995-2012
Pub. count:33
Number of co-authors:40



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Kate Starbird:6
Marilyn C. Salzman:4
Sarah Vieweg:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Leysia Palen's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jonathan Grudin:105
Paul Dourish:96
Starr Roxanne Hilt..:69
 
 
 
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