Publication statistics

Pub. period:1993-2012
Pub. count:58
Number of co-authors:81



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gerd Andersson:9
Ana Paiva:8
Anna Ståhl:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

Kristina Höök's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Paul Dourish:96
Jodi Forlizzi:90
Antti Oulasvirta:57
 
 
 
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Kristina Höök

Professor

Picture of Kristina Höök.
Has also published under the name of:
"Kristina Hook"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.sics.se/~kia

Current place of employment:
KTH

Kristina Hook is a professor in Interaction Design at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Sweden. She started and now works in the Mobile Life centre. She also upholds a part-time position at SICS (Swedish Institute of Computer Science).

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Publications by Kristina Höök (bibliography)

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2012

Höök, Kristina (2013): Affective Computing. In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html

2011
 
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Ferreira, Pedro and Höök, Kristina (2011): Bodily Orientations around Mobiles: Lessons learnt in Vanuatu. In: Proceedings of the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 7-12 May, 2011, Vancouver, Canada.

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Ferreira, Pedro and Höök, Kristina (2011): Bodily orientations around mobiles: lessons learnt in vanuatu. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 277-286

Since we started carrying mobiles phones, they have altered the ways in which we orient our bodies in the world. Many of those changes are invisible to us -- they have become habits, deeply engrained in our society. To make us more aware of our bodily ways of living with mobiles and open the design space for novel ways of designing mobiles and their interactions, we decided to study one of the last groups of users on earth who had not been exposed to mobiles: the people of Vanuatu. As they had so recently started using mobiles, their use was still in flux: the fragility of the mobile was unusual to them as was the need to move in order to find coverage. They were still getting used to carrying their mobiles and keeping them safe. Their encounters with mobile use exposed the need to consider somaesthetics practices when designing mobiles as they profoundly affect our bodily ways of being in the world.

© All rights reserved Ferreira and Höök and/or their publisher

 
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Salovaara, Antti, Höök, Kristina, Cheverst, Keith, Twidale, Michael, Chalmers, Matthew and Sas, Corina (2011): Appropriation and creative use: linking user studies and design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 37-40

Appropriation refers to the ways that technologies are ˙adapted and repurposed to new purposes of use by individuals, groups or communities. This workshop brings together researchers interested in appropriation from CSCW and design. Until now, these communities have been working separately, despite their converging interests. The workshop is based on roundtable discussions that bring the participants' qualitative observations and theoretical viewpoints in contact with practical design efforts that support user creativity and appropriation.

© All rights reserved Salovaara et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Kaye, Joseph 'Jofish', Buie, Elizabeth, Hoonhout, Jettie, Höök, Kristina, Roto, Virpi, Jenson, Scott and Wright, Peter (2011): Designing for user experience: academia & industry. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 219-222

As the importance of user experience (UX) has grown, so too have attempts to define, delimit, categorize and theorize about it. In particular, there have been emerging lines of tension in User Experience that parallel the tensions in the larger field of HCI research, particularly between approaches that emphasize the need for representations and understandings of user experience that are precise, comparable, and generalizable, and third-wave approaches that emphasize the richness of situated actions, the inseparability of mind and body, and the contextual dependency of experiences. At the same time, there are tensions between the needs of industry for immediately useful and applicable techniques and methods, and academics' emphasis on verifiable, repeatable, and theoretically grounded work. In this panel, we bring together a number of these threads to discuss the necessity of designing for user experience. How can we connect the different threads of UX work, without erasing the differences between them? Is there any value in theory of UX, and if so, to whom? What actually works in designing for a user experience?

© All rights reserved Kaye et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Li, Ian, Dey, Anind, Forlizzi, Jodi, Höök, Kristina and Medynskiy, Yevgeniy (2011): Personal informatics and HCI: design, theory, and social implications. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2417-2420

Personal informatics is a class of systems that help people collect personal information to improve self-knowledge. The development of personal informatics applications poses new challenges in human-computer interaction and creates opportunities for collaboration between diverse disciplines, including design, ubiquitous computing, persuasive technology and information visualization. This workshop will continue the conversation from the CHI 2010 workshop and extend the discussion of personal informatics to include behavioral theories that can guide the development of such systems, as well as the social implications of self-tracking.

© All rights reserved Li et al. and/or their publisher

Höök, Kristina (2011). Commentary on 'Somaesthetics' by Richard Shusterman

2010
 
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Höök, Kristina (2010): Transferring qualities from horseback riding to design. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 226-235

We see more and more attempts to design for bodily experiences with digital technology, but it is a notably challenging design task. What are the possible bodily experiences we may aim to design for, and how can we characterise them? By analysing a horseback riding experience, we came to identify the following themes: (1) how certain kinds of bodily experiences are best understood through experiencing them yourself -- the bodily ways of knowing, (2) how rhythm and balance create for particularly strong physical experiences of this kind, (3) how movement and emotion coincide in these experiences, (4) how the movement between seeing our own bodies as objects vs experiencing in and through our bodies is one of the ways we come to learn the language of expressing and understanding bodily action, and (5) how this in turn lets us describe the sensitive and delicate relationship of wordless signs and signals that represent, in the case described, two bodily agents -- a human and a horse. When the human-horse relationship is really successful, it can be described as rare moments of becoming a centaur. We translate these themes into design considerations for bodily interactions.

© All rights reserved Höök and/or his/her publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Zangouei, Farnaz, Gashti, Mohammad Ali Babazadeh, Höök, Kristina, Tijs, Tim, Vries, Gert-Jan de and Westerink, Joyce (2010): How to stay in the emotional rollercoaster: lessons learnt from designing EmRoll. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 571-580

Bodily expressions can be used to involve players in intense experiences with games. By physically moving, breathing, or increasing your pulse, you may start emotional processes that help create for a stronger experience of the narrative in the game. We have designed a system named EmRoll that poses riddles to pairs of players. The riddles can only be solved if the players are, or at least pretend to be, moving according to different emotional states: dancing happily, relaxed breathing and being scared. The system measures movement, breathing and sweat reactions from the two players. Lessons learnt were: playing in pairs is an important aspect as the two players influenced one-another, pulling each other into stronger experiences; getting excited through intense movement when involving your whole body worked well, as did relaxing through deep breathing; using the sweat response as an input mechanism worked less well; and finally, putting a Wizard (a human operator) into the loop can help bootstrap difficulty balancing and thereby increase emotional involvement.

© All rights reserved Zangouei et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Vaara, Elsa, Silvasan, Iuliana, Ståhl, Anna and Höök, Kristina (2010): Temporal relations in affective health. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 833-838

In the Affective Health project we explore possibilities of how to, through biofeedback support users in making sense of the relationship between their stress and their behavior in everyday life. Affective Health is a tool for visualizing patterns and trends of bodily and contextual information. It is particularly important that the design reflects changes over time as this is how people start recognizing patterns in their own behavior and connect it to their bodily reactions. We spent substantial effort sketching and testing ways of portraying time that would move us away from more mathematically inspired representations such as for example graphs and calendars. Instead, we want users to see the signals our bodies emit as part of themselves, of their own ways of being in the world, alive, acting and reacting to their environment. We have explored many possible, alternative ways of visualizing biofeedback over time. For example as the relation between different places and with time as different layers of history in a concept inspired from ecology. The latest and most developed concept is a cyclic repetition of biodata mapped on a spiral shape.

© All rights reserved Vaara et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Sanches, Pedro, Höök, Kristina, Vaara, Elsa, Weymann, Claus, Bylund, Markus, Ferreira, Pedro, Peira, Nathalie and Sjölinder, Marie (2010): Mind the body!: designing a mobile stress management application encouraging personal reflection. In: Proceedings of DIS10 Designing Interactive Systems 2010. pp. 47-56

We have designed a stress management biofeedback mobile service for everyday use, aiding users to reflect on both positive and negative patterns in their behavior. To do so, we embarked on a complex multidisciplinary design journey, learning that: detrimental stress results from complex processes related to e.g. the subjective experience of being able to cope (or not) and can therefore not be measured and diagnosed solely as a bodily state. We learnt that it is difficult, sometimes impossible, to make a robust analysis of stress symptoms based on biosensors worn outside the laboratory environment they were designed for. We learnt that rather than trying to diagnose stress, it is better to mirror short-term stress reactions back to them, inviting their own interpretations and reflections. Finally, we identified several experiential qualities that such an interface should entail: ambiguity and openness to interpretation, interactive history of prior states, fluency and aliveness.

© All rights reserved Sanches et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Sundström, Petra and Höök, Kristina (2010): Hand in hand with the material: designing for suppleness. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 463-472

Designing for a supple interaction, involving users bodily and emotionally into a 'dance' with a system is a challenging task. Any break-ups in interaction become fatal to the sensual, fluent, bodily and social experience sought. A user-centered, iterative design cycle is therefore required. But getting to know the affordances of the digital material used to build the application plays an equally important role in the design process. The 'feel' of the digital material properties sometimes even determines what the design should be. We describe three situations in which the properties and affordances of sensor network technologies guided our design process of FriendSense -- a system for expressing friendship and emotional closeness through movement. We show how the sensor node look and feel, choice of sensors, limitations of the radio signal strength and coverage, as well as iterative prototyping to properly exploit the software/algorithmic possibilities guided our design process.

© All rights reserved Sundström and Höök and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Philosophy of Interaction: [/encyclopedia/philosophy_of_interaction.html]


 
2009
 
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Isbister, Katherine and Höök, Kristina (2009): On being supple: in search of rigor without rigidity in meeting new design and evaluation challenges for HCI practitioners. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2233-2242.

In this paper, we argue that HCI practitioners are facing new challenges in design and evaluation that can benefit from the establishment of commonly valued use qualities, with associated strategies for producing and rigorously evaluating work. We present a particular use quality 'suppleness' as an example. We describe ways that use qualities can help shape design and evaluation process, and propose tactics for the CHI community to use to encourage the evolution of bodies of knowledge around use qualities.

© All rights reserved Isbister and Höök and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Vaara, Elsa Kosmack, Höök, Kristina and Tholander, Jakob (2009): Mirroring bodily experiences over time. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4471-4476.

The Affective Health system is a mobile lifestyle application that aims to empower people to reflect on their lives and lifestyles. The system logs a mixture of biosensor-data and other contextually oriented data and transforms these to a colorful, animated expression on their mobiles. It is intended to create a mirror and thereby empower users to see activity patterns and relate these to their experiences of stress. People's different cultural backgrounds and their different physiological and psychological composition give them different perceptions and associations of time. We explore the time dimension of our system through working through a set of different designs that organize events as time going linearly forward, in a circular movement or relating to geographical places. Here we discuss the process of designing a mobile interface for presenting temporal data in a way that allows multiple and subjective interpretation.

© All rights reserved Vaara et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sundström, Petra, Jaensson, Tove, Höök, Kristina and Pommeranz, Alina (2009): Probing the potential of non-verbal group communication. In: GROUP09 - International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2009. pp. 351-360.

Designing for non-verbal communication using e.g. gestures and other bodily expressions is difficult. Hardware and software need to be co-designed and harmonize in order to not throw users out of their embodied experience. We aim to design for kinaesthetic expressions of emotion in communication between friends -- in this case, colleagues at work. A probe was built using sensor node technology designed to let users express themselves and their emotional state to a public and shared display where the expressions together formed a collective art piece expressing the individuals but also the group as a whole. Two groups of colleagues used the probe during two weeks. It came to serve as a channel in which some conflicts and expressions of social relations were acted out which were not openly discussed in the office. It exposed different roles and balances in relationships in the group. Finally, the probe taught us the importance of balancing the design for joint group expression and individual, personal expressions. The study also allowed the participants to experience the sensor node-'material' -- enabling a participatory design process.

© All rights reserved Sundström et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Ståhl, Anna, Höök, Kristina, Svensson, Martin, Taylor, Alex S. and Combetto, Marco (2009): Experiencing the Affective Diary. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 13 (5) pp. 365-378

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Höök, Kristina (2009): Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment. In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 364 p. 3585–3595

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
2008
 
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Höök, Kristina, Ståhl, Anna, Sundström, Petra and Laaksolaahti, Jarmo (2008): Interactional empowerment. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 647-656.

We propose that an interactional perspective on how emotion is constructed, shared and experienced, may be a good basis for designing affective interactional systems that do not infringe on privacy or autonomy, but instead empowers users. An interactional design perspective may make use of design elements such as open-ended, ambiguous, yet familiar, interaction surfaces that users can use as a basis to make sense of their own emotions and their communication with one-another. We describe the interactional view on design for emotional communication, and provide a set of orienting design concepts and methods for design and evaluation that help translate the interactional view into viable applications. From an embodied interaction theory perspective, we argue for a non-dualistic, non-reductionist view on affective interaction design.

© All rights reserved Höök et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Ferreira, Pedro, Sanches, Pedro, Höök, Kristina and Jaensson, Tove (2008): License to chill!: how to empower users to cope with stress. In: Proceedings of the Fifth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 123-132.

There exists today a paucity of tools and devices that empower people to take control over their everyday behaviors and balance their stress levels. To overcome this deficit, we are creating a mobile service, Affective Health, where we aim to provide a holistic approach towards health by enabling users to make a connection between their daily activities and their own memories and subjective experiences. This construction is based upon values detected from certain bodily reactions that are then visualized on a mobile phone. Accomplishing this entailed figuring out how to provide real-time feedback without making the individual even more stressed, while also making certain that the representation empowered rather than controlled them. Useful design feedback was derived from testing two different visualizations on the mobile in a Wizard of Oz study. In short, we found that a successful design needs to: feel alive, allow for interpretative openness, include short-term history, and be updated in real-time. We also found that the interaction did not increase our participants stress reactions.

© All rights reserved Ferreira et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Friedman, Batya, Höök, Kristina, Gill, Brian, Eidmar, Lina, Prien, Catherine Sallmander and Severson, Rachel (2008): Personlig integritet: a comparative study of perceptions of privacy in public places in Sweden and the United States. In: Proceedings of the Fifth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 142-151.

In this paper we report on a cross-cultural study of people's judgments about privacy in public places. Replicating and extending a previously published study conducted in the US, 350 surveys and 30 interviews were conducted on a university campus in a major city in Sweden. Participants were recruited on campus while walking through a major public through fare which was being captured by a video camera and displayed in real-time in a room in a campus building overlooking the area. We analyze the Swedish data alone and also report comparative analyses with the previously published US data. Results showed in general Swedes are substantially more concerned about privacy in public places than their counterparts in the US. In both countries, women generally expressed more concern than men, but this gender gap was greater in the US than Sweden. Discussion focuses on cross-cultural perspectives on privacy in public and implications for interaction design.

© All rights reserved Friedman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Bylund, Markus, Höök, Kristina and Pommeranz, Alina (2008): Pieces of identity. In: Proceedings of the Fifth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 427-430.

We describe the motivation, design, and deployment of the Pieces of Identity system. Two goals motivated the system: to provoke a discussion concerning the relationship between privacy and mobile information technology during an inauguration event of a mobile technology research center, and to stir reactions contributing to the widening of the design space of privacy and information and communication technology (ICT). The results contrasts the two well-established preconceptions about privacy that nothing is private anymore and that personal information is best locked away.

© All rights reserved Bylund et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Ståhl, Anna and Höök, Kristina (2008): Reflecting on the design process of the Affective Diary. In: Proceedings of the Fifth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 559-564.

Affective Diary is a digital diary that makes use of bio-sensors to add some reminiscence of bodily experiences. The design process behind Affective Diary was 'sensitive' to three design qualities extracted from a previous project; providing cues of emotional expressivity building on familiarity, making the design open for personal expressivity and be aware of contradictions between modalities. Through the design process of Affective Diary, with frequent user involvements during the process, these design qualities became further tested, developed and refined. By providing a fairly detailed and reflected description of the design process behind Affective Diary, we aim to provide other designers with inspiration on several levels: both in terms of methods used, but also in why these three design qualities are important and how to realize them. Our aim is also to provide designers with knowledge in the form that makes sense to designers: the practical link between design qualities and final results.

© All rights reserved Ståhl and Höök and/or their publisher

 
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Höök, Kristina (2008): Affective Loop Experiences - What Are They?. In: Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri, Hasle, Per F. V., Harjumaa, Marja, Segerståhl, Katarina and Øhrstrøm, Peter (eds.) PERSUASIVE 2008 - Persuasive Technology, Third International Conference June 4-6, 2008, Oulu, Finland. pp. 1-12.

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
2007
 
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Isbister, Katherine and Höök, Kristina (2007): Evaluating affective interactions. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 65 (4) pp. 273-274.

 
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Isbister, Katherine, Höök, Kristina, Laaksolahti, Jarmo and Sharp, Michael (2007): The sensual evaluation instrument: Developing a trans-cultural self-report measure of affect. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 65 (4) pp. 315-328.

In this paper we describe the development and testing of a tool for self-assessment of affect while interacting with computer systems, meant to be used in many cultures. We discuss our research approach within the context of existing cultural, affective and HCI theory, and describe testing of its effectiveness in the US and Sweden.

© All rights reserved Isbister et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Sundström, Petra, Ståhl, Anna and Höök, Kristina (2007): In situ informants exploring an emotional mobile messaging system in their everyday practice. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 65 (4) pp. 388-403.

We have designed and built a mobile emotional messaging system named eMoto. With it, users can compose messages through using emotion-signalling gestures as input, rendering a message background of colours, shapes and animations expressing the emotional content. The design intent behind eMoto was that it should be engaging physically, intellectually and socially, and allow users to express themselves emotionally in all those dimensions, involving them in an affective loop experience. In here, we describe the user-centred design process that lead to the eMoto system, but focus mainly on the final study where we let five friends use eMoto for two weeks. The study method, which we name in situ informants, helped us enter and explore the subjective and distributed experiences of use, as well as how emotional communication unfolds in everyday practice when channelled through a system like eMoto. The in situ informants are on the one hand users of eMoto, but also spectators, that are close friends who observe and document user behaviour. Design conclusions include the need to support the sometimes fragile communication rhythm that friendships require -- expressing memories of the past, sharing the present and planning for the future. We saw that emotions are not singular state that exist within one person alone, but permeates the total situation, changing and drifting as a process between the two friends communicating. We also gained insights into the under-estimated but still important physical, sensual aspects of emotional communication. Experiences of the in situ informants method pointed to the need to involve participants in the interpretation of the data obtained, as well as establishing a closer connection with the spectators.

© All rights reserved Sundström et al. and/or Academic Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
2006
 
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Isbister, Katherine, Höök, Kristina, Sharp, Michael and Laaksolahti, Jarmo (2006): The sensual evaluation instrument: developing an affective evaluation tool. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 1163-1172.

In this paper we describe the development and initial testing of a tool for self-assessment of affect while interacting with computer systems: the Sensual Evaluation Instrument. We discuss our research approach within the context of existing affective and HCI theory, and describe stages of evolution of the tool, and initial testing of its effectiveness.

© All rights reserved Isbister et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Höök, Kristina (2006): Designing familiar open surfaces. In: Proceedings of the Fourth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2006. pp. 242-251.

While participatory design makes end-users part of the design process, we might also want the resulting system to be open for interpretation, appropriation and change over time to reflect its usage. But how can we design for appropriation? We need to strike a good balance between making the user an active co-constructor of system functionality versus making a too strong, interpretative design that does it all for the user thereby inhibiting their own creative use of the system. Through revisiting five systems in which appropriation has happened both within and outside the intended use, we are going to show how it can be possible to design with open surfaces. These open surfaces have to be such that users can fill them with their own interpretation and content, they should be familiar to the user, resonating with their real world practice and understanding, thereby shaping its use.

© All rights reserved Höök and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
2005
 
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Sjolinder, Marie, Höök, Kristina, Nilsson, Lars-Goran and Andersson, Gerd (2005): Age differences and the acquisition of spatial knowledge in a three-dimensional environment: Evaluating the use of an overview map as a navigation aid. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 63 (6) pp. 537-564.

This study examined age differences in the use of an electronic three-dimensional (3D) environment, and how the age differences were affected by the use of an overview map as a navigation aid. Task performance and the subjects' acquisition of configural knowledge of the 3D-environment were assessed. Impact of spatial ability and prior experience on these measurements were also investigated. One group of older subjects (n=24) and one group of younger subjects (n=24) participated. An overall hypothesis for the work presented here was that differences in learning to and performing navigational tasks in the physical world are similar in learning and performing navigational tasks in the virtual world. The results showed that the older participants needed more time to solve the tasks; and similar to navigation in the physical world, the older participants were less likely to create configural knowledge. It could not be established that older participants benefited more from an overview map as cognitive support than younger subjects, except in the subjective sense: the older users felt more secure when the map was there. The map seemed to have supported the older users in creating a feeling of where objects were located within the environment, but it did not make them more efficient. The results have implications for design; in particular, it brings up the difficult issue of balancing design goals such as efficiency in terms of time and functionality, against maintaining a sense of direction and location in navigational situations.

© All rights reserved Sjolinder et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Sundstrom, Petra, Stahl, Anna and Höök, Kristina (2005): eMoto: affectively involving both body and mind. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 2005-2008.

It is known that emotions are experienced by both body and mind. Oftentimes, emotions are evoked by sub-symbolic stimuli, such as colors, shapes, gestures, or music. We have built eMoto, a mobile service for sending affective messages to others, with the explicit aim of addressing such sensing. Through combining affective gestures for input with affective expressions that make use of colors, shapes and animations for the background of messages, the interaction pulls the user into an embodied 'affective loop'. We present a user study of eMoto where 12 out of 18 subjects got both physically and emotionally involved in the interaction. The study also shows that the designed 'openness' and ambiguity of the expressions, was appreciated and understood by our subjects.

© All rights reserved Sundstrom et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Isbister, Katherine and Höök, Kristina (2005): Evaluating affective interfaces: innovative approaches. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. p. 2119.

This paper presents the broad outlines of the context and goals for a one-day workshop concerning the evaluation of affective interfaces.

© All rights reserved Isbister and Höök and/or ACM Press

 
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Ståhl, Anna, Sundström, Petra and Höök, Kristina (2005): A foundation for emotional expressivity. In: Proceedings of the Conference on Designing for User Experiences DUX05 2005. p. 33.

To express emotions to others in mobile text messaging in our view require designs that can both capture some of the ambiguity and subtleness that characterizes emotional interaction and keep the media specific qualities. Through the use of a body movement analysis and a dimensional model of emotion experiences, we arrived at a design for a mobile messaging service, eMoto. The service makes use of the sub-symbolic expressions; colors, shapes and animations, for expressing emotions in an open-ended way. Here we present the design process and a user study of those expressions, where the results show that the use of these sub-symbolic expressions can work as a foundation to use as a creative tool, but still allowing for the communication to be situated. The inspiration taken from body movements proved to be very useful as a design input. It was also reflected in the way our subjects described the expressions.

© All rights reserved Ståhl et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Oulasvirta, Antti, Tamminen, Sakari and Höök, Kristina (2005): Comparing two approaches to context: realism and constructivism. In: Bertelsen, Olav W., Bouvin, Niels Olof, Krogh, Peter Gall and Kyng, Morten (eds.) Proceedings of the 4th Decennial Conference on Critical Computing 2005 August 20-24, 2005, Aarhus, Denmark. pp. 195-198.

 
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Sundström, Petra, Ståhl, Anna and Höök, Kristina (2005): A User-Centered Approach to Affective Interaction. In: Tao, Jianhua, Tan, Tieniu and Picard, Rosalind W. (eds.) ACII 2005 - Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, First International Conference October 22-24, 2005, Beijing, China. pp. 931-938.

2004
 
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Höök, Kristina (2004): Active co-construction of meaningful experiences: but what is the designer's role?. In: Proceedings of the Third Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction October 23-27, 2004, Tampere, Finland. pp. 1-2.

This talk discusses how to strike a good balance between making the user an active co-constructor of system functionality versus making a too strong, interpretative design that does it all for the user. It is easy to fall into the trap of being insensitive to users as actors instead seeing them as passive users. It is equally easy to fall into a postmodernism trap where it is assumed that users will always appropriate technology in ways that are unexpected by the designer, and thus, basically the designer can abdicate.

© All rights reserved Höök and/or ACM Press

 
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Fagerberg, Petra, Ståhl, Anna and Höök, Kristina (2004): eMoto: emotionally engaging interaction. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (5) pp. 377-381.

2003
 
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Höök, Kristina, Sengers, Phoebe and Andersson, Gerd (2003): Sense and sensibility: evaluation and interactive art. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 241-248.

 
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Paiva, Ana, Costa, Marco, Chaves, Ricardo, Piedade, Moises, Mourao, Dario, Sobral, Daniel, Höök, Kristina, Andersson, Gerd and Bullock, Adrian (2003): SenToy: an affective sympathetic interface. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 59 (1) pp. 227-235.

We describe the design and implementation of SenToy: a tangible doll with sensors that allows a user to influence the emotions of a synthetic character in a game. SenToy is an input device that allows the user to perform gestures or movements that the sensors inside the doll pick up. The gestures are interpreted according to a scheme found through two different user studies: one Wizard of Oz study and one study with a fully functioning SenToy. Different gestures express one of the following emotions: anger, fear, surprise, sadness, gloating and happiness. Depending upon the expressed emotion, the synthetic character in the game will, in turn, perform different actions (trading, duelling, etc.). The evaluation of SenToy acting as the interface to the computer game FantasyA has shown that the users were able to express the desired emotions to influence the synthetic characters, and that overall players liked the doll as an interface.

© All rights reserved Paiva et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Paiva, Ana, Prada, Rui, Chaves, Ricardo, Vala, Marco, Bullock, Adrian, Andersson, Gerd and Höök, Kristina (2003): Towards tangibility in gameplay: building a tangible affective interface for a computer game. In: Oviatt, Sharon L., Darrell, Trevor, Maybury, Mark T. and Wahlster, Wolfgang (eds.) Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2003 November 5-7, 2003, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 60-67.

 
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Paiva, Ana, Prada, Rui, Chaves, Ricardo, Vala, Marco, Bullock, Adrian, Andersson, Gerd and Höök, Kristina (2003): Demo: playingfFantasyA with senToy. In: Oviatt, Sharon L., Darrell, Trevor, Maybury, Mark T. and Wahlster, Wolfgang (eds.) Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2003 November 5-7, 2003, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 303-304.

 
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Höök, Kristina (2003): Social navigation: from the web to the mobile. In: Szwillus, Gerd and Ziegler, Jürgen (eds.) Mensch and Computer 2003 September 7-10, 2003, Stuttgart, Germany. .

 
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Prada, Rui, Vala, Marco, Paiva, Ana, Höök, Kristina and Bullock, Adrian (2003): FantasyA - The Duel of Emotions. In: Rist, Thomas, Aylett, Ruth, Ballin, Daniel and Rickel, Jeff (eds.) IVA 2003 - Intelligent Agents - 4th International Workshop September 15-17, 2003, Kloster Irsee, Germany. pp. 62-66.

 
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Paiva, Ana, Prada, Rui, Chaves, Ricardo, Vala, Marco, Bullock, Adrian, Andersson, Gerd and Höök, Kristina (2003): Towards tangibility in gameplay: building a tangible affective interface for a computer game. In: Proceedings of the 2003 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2003. pp. 60-67

In this paper we describe a way of controlling the emotional states of a synthetic character in a game (FantasyA) through a tangible interface named SenToy. SenToy is a doll with sensors in the arms, legs and body, allowing the user to influence the emotions of her character in the game. The user performs gestures and movements with SenToy, which are picked up by the sensors and interpreted according to a scheme found through an initial Wizard of Oz study. Different gestures are used to express each of the following emotions: anger, fear, happiness, surprise, sadness and gloating. Depending upon the expressed emotion, the synthetic character in FantasyA will, in turn, perform different actions. The evaluation of SenToy acting as the interface to the computer game FantasyA has shown that users were able to express most of the desired emotions to influence the synthetic characters, and that overall, players, especially children, really liked the doll as an interface.

© All rights reserved Paiva et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Paiva, Ana, Prada, Rui, Chaves, Ricardo, Vala, Marco, Bullock, Adrian, Andersson, Gerd and Höök, Kristina (2003): Demo: playingfFantasyA with senToy. In: Proceedings of the 2003 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2003. pp. 303-304

Game development is an emerging area of development for new types of interaction between computers and humans. New forms of communication are now being explored there, influenced not only by face to face communication but also by recent developments in multi-modal communication and tangible interfaces. This demo will feature a computer game, FantasyA, where users can play the game by interacting with a tangible interface, SenToy (see Figure 1). The main idea is to involve objects and artifacts from real life into ways to interact with systems, and in particular with games. So, SenToy is an interface for users to project some of their emotional gestures through moving the doll in certain ways. This device would establish a link between the users (holding the physical device) and a controlled avatar (embodied by that physical device) of the computer game, FantasyA.

© All rights reserved Paiva et al. and/or their publisher

2002
 
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Sengers, Phoebe, Liesendahi, Rainer, Magar, Werner, Seibert, Christoph, Muller, Boris, Joachims, Thorsten, Geng, Weidong, Martensson, Pia and Höök, Kristina (2002): The enigmatics of affect. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 87-98.

Affective computation generally focuses on the informatics of affect: structuring, formalizing, and representing emotion as informational units. We propose instead an enigmatics of affect, a critical technical practice that respects the rich and undefinable complexities of human affective experience. Our interactive installation, the Influencing Machine, allows users to explore a dynamic landscape of emotionally expressive sound and child-like drawings, using a tangible, intuitive input device that supports open-ended engagement. The Influencing Machine bridges the subjective experience of the user and the necessary objective rationality of the underlying code. It functions as a cultural probe, reflecting and challenging users to reflect on the cultural meaning of affective computation.

© All rights reserved Sengers et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Andersson, Gerd, Höök, Kristina, Mourao, Dario, Paiva, Ana and Costa, Marco (2002): Using a Wizard of Oz study to inform the design of SenToy. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 349-355.

We describe the design of an affective control interface, SenToy, a doll with sensors that allows users to control their avatars in an adventure game. A Wizard of Oz study was used early in the design process to find the best relationship between user movements of SenToy and the resulting affective expressions and movements of their avatar on the screenon the screen. The results from the study showed that there are behaviors and gestures that most users will easily pick up to express emotions. It told us which dimensions of movements (distance to screen, movements of limbs, etc.) that work most easily will be picked up by users. We describe in what way the results from the study have affected the design of the SenToy and the hardware requirements. Wizard of Oz studies have previously been used for natural language interface and intelligent agent design and we show that it can also be used in the domain of affective input-device design.

© All rights reserved Andersson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Paiva, Ana, Andersson, Gerd, Höök, Kristina, Mourao, Dario, Costa, Marco and Martinho, Carlos (2002): SenToy in FantasyA: Designing an Affective Sympathetic Interface to a Computer Game. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 6 (5) pp. 378-389.

2001
 
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Svensson, Martin, Höök, Kristina, Laaksolahti, Jarmo and Waern, Annika (2001): Social Navigation of Food Recipes. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 341-348.

The term Social Navigation captures every-day behaviour used to find information, people, and places - namely through watching, following, and talking to people. We discuss how to design information spaces to allow for social navigation. We applied our ideas in a recipe recommendation system. In a follow-up user study, subjects state that social navigation adds value to the service: it provides for social affordance, and it helps turning a space into a social place. The study also reveals some unresolved design issues, such as the snowball effect where more and more users follow each other down the wrong path, and privacy issues.

© All rights reserved Svensson et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Dieberger, A., Dourish, Paul, Höök, Kristina, Resnick, Paul and Wexelblat, Alan (2000): Social navigation: techniques for building more usable systems. In Interactions, 7 (6) pp. 36-45.

The term "navigation" conjures images of maps, compasses, and guidebooks. These may be tools we use to get around from time to time, but are they how we usually find our way? Imagine walking down a street in your hometown, trying to decide what to do. You notice a crowd outside your favorite cafe. Knowing that the cafe often has live music, you can guess that a special event must be happening tonight. You might decide that you're in the mood for a lively evening and join the line, or you might decide that you prefer a quiet night and look for a different cafe. Or imagine you're in a library, looking for a book about interface design. One of the books on the shelf is much more worn and dog-eared than the other, suggesting that lots of people have read it. You may decide it's a better place to start learning than the pristine books beside it on the shelf. In both cases, you didn't rely on maps or guides; instead, you used information from other people to help make your decision. This is a different sort of "finding your way." We call it "social navigation," a topic we discussed on a panel at CHI'99 in Pittsburgh.

© All rights reserved Dieberger et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Höök, Kristina (2000): Steps to Take Before Intelligent User Interfaces Become Real. In Interacting with Computers, 12 (4) pp. 409-426.

Intelligent user interfaces have been proposed as a means to overcome some of the problems that direct manipulation interfaces cannot handle, such as: information overflow problems; providing help on how to use complex systems; or real-time cognitive overload problems. Intelligent user interfaces are also being proposed as a means to make systems individualised or personalised, thereby increasing the system's flexibility and appeal. Unfortunately, there are a number of problems not yet solved that prevent us from creating good intelligent user interface applications. We do not have efficient methods for developing them. There are demands on better usability principles for them. We need a better understanding of the possible ways the interface can utilise intelligence to improve the interaction. Finally, we need to design better tools that will enable an intelligent system to survive the full life cycle of a system (including updates of the database, system support, etc.). We define these problems further and point out some possible solutions.

© All rights reserved Höök and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Svensson, Martin, Laaksolahti, Jarmo, Höök, Kristina and Waern, Annika (2000): A Recipe Based On-Line Food Store. In: Lieberman, Henry (ed.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2000 January 9-12, 2000, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. pp. 260-263.

Recent research in the area of information retrieval hypothesizes that people benefit from social clues, so called social navigation, when they try to navigate information spaces [7]. We have designed an on-line grocery store building upon those ideas manifested in several different ways. The most central feature is that the system uses a combination of content-based and collaborative filtering as the basis for recipe recommendations. This filtering process can in turn be controlled by editors, whose role is to control the content of the "recipe clubs". Other types of social clues are also present, such as displaying how many users that have chosen a recipe. Finally, the system shows information about other users currently present in the system, and allows users to get in direct contact through chat.

© All rights reserved Svensson et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Höök, Kristina (1999): Designing and Evaluating Intelligent User Interfaces. In: Maybury, Mark T. (ed.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1999 January 5-8, 1999, Redondo Beach, California, USA. pp. 5-6.

Intelligent user interfaces have been proposed as a means to overcome some of the problems that direct-manipulation interfaces cannot handle, such as: information overflow problems; providing help on how to use complex systems; or real-time cognitive overload problems. Intelligent user interfaces are also being proposed as a means to make systems individualised or personalised, thereby increasing the systems flexibility and appeal. But in order for intelligent user interface to gain ground and be of real use to their users, more attention has to be given to usability issues. In this tutorial we shall discuss methods for design and evaluation of intelligent user interfaces from a usability perspective.

© All rights reserved Höök and/or ACM Press

 
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Höök, Kristina and Svensson, Martin (1999): Evaluating Adaptive Navigation Support. In: Maybury, Mark T. (ed.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1999 January 5-8, 1999, Redondo Beach, California, USA. p. 187.

"Lost in hyperspace" is a feeling that is familiar to almost anyone using a computer. After a few actions, we do not know where we are, how we got there, or what our original goal was. Adaptive navigation systems has been proposed as a means to aid users in finding their way through information spaces. Several systems have been designed that adapts the navigation to users' knowledge (e.g 11), to users' preferences and goals (9), to users' tasks (8), or to users' spatial ability (1,6). The hope is that if user characteristics are considered the cognitive workload can be reduced, or users' learning may be improved, etc., but will they?

© All rights reserved Höök and Svensson and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Forsberg, Mattias, Höök, Kristina and Svensson, Martin (1998): Design Principles for Social Navigation Tools. In: Stephanidis, Constantine and Waern, Annika (eds.) Proceedings of the 4th ERCIM Workshop on User Interfaces for All October 19-21, 1998, Stockholm, Sweden. p. 13.

Social navigation is an alternative to the prevailing methods for navigating metaphors. It utilises the fact that most information navigation in the real world is performed by interaction with other people. Based on literature studies and user studies on social navigation we have developed six principles that have to be taken into consideration when designing systems for social navigation in order to make the navigational experience more efficient, qualitative and enjoyable. The principles are Integration, Trust, Presence, Privacy, Appropriateness and Personalization.

© All rights reserved Forsberg et al. and/or The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics - ERCIM

 
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Höök, Kristina (1998): Designing and Evaluating Intelligent User Interfaces. In: Marks, Joe (ed.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1998 January 6-9, 1998, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 5-6.

Intelligent user interfaces have been proposed as a means to overcome some of the problems that direct-manipulation interfaces cannot handle, such as: information overflow problems; providing help on how to use complex systems; or real-time cognitive overload problems. Intelligent user interfaces are also being proposed as a means to make systems individualised or personalised, thereby increasing the systems flexibility and appeal. But in order for intelligent user interface to gain ground and be of real use to their users, more attention has to be given to usability issues. In this tutorial we shall discuss methods for design and evaluation of intelligent user interfaces from a usability perspective.

© All rights reserved Höök and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Höök, Kristina (1997): Evaluating the Utility and Usability of an Adaptive Hypermedia System. In: Moore, Johanna D., Edmonds, Ernest and Puerta, Angel R. (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1997 January 6-9, 1997, Orlando, Florida, USA. pp. 179-186.

We have evaluated an adaptive hypermedia system, PUSH, and compared it to a non-adaptive variant of the same system. Based on an inferred information seeking task, PUSH chooses what to show and what to hide in a page using a stretchtext technique, thus attempting to avoid information overload. We studied how successful the subjects were in retrieving the most relevant information, and found that the subjects' solutions were influenced by the choice made by the adaptive system. We also studied how much the adaptivity reduced the amount of actions needed, and found that subjects made substantially fewer actions in the adaptive case. A third measurement was the subjects subjective preferences for the adaptive or the non-adaptive system, were we found that the subjects clearly preferred the adaptive system. It seems as if it requires less decisions on behalf of the subject, thereby reducing their cognitive load.

© All rights reserved Höök and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Hammarstroem, Kent Saxin, Höök, Kristina and Ereback, Anna-Lena (1994): Convene -- MUD Interfaces for Disabled Users. In: Stephanidis, Constantine and Carbonell, Noelle (eds.) Proceedings of the 3rd ERCIM Workshop on User Interfaces for All November 3-4, 1994, Obernai, France. p. 6.

Convene is a problem oriented project regarding communication interfaces for disabled users. We have chosen to especially study interfaces for MUD (Multi User Dimension) systems, i.e. environments where multiple users interact in a common virtual environment, often in the form of a game. The results will be applicable in other areas, as the interactions in a MUD comprise most aspects of communication. In the first, ongoing phase, we identify the problems specific to our user groups. These problems include handling fast interactions among participants, navigation in the MUD world, and general communication skills. Starting from our understanding of these problems, we propose a design with two main approaches to tackling the problems of our users: * Separation of information into multiple modalities (speech, images, etc) and adaptation of these to specific disabilities; * Transferring some information processing to simple forms of agents.

© All rights reserved Hammarstroem et al. and/or The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics - ERCIM

1993
 
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Höök, Kristina, Karlgren, Jussi and Waern, Annika (1993): Inferring Complex Plans. In: Gray, Wayne D., Hefley, William and Murray, Dianne (eds.) International Workshop on Intelligent User Interfaces 1993 January 4-7, 1993, Orlando, Florida, USA. pp. 231-234.

We examine the need for plan inference in intelligent help mechanisms. We argue that previous approaches have drawbacks that need to be overcome to make plan inference useful. Firstly, plans have to be inferred -- not extracted from the users' help requests. Secondly, the plans inferred must be more than a single goal or solitary user command.

© All rights reserved Höök et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/kristina_h%f6%f6k.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1993-2012
Pub. count:58
Number of co-authors:81



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gerd Andersson:9
Ana Paiva:8
Anna Ståhl:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

Kristina Höök's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Paul Dourish:96
Jodi Forlizzi:90
Antti Oulasvirta:57
 
 
 
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