Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2012
Pub. count:21
Number of co-authors:33



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Elizabeth F. Churchill:11
Laurent Denoue:4
Tomas Sokoler:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Les Nelson's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Elizabeth F. Churc..:58
Peter Pirolli:46
Andreas Girgensohn:46
 
 
 

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Les Nelson

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Publications by Les Nelson (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Hanrahan, Benjamin V., Convertino, Gregorio and Nelson, Les (2012): Modeling problem difficulty and expertise in StackOverflow. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 91-94.

Supporting expert communities is becoming a 'must-have' capability whenever users are helping each other solve problems. Examples of these expert communities abound in the form of enthusiast communities, both inside and outside of organizations. In order to achieve success, these systems have to connect several different actors. In this paper we aim to inform the design of these Hybrid Intelligence Systems through the investigation of StackOverflow. Our focus in this paper is to develop indicators for hard problems and experts. The long-term goal of our study is to examine how complex problems are handled and dispatched across multiple experts. We outline implications for modeling these attributes and how they might inform better design in the future.

© All rights reserved Hanrahan et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Yee, Nick, Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Nelson, Les and Likarish, Peter (2011): Introverted elves & conscientious gnomes: the expression of personality in World of Warcraft. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 753-762.

Personality inference can be used for dynamic personalization of content or system customization. In this study, we examined whether and how personality is expressed in Virtual Worlds (VWs). Survey data from 1,040 World of Warcraft players containing demographic and personality variables was paired with their VW behavioral metrics over a four-month period. Many behavioral cues in VWs were found to be related to personality. For example, Extraverts prefer group activities over solo activities. We also found that these behavioral indicators can be used to infer a player's personality.

© All rights reserved Yee et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Yee, Nick, Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Yao, Mike and Nelson, Les (2011): Do men heal more when in drag?: conflicting identity cues between user and avatar. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 773-776.

Studies in the Proteus Effect have shown that users conform to stereotypes associated with their avatar's appearance. In this study, we used longitudinal behavioral data from 1,040 users in a virtual world to examine the behavioral outcome of conflicting gender cues between user and avatar. We found that virtual gender had a significant effect on in-game behaviors for both healing and player-vs-player activity.

© All rights reserved Yee et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Chen, Jilin, Nairn, Rowan, Nelson, Les, Bernstein, Michael and Chi, Ed H. (2010): Short and tweet: experiments on recommending content from information streams. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1185-1194.

More and more web users keep up with newest information through information streams such as the popular micro-blogging website Twitter. In this paper we studied content recommendation on Twitter to better direct user attention. In a modular approach, we explored three separate dimensions in designing such a recommender: content sources, topic interest models for users, and social voting. We implemented 12 recommendation engines in the design space we formulated, and deployed them to a recommender service on the web to gather feedback from real Twitter users. The best performing algorithm improved the

© All rights reserved Chen et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Nelson, Les, Held, Christoph, Pirolli, Peter, Hong, Lichan, Schiano, Diane and Chi, Ed H. (2009): With a little help from my friends: examining the impact of social annotations in sensemaking tasks. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1795-1798.

In prior work we reported on the design of a social annotation system, SparTag.us, for use in sensemaking activities such as work-group reading and report writing. Previous studies of note-taking systems have demonstrated behavioral differences in social annotation practices, but are not clear in the actual performance gains provided by social features. This paper presents a laboratory study aimed at evaluating the learning effect of social features in SparTag.us. We found significant learning gains, and consider implications for design and for understanding the underlying mechanisms in play when people use social annotation systems.

© All rights reserved Nelson et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Nelson, Les, Smetters, Diana and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2008): Keyholes: selective sharing in close collaboration. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2443-2452.

Documents are changing, becoming more malleable. Content operations progress, from command lines to annotation and tagging. Our studies reveal that people in practice share entire documents when portions would suffice. Readers hunt for relevant information. Authors describe laborious processes of selective sharing and redaction. Overload and loss of focus arises. We describe Keyholes, content annotations where authors or readers enter meta-data within a document to indicate what gets shared, with whom, and why. We argue that leveraging established practices (tags, social annotation, and command-line automation) clashes with CHI notions of technical contribution, but creates new social dynamism within document texts.

© All rights reserved Nelson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Nelson, Les and Smetters, Diana K. (2008): Useful Computer Security. In IEEE Internet Computing, 12 (3) pp. 10-12.

 
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Hong, Lichan, Chi, Ed H., Budiu, Raluca, Pirolli, Peter and Nelson, Les (2008): SparTag.us: a low cost tagging system for foraging of web content. In: Levialdi, Stefano (ed.) AVI 2008 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces May 28-30, 2008, Napoli, Italy. pp. 65-72.

2007
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Nelson, Les (2007): Interactive Community Bulletin Boards as Conversational Hubs and Sites for Playful Visual Repartee. In: HICSS 2007 - 40th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 3-6 January, 2007, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 76.

2004
 
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Yamada, Toshiya, Shingu, Jun, Churchill, Elizabeth F., Nelson, Les, Helfman, Jonathan and Murphy, Paul (2004): Who cares?: reflecting who is reading what on distributed community bulletin boards. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 109-118.

In this paper, we describe the YeTi information sharing system that has been designed to foster community building through informal digital content sharing. The YeTi system is a general information parsing, hosting and distribution infrastructure, with interfaces designed for individual and public content reading. In this paper we describe the YeTi public display interface, with a particular focus on tools we have designed to provide lightweight awareness of others\' interactions with posted content. Our tools augment content with metadata that reflect people\'s reading of content - captured video clips of who\'s reading and interacting with content, tools to allow people to leave explicit freehand annotations about content, and a visualization of the content access history to show when content is interacted with. Results from an initial evaluation are presented and discussed.

© All rights reserved Yamada et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Nelson, Les, Denoue, Laurent, Helfman, Jonathan and Murphy, Paul (2004): Sharing multimedia content with interactive public displays: a case study. In: Proceedings of DIS04: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2004. pp. 7-16.

Plasma Posters are large screen, digital, interactive poster-boards situated in public spaces, designed to facilitate informal content sharing within teams, groups, organizations and communities. While interest in interactive community poster boards has grown recently, few successful examples have been reported. In this paper we describe an ongoing installation of Plasma Posters within our organization, and report qualitative and quantitative data from 20 months of use showing the Posters have become an integral part of information sharing, complementing email and Web-based sharing. Success factors include our design process, the reliability and flexibility of the technology and the social setting of our organization. We briefly describe three external installations of the Plasma Poster Network in public places. We then reflect on content posting as "information staging" and the ways in which the public space itself becomes part of the "interface" to content.

© All rights reserved Churchill et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Girgensohn, Andreas, Nelson, Les and Lee, Alison (2004): Blending digital and physical spaces for ubiquitous community participation. In Communications of the ACM, 47 (2) pp. 38-44.

2003
 
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Denoue, Laurent, Nelson, Les and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2003): A fast, interactive 3D paper-flier metaphor for digital bulletin boards. In: Proceedings of the 16th annural ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology November, 2-5, 2003, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 169-172.

 
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Nelson, Les, Denoue, Laurent and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2003): AttrActive windows: active windows for pervasive computing applications. In: Johnson, Lewis and Andre, Elisabeth (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2003 January 12-15, 2003, Miami, Florida, USA. p. 326.

We introduce the AttrActive Windows user interface, a novel approach for presenting interactive content on large screen, interactive, digital, bulletin boards. Moving away from the desktop metaphor, AttrActive Windows are dynamic, non-uniform windows that can appear in different orientations and have autonomous behaviours to attract passers-by and invite interactions.

© All rights reserved Nelson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Nelson, Les, Denoue, Laurent and Girgensohn, Andreas (2003): The Plasma Poster Network: Posting Multimedia Content in Public Places. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 599.

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Girgensohn, Andreas, Nelson, Les and Lee, Alison (2003): Weaving Between Online & Offline Community Participation. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 729.

2002
 
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Sokoler, Tomas, Nelson, Les and Pedersen, Elin Rnby (2002): Low-Resolution Supplementary Tactile Cues for Navigational Assistance. In: Paterno, Fabio (ed.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - 4th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2002 September 18-20, 2002, Pisa, Italy. pp. 369-372.

2001
 
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Nelson, Les, Bly, Sara A. and Sokoler, Tomas (2001): Quiet Calls: Talking Silently on Mobile Phones. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 174-181.

Quiet Calls is a technology allowing mobile telephone users to respond to telephone conversations without talking aloud. QC-Hold, a Quiet Calls prototype, combines three buttons for responding to calls with a PDA/mobile phone unit to silently send pre-recorded audio directly into the phone. This permits a mixed-mode communication where callers in public settings use a quiet means of communication, and other callers experience a voice telephone call. An evaluation of QC-Hold shows that it is easily used and suggests ways in which Quiet Calls offers a new form of communication, extending the choices offered by synchronous phone calling and asynchronous voicemail.

© All rights reserved Nelson et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Trevor, Jonathan, Bly, Sara A., Nelson, Les and Cubranic, Davor (2000): Anchored Conversations: Chatting in the Context of a Document. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 454-461.

This paper describes an application-independent tool called Anchored Conversations that brings together text-based conversations and documents. The design of Anchored Conversations is based on our observations of the use of documents and text chats in collaborative settings. We observed that chat spaces support work conversations, but they do not allow the close integration of conversations with work documents that can be seen when people are working together face-to-face. Anchored Conversations directly addresses this problem by allowing text chats to be anchored into documents. Anchored Conversations also facilitates document sharing; accepting an invitation to an anchored conversation results in the document being automatically uploaded. In addition, Anchored Conversations provides support for review, catch-up and asynchronous communications through a database. In this paper we describe motivating fieldwork, the design of Anchored Conversations, a scenario of use, and some preliminary results from a user study.

© All rights reserved Churchill et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pedersen, Elin Ronby, Sokoler, Tomas and Nelson, Les (2000): PaperButtons: Expanding a Tangible User Interface. In: Proceedings of DIS00: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2000. pp. 216-223.

Expanding the functionality of a successful system is always a challenge; the initial simplicity and ease-of-use is easily lost in the process. Experience indicates that this problem is worsened in systems with tangible interfaces: while it might be relatively easy to suggest a single successful tangible interaction component, it is notoriously hard to preserve the success when expanding with more components or more manipulation using the same component. This paper describes our approach to creating and expanding tangible interfaces. The approach consist of adherence to a set of guidelines for tangible interfaces, derived from practical tangible design and general object-oriented design, and solicitation of user requirements to the particular interaction method in question. Finally the paper describes a prototype of PaperButtons built in response to these requirements and designed in accordance to the guidelines for tangible interfaces.

© All rights reserved Pedersen et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Nelson, Les, Ichimura, Satoshi, Pedersen, Elin Ronby and Adams, Lia (1999): Palette: A Paper Interface for Giving Presentations. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 354-361.

The Palette is a digital appliance designed for intuitive control of electronic slide shows. Current interfaces demand too much of our attention to permit effective computer use in situations where we can not give the technology our fullest concentration. The Palette uses index cards that are printed with slide content that is easily identified by both humans and computers. The presenter controls the presentation by directly manipulating the cards. The Palette design is based on our observation of presentations given in a real work setting. Our experiences using the system are described, including new practices (e.g., collaborative presentation, enhanced notetaking) that arise from the affordances of this new approach. This system is an example of a new interaction paradigm called tacit interaction that supports users who can spare very little attention to a computer interface.

© All rights reserved Nelson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

03 Apr 2012: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
17 Aug 2009: Modified
17 Jun 2009: Modified
13 Jun 2009: Modified
02 Jun 2009: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
24 Jul 2007: Modified
24 Jul 2007: Modified
22 Jun 2007: Modified
22 Jun 2007: Modified
11 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/les_nelson.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2012
Pub. count:21
Number of co-authors:33



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Elizabeth F. Churchill:11
Laurent Denoue:4
Tomas Sokoler:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Les Nelson's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Elizabeth F. Churc..:58
Peter Pirolli:46
Andreas Girgensohn:46
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
92% booked. Starts in 3 days
go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
91% booked. Starts in 4 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading