Publication statistics

Pub. period:1990-2012
Pub. count:5
Number of co-authors:15



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Douglas J. Gillan:2
Laura Magee:2
Marianne Rudisill:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Kritina Holden's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Douglas J. Gillan:31
S. Camille Peres:13
Marianne Rudisill:11
 
 
 

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Kritina Holden

 

Publications by Kritina Holden (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
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Bartha, Michael C., Peres, S. Camille, Harper, Christy, Holden, Kritina, Meingast, Melissa, Muddimer, Andrew and Smith, Danielle (2012): Incorporating industry goals into academic programs: A case study of a successful effort. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2012 Annual Meeting 2012. pp. 571-575. Available online

The need for trained Human Factors and Ergonomics (HF/E) professionals has increased remarkably over the last few years. The skill sets these professionals need to have vary by industry and changes over time. However, current employers of HF/E new-hires have repeatedly indicated that students are not getting sufficient training and preparation for their positions. This panel will present a case study of how a newly developed program integrated the needs of industry into the academic requirements of the program. Further, the question and discussion part of the panel session will focus on developing a guideline for other programs to utilize to integrate the needs of industry into their academic programs.

© All rights reserved Bartha et al. and/or Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

2011
 
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Thompson, Shelby, Holden, Kritina, England, Scott and Benson, Elizabeth (2011): The Effect of Pressurized Space Gloves on Operability of Cursor Controls, Mobility, and Strength. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting 2011. pp. 1587-1591. Available online

Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) researchers at Johnson Space Center (JSC), in collaboration with the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Suit Team, performed a glove box study investigating operability of cursor controls, mobility, and strength of the participants while wearing pressurized gloves. Performance time was collected under a range of glove pressures (0, 0.8, 4.3, 6.3, and 8.1 psid), as well as bare-handed. Controls tested included a Castle switch, Rocker switch, and Trackball. The study was undertaken to determine impacts of operating controls under higher than nominal (i.e., > 4.3 psid) suit pressures. Operability when using cursor control devices was tested with an interactive software task representative of the types of actions that will be required to interact with space vehicle displays (display navigation and selection of a target). Results indicate that cursor control devices can be operated at pressures up to 8.1 psid, albeit with some difficulty. With respect to mobility, increased pressure seemed to affect thumb mobility more than the fingers. As the number of participants was limited in this initial feasibility study, further studies should be performed with a larger number of participants to evaluate performance with different hand/glove sizes, as well as with alternative device designs that are more ergonomically flexible and forgiving of hand and finger dimension changes brought on by increases in pressure. Results from this study may have implications for other gloved task environments.

© All rights reserved Thompson et al. and/or HFES

2003
 
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Lidwell, William, Holden, Kritina and Butler, Jill (2003): Universal Principles of Design: 100 Ways to Enhance Usability, Influence Perception, Increase Appeal, Make Better Design Decisions. 5th ed. Rockport Publishers

 Cited in the following chapter:

Chunking: [/encyclopedia/chunking.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Chunking: [/encyclopedia/chunking.html]


 
1992
 
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Gillan, Douglas J., Holden, Kritina, Adam, Susan, Rudisill, Marianne and Magee, Laura (1992): How Should Fitts' Law be Applied to Human-Computer Interaction?. In Interacting with Computers, 4 (3) pp. 289-313.

The paper challenges the notion that any Fitts' Law model can be applied generally to human computer interaction, and proposes instead that applying Fitts' Law requires knowledge of the users' sequence of movements, direction of movement, and typical movement amplitudes as well as target sizes. Two experiments examined a text selection task with sequences of controlled movements (point-click and point-drag). For the point-click sequence, a Fitts' Law model that used the diagonal across the text object in the direction of pointing (rather than the horizontal extent of the text object) as the target size provided the best fit for the pointing time data, whereas for the point-drag sequence, a Fitts' Law model that used the vertical size of the text object as the target size gave the best fit. Dragging times were fitted well by Fitts' Law models that used either the vertical or horizontal size of the terminal character in the text object. Additional results of note were that pointing in the point-click sequence was consistently faster than in the point-drag sequence, and that pointing in either sequence was consistently faster than dragging. The discussion centres around the need to define task characteristics before applying Fitts' Law to an interface design or analysis, analyses of pointing and of dragging, and implications for interface design.

© All rights reserved Gillan et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 Cited in the following chapter:

Fitts's Law: [/encyclopedia/fitts_law.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Fitts's Law: [/encyclopedia/fitts_law.html]


 
1990
 
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Gillan, Douglas J., Holden, Kritina, Adam, Susan, Rudisill, Marianne and Magee, Laura (1990): How Does Fitts' Law Fit Pointing and Dragging?. In: Carrasco, Jane and Whiteside, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 90 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference 1990, Seattle, Washington,USA. pp. 227-234.

Two experiments examined selecting text using a movement sequence of pointing and dragging. Experiment 1 showed that, in the Point-Drag sequence, the pointing time was related to the pointing distance but not to the width of the text to be selected; in contrast, pointing time was related to both the pointing distance and the width of the text in the Point-Click sequence. Experiment 2 demonstrated that both the pointing and dragging times for the Point-Drag sequence were sensitive to the height of the text that was selected. The discussion of the results centers around the application of Fitts' Law to pointing and dragging in a point-drag sequence, proposing that the target for pointing is the leftmost edge of the text to be selected, and the target for dragging is the rightmost edge of the text.

© All rights reserved Gillan et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Fitts's Law: [/encyclopedia/fitts_law.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Fitts's Law: [/encyclopedia/fitts_law.html]


 
 
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