Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2012
Pub. count:70
Number of co-authors:115



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Kirstie Hawkey:12
Regan L. Mandryk:9
David Dearman:9

 

 

Productive colleagues

Kori Inkpen's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ravin Balakrishnan:108
Allison Druin:81
Mary Czerwinski:80
 
 
 
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Kori Inkpen

Has also published under the name of:
"Kori M. Inkpen" and "K. M. Inkpen"

Personal Homepage:
research.microsoft.com/en-us/people/kori/


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Publications by Kori Inkpen (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Barksdale, Jeremy, Inkpen, Kori, Czerwinski, Mary, Hoff, Aaron, Johns, Paul, Roseway, Asta and Venolia, Gina (2012): Video threads: asynchronous video sharing for temporally distributed teams. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 1101-1104.

Work teams are often geographically distributed, and in some cases, experience large time-zone differences with no overlap in working hours. We explored the use of asynchronous video in temporally distributed teams. We developed VideoThreads, which provides a novel thread-based visualization of video messages. Based on a deployment to four teams, we offer design recommendations and insights about the benefits of asynchronous video sharing.

© All rights reserved Barksdale et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Junuzovic, Sasa, Inkpen, Kori, Blank, Tom and Gupta, Anoop (2012): PixIO: sharing any surface. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 273-274.

Task and reference spaces are important channels of communication for remote collaboration. A number of systems exist for sharing these spaces, but all of them have an inherent flaw: none can share arbitrary physical and digital objects on arbitrary surfaces. We have created PixIO, a new cost-effective, light-weight peripheral device that solves this problem. It shares hand gestures and arbitrary objects, such as notes, drawings, and digital documents, on arbitrary surfaces, such as tables and whiteboards.

© All rights reserved Junuzovic et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Riche, Nathalie Henry, Inkpen, Kori, Stasko, John, Gross, Tom and Czerwinski, Mary (2012): Supporting asynchronous collaboration in visual analytics systems. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces 2012. pp. 809-811.

Visual analytics involves complex analytical processes that can often benefit from collaboration. Many researchers have explored co-located synchronous systems to help support collaborative visual analytics; however, the process can often be long and require a series of sessions. Providing support for asynchronous collaboration in visual analytics systems can help divide the problem between several analysts across many sessions to ensure that they can effectively work together toward a solution. Currently, visual analytics systems offer limited support for asynchronous, multi-session work [1]. In this workshop, we seek to bring together researchers from both the CSCW and Visual Analytics communities to discuss avenues for supporting asynchronous collaboration in visual analytics system.

© All rights reserved Riche et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Tang, John C., Zhao, Chen, Cao, Xiang and Inkpen, Kori (2011): Your time zone or mine?: a study of globally time zone-shifted collaboration. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 235-244.

We conducted interviews with sixteen members of teams that worked across global time zone differences. Despite time zone differences of about eight hours, collaborators still found time to synchronously meet. The interviews identified the diverse strategies teams used to find time windows to interact, which often included times outside of the normal workday and connecting from home to participate. Recent trends in increased work connectivity from home and blurred boundaries between work and home enabled more scheduling flexibility. While email use was understandably prevalent, there was also general interest in video, although obstacles remain for widespread usage. We propose several design implications for supporting this growing population of workers that need to span global time zone differences.

© All rights reserved Tang et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Inkpen, Kori and Sedlins, Mara (2011): Me and my avatar: exploring users' comfort with avatars for workplace communication. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 383-386.

This paper describes results from a large-scale survey to explore users' comfort with different styles of avatars for workplace communication. Thirty-one avatars were evaluated based on users' ratings along several dimensions and grouped into five different clusters. The highest rated cluster was the set of formal, realistic avatars that users did not feel were creepy. These avatars were ranked comparatively with webcam photos, and users felt that they would be appropriate for work. Our results also revealed that realism is nuanced, as avatars in another cluster were also rated high on realism, but were felt to be inappropriate for work. Finally, this work also demonstrates that people are more particular concerning which type of avatar they are represented by, compared to ones they interact with.

© All rights reserved Inkpen and Sedlins and/or their publisher

 
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Junuzovic, Sasa, Inkpen, Kori, Hegde, Rajesh, Zhang, Zhengyou, Tang, John and Brooks, Christopher (2011): What did i miss?: in-meeting review using multimodal accelerated instant replay (air) conferencing. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 513-522.

People sometimes miss small parts of meetings and need to quickly catch up without disrupting the rest of the meeting. We developed an Accelerated Instant Replay (AIR) Conferencing system for videoconferencing that enables users to catch up on missed content while the meeting is ongoing. AIR can replay parts of the conference using four different modalities: audio, video, conversation transcript, and shared workspace. We performed two studies to evaluate the system. The first study explored the benefit of AIR catch-up during a live meeting. The results showed that when the full videoconference was reviewed (i.e., all four modalities) at an accelerated rate, users were able to correctly recall a similar amount of information as when listening live. To better understand the benefit of full review, a follow-up study more closely examined the benefits of each of the individual modalities. The results show that users (a) preferred using audio along with any other modality to using audio alone, (b) were most confident and performed best when audio was reviewed with all other modalities, (c) compared to audio-only, had better recall of facts and explanations when reviewing audio together with the shared workspace and transcript modalities, respectively, and (d) performed similarly with audio-only and audio with video review.

© All rights reserved Junuzovic et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Brush, A. J., Johns, Paul, Inkpen, Kori and Meyers, Brian (2011): Speech@home: an exploratory study. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 617-632.

To understand how people might use a speech dialog system in the public areas of their homes, we conducted an exploratory field study in six households. For two weeks each household used a system that logged motion and usage data, recorded speech diary entries and used Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM) to prompt participants for additional examples of speech commands. The results demonstrated our participants' interest in speech interaction at home, in particular for web browsing, calendaring and email tasks, although there are still many technical challenges that need to be overcome. More generally, our study suggests the value of using speech to enable a wide range of interactions.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Junuzovic, Sasa, Inkpen, Kori, Hegde, Rajesh and Zhang, Zhengyou (2011): Towards ideal window layouts for multi-party, gaze-aware desktop videoconferencing. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Graphics Interface 2011. pp. 119-126.

In high-end desktop videoconferencing systems, several windows compete for screen space, particularly when users also share an application. Ideally, the layout of these windows should satisfy both (a) layout guidelines for establishing a rich communication channel and (b) user preferences for window layouts. This paper presents an exploration of user preferences and their interplay with previously established window layout guidelines. Based on results from two user studies, we have created five recommendations for user-preferred window layouts in high-end desktop videoconferencing systems. Both designers and end-users can use these recommendations to setup "ideal" layouts, that is, layouts that satisfy both user preferences and existing layout guidelines. For instance, we have developed an application that utilizes the recommendations to guide users towards ideal layouts during a videoconference.

© All rights reserved Junuzovic et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Venolia, Gina, Tang, John, Cervantes, Ruy, Bly, Sara, Robertson, George, Lee, Bongshin and Inkpen, Kori (2010): Embodied social proxy: mediating interpersonal connection in hub-and-satellite teams. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1049-1058.

Current business conditions have given rise to distributed teams that are mostly collocated except for one remote member. These "hub-and-satellite" teams face the challenge of the satellite colleague being out-of-sight and out-of-mind. We developed a telepresence device, called an Embodied Social Proxy (ESP), which represents the satellite coworker 24x7. Beyond using ESPs in our own group, we deployed an ESP in four product teams within our company for six weeks. We studied how ESP was used through ethnographic observations, surveys, and usage log data. ESP not only increased the satellite worker's ability to fully participate in meetings, it also increased the hub's attention and affinity towards the satellite. The continuous physical presence of ESP in each team improved the interpersonal social connections between hub and satellite colleagues.

© All rights reserved Venolia et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Yarosh, Svetlana, Inkpen, Kori and Brush, A. J. Bernheim (2010): Video playdate: toward free play across distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1251-1260.

We present an empirical investigation of video-mediated free play between 13 pairs of friends (ages 7 and 8). The pairs spent 10 minutes playing with each of four different prototypes we developed to support free play over videoconferencing. We coded each interaction for the types of play and the amount of social play observed. The children in our study were largely successful in playing together across videoconferencing, though challenges in managing visibility, attention, and intersubjectivity made it more difficult than face-to-face play. We also found that our prototypes supported some types of play to varying degrees. Our contribution lies in identifying these design tradeoffs and providing directions for future design of video-mediated communication systems for children.

© All rights reserved Yarosh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Inkpen, Kori, Hegde, Rajesh, Czerwinski, Mary and Zhang, Zhengyou (2010): Exploring spatialized audio & video for distributed conversations. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 95-98.

Previous work has demonstrated the benefits of spatial audio conferencing over monophonic when listening to a group conversation. In this paper we examined three-way distributed conversations while varying the presence of spatial video and audio. Our results demonstrate significant benefits to adding spatialized video to an audio conference. Specifically, users perceived that the conversations were of higher quality, they were more engaged, and they were better able to keep track of the conversation. In contrast, no significant benefits were found when mono audio was replaced by spatialized audio. The results of this work are important in that they provide strong evidence for continued exploration of spatialized video, and also suggest that the benefits of spatialized audio may have less of an impact when video is also spatialized.

© All rights reserved Inkpen et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Pahud, Michel, Inkpen, Kori, Benko, Hrvoje, Tang, John C. and Buxton, Bill (2010): Three's company: understanding communication channels in three-way distributed collaboration. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 271-280.

We explore the design of a system for three-way collaboration over a shared visual workspace, specifically in how to support three channels of communication: person, reference, and task-space. In two studies, we explore the implications of extending designs intended for dyadic collaboration to three-person groups, and the role of each communication channel. Our studies illustrate the utility of multiple configurations of users around a distributed workspace, and explore the subtleties of traditional notions of identity, awareness, spatial metaphor, and corporeal embodiments as they relate to three-way collaboration.

© All rights reserved et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Moraveji, Neema, Inkpen, Kori, Cutrell, Ed and Balakrishnan, Ravin (2009): A mischief of mice: examining children's performance in single display groupware systems with 1 to 32 mice. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2157-2166.

Mischief is a system for classroom interaction that allows multiple children to use individual mice and cursors to interact with a single large display [20]. While the system can support large groups of children, it is unclear how children's performance is affected as group size increases. We explore this question via a study involving two tasks, with children working in group sizes ranging from 1 to 32. The first required reciprocal selection of two on-screen targets, resembling a swarm pointing scenario that might be used in educational applications. The second, a more temporally and spatially distributed pointing task, had children entering different words by selecting characters on an on-screen keyboard. Results indicate that performance is significantly affected by group size only when targets are small. Further, group size had a smaller effect when pointing was spatially and temporally distributed than when everyone was concurrently aiming at the same targets.

© All rights reserved Moraveji et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Filho, Jose Eurico de Vasconcelos, Inkpen, Kori and Czerwinski, Mary (2009): Image, appearance and vanity in the use of media spaces and video conference systems. In: GROUP09 - International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2009. pp. 253-262.

Media spaces and videoconference systems are beneficial for connecting separated co-workers and providing rich contextual information. However, image sharing communication tools may also touch on sensitive spots of the human psyche related to personal, perceived image issues (e.g., appearance, self-image, self-presentation and vanity). We conducted two user studies to examine the impact of self-image concerns on the use of media spaces and videoconference systems. Our results suggest that personal, perceived image concerns have a considerable impact on the comfort level of users and may hinder effective communication [8]. We also found that image filtering techniques can help users feel more comfortable. Our results revealed that distortion filters, which are frequently cited to help preserve privacy, do not tend to be the ones preferred by users. Instead, users seemed to favor filters that make subtle changes to their appearance, or, in some instances, they preferred to use a surrogate instead.

© All rights reserved Filho et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Reilly, Derek F., Inkpen, Kori and Watters, Carolyn R. (2009): Controlling, Integrating, and Engaging Context in Urban Computing Research. In: HICSS 2009 - 42st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 5-8 January, 2009, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. pp. 1-10.

 
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Jakobsen, Mikkel R., Fernandez, Roland, Czerwinski, Mary, Inkpen, Kori, Kulyk, Olga and Robertson, George (2009): WIPDash: Work Item and People Dashboard for Software Development Teams. In: Proceedings of INTERACT 2009 12th IFIP TC13 Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009, Uppsala, Sweden. pp. 791-804.

We present WIPDash, a visualization for software development teams designed to increase group awareness of work items and code base activity. WIPDash was iteratively designed by working with two development teams, using interviews, observations, and focus groups, as well as sketches of the prototype. Based on those observations and feedback, we prototyped WIPDash and deployed it with two software teams for a one week field study. We summarize the lessons learned, and include suggestions for a future version.

© All rights reserved Jakobsen et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Tee, Kimberly, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Inkpen, Kori (2009): Exploring communication and sharing between extended families. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 67 (2) pp. 128-138.

In recent years, computer and Internet technologies have broadened the ways that people can stay in touch. Through interviews with parents and grandparents, we examined how people use existing technologies to communicate and share with their extended family. While most of our participants expressed a desire for more communication and sharing with their extended family, many felt that an increase would realistically be difficult to achieve due to challenges such as busy schedules or extended family members' lack of technology use. Our results also highlight the complexity of factors that researchers and designers must understand when attempting to design technology to support and enhance relationships, including trade-offs between facilitating interaction while minimizing new obligations, reducing effort without trivializing communication, and balancing awareness with privacy.

© All rights reserved Tee et al. and/or Academic Press

2008
 
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Moraveji, Neema, Kim, Taemie, Ge, James, Pawar, Udai Singh, Mulcahy, Kathleen and Inkpen, Kori (2008): Mischief: supporting remote teaching in developing regions. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 353-362.

Mischief is a system to support traditional classroom practices between a remote instructor and a group of collocated students. Meant for developing regions, each student in the classroom is given a mouse and these are connected to a single machine and shared display. We present observations of teaching practices in rural Chinese classrooms that led to Mischief's design. Mischief's user interface, with which scores of collocated students can interact simultaneously, supports anonymous responses, communicates focus of attention, and maintains the role of the instructor. Mischief is an extensible platform in which Microsoft PowerPoint slides, used commonly in developing regions, are made interactive. We setup a controlled environment where Mischief was used by classrooms of children with a remote math instructor. The results from the study provided insight into the usability and capacity of the system to support traditional classroom interactions. These observations were also the impetus for a redesign of several components of Mischief and are also presented. These findings contribute both a novel system for synchronous distance education in an affordable manner and design insights for creators of related systems.

© All rights reserved Moraveji et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Biehl, Jacob T., Baker, William T., Bailey, Brian P., Tan, Desney S., Inkpen, Kori and Czerwinski, Mary (2008): Impromptu: a new interaction framework for supporting collaboration in multiple display environments and its field evaluation for co-located software development. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 939-948.

We present a new interaction framework for collaborating in multiple display environments (MDEs) and report results from a field study investigating its use in an authentic work setting. Our interaction framework, IMPROMPTU, allows users to share task information across displays via off-the-shelf applications, to jointly interact with information for focused problem solving and to place information on shared displays for discussion and reflection. Our framework also includes a lightweight interface for performing these and related actions. A three week field study of our framework was conducted in the domain of face-to-face group software development. Results show that teams utilized almost every feature of the framework in support of a wide range of development-related activities. The framework was used most to facilitate opportunistic collaboration involving task information. Teams reported wanting to continue using the framework as they found value in it overall.

© All rights reserved Biehl et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wallace, James R., Mandryk, Regan L. and Inkpen, Kori (2008): Comparing content and input redirection in MDEs. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 157-166.

Designers of Multi-Display Environments (MDEs) often use input redirection to allow users to manipulate content on multiple displays with a single interaction device, but users seated at sub-optimal positions (i.e., not facing the display) may find interaction difficult or frustrating. In collaborative MDEs, users should be able to choose their preferred collaborative arrangement, rather than adjusting to the limitations of the technology. We compare content and input redirection from a variety of seating positions in an MDE. Results from our studies show that content redirection does not suffer from performance loss in sub-optimal seating positions, as opposed to input redirection, which does. Content redirection provides a method for all members of a group to interact with shared content regardless of their position relative to a shared display.

© All rights reserved Wallace et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Reilly, Derek F., MacKay, Bonnie, Watters, Carolyn R. and Inkpen, Kori (2008): Small details: using one device to navigate together. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 253-256.

We present results from a study examining the sensitivity of group navigation strategies to changes in route presentation on a shared mobile device. Two content-equivalent interfaces are compared. An interface providing textual instructions linked to regions on a route map yields reliance on text primarily, encouraging route planning and a divide-and-conquer strategy we term 'navigator and scout'. An interface combining text instructions with map segments on individual pages yields less planning, still permits nav/scout, and sees an increase in an ad-hoc 'sync and go' strategy involving more gathering around the device. Finally, when the route map is used without text, the frequency of the nav/scout strategy drops markedly as sync and go increases.

© All rights reserved Reilly et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Inkpen, Kori and Tee, Kimberly (2008): SPARCS: exploring sharing suggestions to enhance family connectedness. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 629-638.

Staying in touch with extended family members can be a challenge in part because of the time and effort required, even with the help of current technologies. To explore the value of sharing suggestions in sparking communication and facilitating sharing between extended families, we iteratively built SPARCS, a prototype that encourages frequent sharing of photos and calendar information between extended families. Results from a five-week field study with 7 pairs of families highlight a number of important features for an ideal sharing system to help families stay connected, including asynchronous chat and easily configurable sharing suggestions.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Egelman, Serge, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Inkpen, Kori (2008): Family accounts: a new paradigm for user accounts within the home environment. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 669-678.

In this paper we present Family Accounts, a new user account model for shared home computers. We conducted a study with sixteen families, eight who used individual profiles at home, and eight who shared a single profile. Our results demonstrate that Family Accounts is a good compromise between a single shared profile and individual profiles for each family member. In particular, we observed that because Family Accounts allowed individuals to switch profiles without forcing them to interrupt their tasks, family members tended to switch to their own profiles only when a task required some degree of privacy or personalization.

© All rights reserved Egelman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Tan, Desney S., Gergle, Darren, Mandryk, Regan L., Inkpen, Kori, Kellar, Melanie, Hawkey, Kirstie and Czerwinski, Mary (2008): Using job-shop scheduling tasks for evaluating collocated collaboration. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 12 (3) pp. 255-267.

 
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Kellar, Melanie, Hawkey, Kirstie, Inkpen, Kori and Watters, Carolyn R. (2008): Challenges of Capturing Natural Web-Based User Behaviors. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 24 (4) pp. 385-409.

It can be difficult to properly understand aspects of user behavior on the Web without examining the behaviors in a realistic setting, such as through field studies. In this article, an overview of the experiences in augmenting logged data with contextual information over the course of two separate research projects conducted in the field is presented. One project investigated the privacy sensitivity of normal Web browsing, and the other examined user behavior during Web-based information-seeking tasks. Throughout both projects, the contextual information was collected through participant annotations of their Web usage. Based on experiences in conducting this research, implications of methodological decisions are considered, unanswered questions are highlighted, and considerations for other researchers are provided. These shared experiences and perspectives will assist future researchers planning similar field studies, allowing them to build upon the lessons learned.

© All rights reserved Kellar et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

2007
 
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Reilly, Derek F. and Inkpen, Kori (2007): White rooms and morphing don't mix: setting and the evaluation of visualization techniques. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 111-120.

The results presented in this paper illustrate how a specific map visualization technique is sensitive to setting: a comparative evaluation of the technique gives conflicting results depending on where it takes place. While prior research has explored the impact of factors other than basic visual perception on visualization techniques, relatively little attention has been directed toward the physical setting in which the technique is used. We present results from a study involving 120 participants, comparing the effectiveness of two different geovisualization techniques in promoting recall of map layout. Recall was shown to be sensitive to setting, such that one technique in particular was more effective in a noisy public space than in a controlled, 'white-room' environment. The results have implications for the validation and measurement of information visualization techniques as a whole, and in particular for those employing motion as a communicative attribute.

© All rights reserved Reilly and Inkpen and/or ACM Press

 
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Kellar, Melanie, Watters, Carolyn R. and Inkpen, Kori (2007): An exploration of web-based monitoring: implications for design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 377-386.

Monitoring occurs when users return to previously viewed web pages to view new or updated information. While tools exist to support web-based monitoring, we know little about the monitoring activities users engage in and the nature of the support needed. We have conducted 40 semi-structured interviews in order to better understand the types of information users monitor and the characteristics of different monitoring activities. Using the data collected during the interviews, we characterized monitoring as an activity within six web information tasks: Browsing, Communications, Fact Finding, Information Gathering, Maintenance, and Transactions. The results of our study have been used to provide general, as well as task specific, recommendations for the design of monitoring tools.

© All rights reserved Kellar et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hawkey, Kirstie and Inkpen, Kori (2007): PrivateBits: managing visual privacy in web browsers. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Graphics Interface 2007. pp. 215-223.

Privacy can be an issue during collaboration around a personal display when previous browsing activities become visible within web browser features (e.g., AutoComplete). Users currently lack methods to present only appropriate traces of prior activity in these features. In this paper we explore a semi-automatic approach to privacy management that allows users to classify traces of browsing activity and filter them appropriately when their screen is visible by others. We developed PrivateBits, a prototype web browser that instantiates previously proposed general design guidelines for privacy management systems as well as those specific to web browser visual privacy. A preliminary evaluation found this approach to be flexible enough to meet participants' varying privacy concerns, privacy management strategies, and viewing contexts. However, the results also emphasized the need for additional security features to increase trust in the system and raised questions about how to best manage the tradeoff between ease of use and system concealment.

© All rights reserved Hawkey and Inkpen and/or Canadian Information Processing Society

 
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Dearman, David, Inkpen, Kori and Truong, Khai N. (2007): Target selection on mobile devices using display segmentation. In: Cheok, Adrian David and Chittaro, Luca (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2007 September 9-12, 2007, Singapore. pp. 371-374.

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Inkpen, Kori (2007): Yours, Mine and Ours? Sharing and Use of Technology in Domestic Environments. In: Krumm, John, Abowd, Gregory D., Seneviratne, Aruna and Strang, Thomas (eds.) UbiComp 2007 Ubiquitous Computing - 9th International Conference September 16-19, 2007, Innsbruck, Austria. pp. 109-126.

 
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Ziola, Ryder, Kellar, Melanie and Inkpen, Kori (2007): DeskJockey: Exploiting Passive Surfaces to Display Peripheral Information. In: Baranauskas, Maria Cecília Calani, Palanque, Philippe A., Abascal, Julio and Barbosa, Simone Diniz Junqueira (eds.) DEGAS 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services September 11th, 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. pp. 447-460.

2006
 
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Hawkey, Kirstie and Inkpen, Kori (2006): Keeping up appearances: understanding the dimensions of incidental information privacy. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 821-830.

We conducted a survey of 155 participants to examine privacy concerns relating to the viewing of incidental information (i.e. traces of previous activity unrelated to the task at hand) in web browsers. We have identified several dimensions of privacy for this domain. Results revealed the scope of this problem and how location and device affect web browsing activity and contribute to the types of incidental information that may be visible. We found that there are different privacy comfort levels inherent to the participant and dependent on the context of subsequent viewing of incidental information, including the sensitivity of the content, their relationship to the viewer and the level of control retained over input devices.

© All rights reserved Hawkey and Inkpen and/or ACM Press

 
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Mandryk, Regan L., Atkins, M. Stella and Inkpen, Kori (2006): A continuous and objective evaluation of emotional experience with interactive play environments. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 1027-1036.

Researchers are using emerging technologies to develop novel play environments, while established computer and console game markets continue to grow rapidly. Even so, evaluating the success of interactive play environments is still an open research challenge. Both subjective and objective techniques fall short due to limited evaluative bandwidth; there remains no corollary in play environments to task performance with productivity systems. This paper presents a method of modeling user emotional state, based on a user's physiology, for users interacting with play technologies. Modeled emotions are powerful because they capture usability and playability through metrics relevant to ludic experience; account for user emotion; are quantitative and objective; and are represented continuously over a session. Furthermore, our modeled emotions show the same trends as reported emotions for fun, boredom, and excitement; however, the modeled emotions revealed differences between three play conditions, while the differences between the subjective reports failed to reach significance.

© All rights reserved Mandryk et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mandryk, Regan L., Inkpen, Kori and Calvert, Tom W. (2006): Using psychophysiological techniques to measure user experience with entertainment technologies. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 25 (2) pp. 141-158.

Emerging technologies offer exciting new ways of using entertainment technology to create fantastic play experiences and foster interactions between players. Evaluating entertainment technology is challenging because success isn't defined in terms of productivity and performance, but in terms of enjoyment and interaction. Current subjective methods of evaluating entertainment technology aren't sufficiently robust. This paper describes two experiments designed to test the efficacy of physiological measures as evaluators of user experience with entertainment technologies. We found evidence that there is a different physiological response in the body when playing against a computer versus playing against a friend. These physiological results are mirrored in the subjective reports provided by the participants. In addition, we provide guidelines for collecting physiological data for user experience analysis, which were informed by our empirical investigations. This research provides an initial step towards using physiological responses to objectively evaluate a user's experience with entertainment technology.

© All rights reserved Mandryk et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Inkpen, Kori, Dearman, David, Argue, Ritchie, Comeau, Marc, Fu, Ching-Lung, Kolli, Sekhar, Moses, Jeremy, Pilon, Nick and Wallace, James (2006): Left-Handed Scrolling for Pen-Based Devices. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 21 (1) pp. 91-108.

The effectiveness of interaction with mobile devices can be impacted by handedness; however, support for handedness in the interface is rarely provided. The goal of this article is to demonstrate that handedness is a significant interface consideration that should not be overlooked. Four studies were conducted to explore left-handed user interaction with right- or left-aligned scrollbars on personal digital assistants. Analysis of the data shows that left-handed users are able to select targets significantly faster using a left-aligned scrollbar when compared to a right-aligned scrollbar. User feedback also indicated that a left-aligned scrollbar was preferred by left-handed users and provided more natural interaction.

© All rights reserved Inkpen et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Ha, Vicki, Inkpen, Kori, Whalen, Tara and Mandryk, Regan L. (2006): Direct Intentions: The Effects of Input Devices on Collaboration around a Tabletop Display. In: First IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2006 5-7 January, 2006, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 177-184.

 
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Reilly, Derek F., Rodgers, Malcolm E., Argue, Ritchie, Nunes, Mike and Inkpen, Kori (2006): Marked-up maps: combining paper maps and electronic information resources. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 10 (4) pp. 215-226.

 
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Hawkey, Kirstie and Inkpen, Kori (2006): Examining the content and privacy of web browsing incidental information. In: Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2006. pp. 123-132.

This research examines the privacy comfort levels of participants if others can view traces of their web browsing activity. During a week-long field study, participants used an electronic diary daily to annotate each web page visited with a privacy level. Content categories were used by participants to theoretically specify their privacy comfort for each category and by researchers to partition participants' actual browsing. The content categories were clustered into groups based on the dominant privacy levels applied to the pages. Inconsistencies between participants in their privacy ratings of categories suggest that a general privacy management scheme is inappropriate. Participants' consistency within categories suggests that a personalized scheme may be feasible; however a more fine-grained approach to classification is required to improve results for sites that tend to be general, of multiple task purposes, or dynamic in content.

© All rights reserved Hawkey and Inkpen and/or ACM Press

 
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Reilly, Derek F., Dearman, David, Ha, Vicki, Smith, Ian and Inkpen, Kori (2006): "Need to Know": Examining Information Need in Location Discourse. In: Fishkin, Kenneth P., Schiele, Bernt, Nixon, Paddy and Quigley, Aaron J. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2006 - Pervasive Computing 4th International Conference May 7-10, 2006, Dublin, Ireland. pp. 33-49.

2005
 
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Hawkey, Kirstie, Kellar, Melanie, Reilly, Derek, Whalen, Tara and Inkpen, Kori (2005): The proximity factor: impact of distance on co-located collaboration. In: GROUP05: International Conference on Supporting Group Work November 6-9, 2005, Sanibel Island, Florida, USA. pp. 31-40.

Groups collaborating around a large wall display can do so in a variety of arrangements, positioning themselves at different distances from the display and from each other. We examined the impact of proximity on the effectiveness and enjoyment of co-located collaboration. Our results revealed collaborative benefits when participants were positioned close together, and interaction with the display was felt to be more effective when participants were close to the display. However, clear tradeoffs were evident for these configurations. When at a distance to the display, the choice of direct versus indirect interaction revealed that interactions were easier when using direct input but the effectiveness of the collaboration was compromised.

© All rights reserved Hawkey et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hawkey, Kirstie, Inkpen, Kori, Rockwood, Kenneth, McAllister, Michael and Slonim, Jacob (2005): Requirements gathering with alzheimer's patients and caregivers. In: Seventh Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2005. pp. 142-149.

Technology may be able to play a role in improving the quality of life for Alzheimer's patients and their caregivers. We are evaluating the feasibility of an information appliance with the goal of alleviating repetitive questioning behaviour, a contributing factor to caregiver stress. Interviews were conducted with persons with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers to determine the nature of the repetitive questioning behaviour, the information needs of patients, and the interaction abilities of both the patients and the caregivers. We report results of these interviews and discuss the challenges of requirements gathering with persons with Alzheimer's disease and the feasibility of introducing an information appliance to this population.

© All rights reserved Hawkey et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Parker, J. Karen, Mandryk, Regan L. and Inkpen, Kori (2005): TractorBeam: seamless integration of local and remote pointing for tabletop displays. In: Graphics Interface 2005 May 9-11, 2005, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 33-40.

This paper presents a novel interaction technique for tabletop computer displays. When using a direct input device such as a stylus, reaching objects on the far side of a table is difficult. While remote pointing has been investigated for large wall displays, there has been no similar research into reaching distant objects on tabletop displays. Augmenting a stylus to allow remote pointing may facilitate this process. We conducted two user studies to evaluate remote pointing on tabletop displays. Results from our work demonstrate that remote pointing is faster than stylus touch input for large targets, slower for small distant targets, and comparable in all other cases. In addition, when given a choice, people utilized the pointing interaction technique more often than stylus touch. Based on these results we developed the TractorBeam, a hybrid point-touch input technique that allows users to seamlessly reach distant objects on tabletop displays.

© All rights reserved Parker et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Whalen, Tara and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Gathering evidence: use of visual security cues in web browsers. In: Graphics Interface 2005 May 9-11, 2005, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 137-144.

We browsers support secure online transactions, and provide visual feedback mechanisms to inform the user about security. These mechanisms have had little evaluation to determine how easily they are noticed and how effectively they are used. This paper describes a preliminary study conducted to determine which elements are noted, which are ignored, and how easily they are found. We collected eyetracker data to study user's attention to browser security, and gathered additional subjective data through questionnaires. Our results demonstrated that while the lock icon is commonly viewed, its interactive capability is essentially ignored. We also found that certificate information is rarely used, and that people stop looking for security information after they have signed into a site. These initial results provide insights into how browser security cues might be improved.

© All rights reserved Whalen and Inkpen and/or their publisher

 
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Dearman, David, Hawkey, Kirstie and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Rendezvousing with location-aware devices: Enhancing social coordination. In Interacting with Computers, 17 (5) pp. 542-566.

Emerging technologies such as location-awareness devices have the potential to significantly impact users' social coordination, particularly while rendezvousing. It is important that we explore how new technologies influence social behaviours and communication in order to realize their full potential. This paper presents a field study investigating the use of mobile location-aware devices for rendezvous activities. Participants took part in one of three mobile device conditions (a mobile phone, a location-aware handheld, or both a mobile phone and a location-aware handheld) and completed three rendezvousing scenarios. The results reveal key differences in communication patterns between the mediums, as well as the potential strengths and limitations of location-aware devices for social coordination. The paper concludes with a discussion of relevant design issues drawn from observations gathered during the field study.

© All rights reserved Dearman et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Hawkey, Kirstie and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Privacy gradients: exploring ways to manage incidental information during co-located collaboration. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1431-1434.

This research introduces privacy issues related to the viewing of incidental information during co-located collaboration. Web browsers were the representative application used in this research as they have several convenience features that record and display traces of previous web page visits. A one-week field study examined how individuals perceive privacy needs relating to the later incidental viewing of traces of their browsing activity. Participants used a 4-tier privacy gradient to classify the privacy of their actual web browsing. The results revealed per window patterns of privacy during browsing with streaks at given privacy levels and relatively few transitions between levels. Management of incidental information is a complex problem due to multiple viewing contexts, individual differences, and the large volume of information. These privacy patterns suggest that a semi-automated approach to privacy management may be feasible.

© All rights reserved Hawkey and Inkpen and/or ACM Press

 
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Hawkey, Kirstie and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Web browsing today: the impact of changing contexts on user activity. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1443-1446.

Although web browsing behaviour was studied in detail in the mid-to-late 1990s, few recent results have been reported. The nature of web browsing has changed significantly since these early studies, both in the profile of the typical web user and in the context of their browsing (e.g. location, connection speed, web browser features). This paper reports on per-session and per-browser window usage, such as the number of pages visited and the speed of browsing. Some of our findings differ from previously published results that continue to motivate research in this area. Our research indicates that changes in user behaviour, such as the magnitude of web browsing activity, may place restrictions on web-browser related applications.

© All rights reserved Hawkey and Inkpen and/or ACM Press

 
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Kellar, Melanie, Reilly, Derek, Hawkey, Kirstie, Rodgers, Malcolm, MacKay, Bonnie, Dearman, David, Ha, Vicki, MacInnes, W. Joseph, Nunes, Michael, Parker, Karen, Whalen, Tara and Inkpen, Kori (2005): It's a jungle out there: practical considerations for evaluation in the city. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1533-1536.

An essential aspect of mobile and ubiquitous computing research is evaluation within the expected usage context, including environment. When that environment is an urban center, it can be dynamic, expansive, and unpredictable. Methodologies that focus on genuine use in the environment can uncover valuable insights, although they may also limit measurement and control. In this paper, we present our experiences applying traditional experimental techniques for field research in two separate projects set in urban environments. We argue that although traditional methods may be difficult to apply in cities, the challenges are surmountable, and this kind of field research can be a crucial component of evaluation.

© All rights reserved Kellar et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mandryk, Regan L., Rodgers, Malcolm E. and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Sticky widgets: pseudo-haptic widget enhancements for multi-monitor displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1621-1624.

People use multiple monitors to increase their display surface and to facilitate multitasking. However, if windows are maximized to fill one screen, users may have difficulties accessing widgets and tools on the borders of the displays, accidentally crossing over to the other display. To assist users of multi monitor displays, we developed a pseudo-haptic approach to enhance boundary widgets. We compared our sticky widget to a standard widget for two multi monitor display configurations: two identical side-by-side monitors, and two separated monitors of different sizes. Our enhancement improved performance by significantly reducing errors for accessing a boundary widget, reducing the number of accidental crossovers to the wrong display and consequently decreasing selection time.

© All rights reserved Mandryk et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Dearman, David, Hawkey, Kirstie and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Effect of location-awareness on rendezvous behaviour. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1929-1932.

This paper presents an exploratory field study investigating the behavioral effects of mobile location-aware computing on rendezvousing. Participants took part in one of three mobile device conditions (a mobile phone, a location-aware handheld or both a mobile phone and a location-aware handheld) and completed different rendezvousing scenarios. We present one of the scenarios in depth and discuss the effect of location-awareness on rendezvous behaviour.

© All rights reserved Dearman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Parker, J. K., Mandryk, R. L., Nunes, M. N. and Inkpen, Kori (2005): TractorBeam Selection Aids: Improving Target Acquisition for Pointing Input on Tabletop Displays. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT05: Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 80-93.

This paper presents a comparison of several selection aids to improve pointing input on tabletop displays. Our previous research explored the TractorBeam -- a hybrid point-touch interaction technique for tabletop displays. We found that while pointing input was preferred (over touch) by users of tabletop displays, it was slower for small distant targets. Drawing from previous work on improving target acquisition for desktop displays, we developed and tested three selection aids to improve pointing selection of small distant targets on tabletop displays: expanding the cursor, expanding the target, and snapping to the target. Our experiments revealed that all three aids resulted in faster selection times than no selection aid at all, with snapping to the target being the fastest. Additionally, participants liked snapping to the target better than the other selection aids and found it to be the most effective for selecting targets.

© All rights reserved Parker et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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MacKay, Bonnie, Dearman, David, Inkpen, Kori and Watters, Carolyn R. (2005): Walk 'n scroll: a comparison of software-based navigation techniques for different levels of mobility. In: Proceedings of 7th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2005. pp. 183-190.

In this paper, we present a field study comparing software-based navigation techniques (scrollbars, tap-and-drag, and touch-n-go) on mobile devices. In particular, we were interested in exploring the efficiency and user preference of these navigation techniques for different levels of mobility (sitting, walking, and standing) in a naturalistic environment. Results show that while there was no significant difference in performance between tap-and-drag and touch-n-go, both techniques significantly outperformed scrollbars for simple, multi-directional navigation tasks. In addition, the users preferred the touch-n-go technique over the other two methods. The results also revealed that users' interactions and preferences differed between the levels of mobility.

© All rights reserved MacKay et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Reilly, Derek, Welsman-Dinelle, Michael, Bate, Colin and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Just point and click?: using handhelds to interact with paper maps. In: Proceedings of 7th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2005. pp. 239-242.

We present preliminary results from two studies examining the selection techniques suitable for paper maps using handheld computers or cellphones as interaction devices. An informal mockup exploration indicated a strong tendency toward point-and-click style interaction when participants were asked to envision how a range of queries might be expressed. A subsequent study involving a functional prototype and a short training session showed that participants were receptive to other interaction styles, including tracing paths, circling regions, constraining queries with paper menus, and selecting multiple non-adjacent map icons. The contrasting results underline the importance of using a range of design evaluation techniques when developing applications involving handheld devices as interactors.

© All rights reserved Reilly et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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MacKay, Bonnie, Dearman, David, Inkpen, Kori and Watters, Carolyn R. (2005): Walk 'n scroll: a comparison of software-based navigation techniques for different levels of mobility. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Mihalic, Kristijan (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2005 September 19-22, 2005, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 183-190.

 
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Reilly, Derek F., Welsman-Dinelle, Michael, Bate, Colin and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Just point and click?: using handhelds to interact with paper maps. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Mihalic, Kristijan (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2005 September 19-22, 2005, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 239-242.

 
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Reilly, Derek F., Dearman, David, Welsman-Dinelle, Michael and Inkpen, Kori (2005): Evaluating early prototypes in context: trade-offs, challenges, and successes. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (4) pp. 42-50.

2004
 
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Mandryk, Regan L. and Inkpen, Kori (2004): Physiological indicators for the evaluation of co-located collaborative play. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 102-111.

Emerging technologies offer new ways of using entertainment technology to foster interactions between players and connect people. Evaluating collaborative entertainment technology is challenging because success is not defined in terms of productivity and performance, but in terms of enjoyment and interaction. Current subjective methods are not sufficiently robust in this context. This paper describes an experiment designed to test the efficacy of physiological measures as evaluators of collaborative entertainment technologies. We found evidence that there is a different physiological response in the body when playing against a computer versus playing against a friend. These physiological results are mirrored in the subjective reports provided by the participants. We provide an initial step towards using physiological responses to objectively evaluate a user's experience with collaborative entertainment technology.

© All rights reserved Mandryk and Inkpen and/or ACM Press

 
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Scott, Stacey D., Sheelagh, M., Carpendale, T. and Inkpen, Kori (2004): Territoriality in collaborative tabletop workspaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 294-303.

Researchers seeking alternatives to traditional desktop computers have begun exploring the potential collaborative benefits of digital tabletop displays. However, there are still many open issues related to the design of collaborative tabletop interfaces, such as whether these systems should automatically orient workspace items or enforce ownership of workspace content. Understanding the natural interaction practices that people use during tabletop collaboration with traditional media (e.g., pen and paper) can help to address these issues. Interfaces that are modeled on these practices will have the additional advantage of supporting the interaction skills people have developed over years of collaborating at traditional tables. To gain a deeper understanding of these interaction practices we conducted two observational studies of traditional tabletop collaboration in both casual and formal settings. Our results reveal that collaborators use three types of tabletop territories to help coordinate their interactions within the shared tabletop workspace: personal, group, and storage territories. Findings from a spatial analysis of collaborators' tabletop interactions reveal important properties of these tabletop territories. In order to provide a comprehensive picture of the role of tabletop territoriality in collaboration, we conclude with a synthesis of our findings and previous research findings and with several relevant design implications.

© All rights reserved Scott et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Reilly, Derek F. and Inkpen, Kori (2004): Map morphing: making sense of incongruent maps. In: Graphics Interface 2004 May 17-19, 2004, London, Ontario, Canada. pp. 231-238.

Map morphing is an interactive visualization technique that provides a user-controlled, animated translation from one map to another. Traditionally, overlay mechanisms are used to present layers of information over a single projection. Map morphing provides a way to relate maps with significant spatial and schematic differences. This paper presents the morphing technique and the results of a comparative evaluation of map morphing against standard ways of presenting related maps. Our results demonstrate that map morphing provides additional information that can be used to effectively relate maps. In particular, significantly more tasks were completed correctly using the morphing interface than either a windowed or an inset interface.

© All rights reserved Reilly and Inkpen and/or their publisher

2003
 
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Scott, Stacey D., Mandryk, Regan L. and Inkpen, Kori (2003): Understanding children's collaborative interactions in shared environments. In J. Comp. Assisted Learning, 19 (2) pp. 220-228.

2002
 
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Swindells, Colin, Inkpen, Kori, Dill, John C. and Tory, Melanie (2002): That one there! Pointing to establish device identity. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (ed.) Proceedings of the 15th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 27-30, 2002, Paris, France. pp. 151-160.

Computing devices within current work and play environments are relatively static. As the number of 'networked' devices grows, and as people and their devices become more dynamic, situations will commonly arise where users will wish to use 'that device there' instead of navigating through traditional user interface widgets such as lists. This paper describes a process for identifying devices through a pointing gesture using custom tags and a custom stylus called the gesturePen. Implementation details for this system are provided along with qualitative and quantitative results from a formal user study. As ubiquitous computing environments become more pervasive, people will rapidly switch their focus between many computing devices. The results of our work demonstrate that our gesturePen method can improve the user experience in ubiquitous environments by facilitating significantly faster interactions between computing devices.

© All rights reserved Swindells et al. and/or ACM Press

2001
 
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Danesh, Arman, Inkpen, Kori, Lau, Felix, Shu, Keith and Booth, Kellogg S. (2001): Geney: Designing a Collaborative Activity for the Palm Handheld Computer. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 388-395.

This paper describes a project to explore issues surrounding the development of a collaborative handheld educational application for children. A user-centered, iterative design process was used to develop Geney, a collaborative problem solving application to help children explore genetic concepts using Palm handheld computers. The design methodology utilized mock-ups of representative tasks and scenarios, pre-design meetings with targets users, prototype development, and feedback sessions with target users. The results of this work identify an effective way of utilizing handheld computers for collaborative learning and provide important insights into the design of handheld applications for children. This work also illustrates the necessity of user-centered design when new user groups are targeted, especially when novel user interface paradigms are employed that go beyond current windows-based interfaces.

© All rights reserved Danesh et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Shoemaker, Garth B. D. and Inkpen, Kori (2001): Single Display Privacyware: Augmenting Public Displays with Private Information. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 522-529.

The research area of Single Display Groupware (SDG) confronts the standard model of computing interaction, one user working on one computer, by investigating how the best support groups of users interacting with a shared display. One problem that has arisen in SDG research concerns access to private information. Previously, private information could not be displayed on a shared display, it could only be accessed on external devices, such as private monitors or Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs). This paper discusses Single Display Privacyware (SDP), an interaction technique that allows private information to be shown within the context of a shared display. A description of the hardware and software components of our prototype SDP system is given, as are the results of a user study performed to investigate users interacting in the environment. Conclusions concerning future research in the area of SDP are discussed.

© All rights reserved Shoemaker and Inkpen and/or ACM Press

 
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Inkpen, Kori (2001): Drag-and-drop versus point-and-click mouse interaction styles for children. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 8 (1) pp. 1-33.

This research investigates children's use of two common mouse interaction styles, drag-and-drop and point-and-click, to determine whether the choice of interaction style impacts children's performance in interactive learning environments. The interaction styles were experimentally compared to determine if either method was superior to the other in terms of speed, error rate, or user preference, for children. The two interaction styles were also compared based on children's achievement and motivation, within a commercial software environment. Experiment I used an interactive learning environment as children played two versions of an educational puzzle-solving game, each version utilizing a different mouse interaction style; experiment II used a mouse-controlled software environment modeled after the educational game. The results were similar to previous results reported for adults: the point-and-click interaction style was faster; fewer errors were committed using it; and it was preferred over the drag-and-drop interaction style. Within the context of the puzzle-solving game, the children solved significantly fewer puzzles, and they were less motivated using the version that utilized a drag-and-drop interaction style as compared to the version that utilized a point-and-click interaction style. These results were also explored through the use of state-transition diagrams and GOMS models, both of which supported the experimental data gathered.

© All rights reserved Inkpen and/or ACM Press

 
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Kuederle, Oliver, Inkpen, Kori, Atkins, Stella and Carpendale, Sheelagh (2001): Interacting with Image Sequences: Detail-in-Context and Thumbnails. In: Graphics Interface 2001 June 7-9, 2001, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. pp. 111-118.

 
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Druin, Allison and Inkpen, Kori (2001): When are Personal Technologies for Children?. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5 (3) pp. 191-194.

2000
 
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Scott, Stacey D., Shoemaker, Garth B. D. and Inkpen, Kori (2000): Towards Seamless Support of Natural Collaborative Interactions. In: Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2000 May 15-17, 2000, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. pp. 103-110.

1999
 
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Heyden, Johanna E. van der, Inkpen, Kori, Atkins, M. Stella and Carpendale, M. S. T. (1999): A User Centered Task Analysis of Interface Requirements for MRI Viewing. In: Graphics Interface 99 June 2-4, 1999, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. pp. 18-26.

 
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Inkpen, Kori (1999): Designing Handheld Technologies for Kids. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 3 (1) .

1998
 
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Schwartz, Paul, Bricker, Lauren, Campbell, Bruce, Furness, Thomas A., Inkpen, Kori, Matheson, Lydia, Nakamura, Nobutatsu, Shen, Li-Sheng, Tanney, Susan and Yen, Shihming (1998): Virtual playground: architectures for a shared virtual world. In: VRST 1998 1998. pp. 43-50.

1997
 
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Inkpen, Kori, McGrenere, Joanna, Booth, Kellogg S. and Klawe, Maria (1997): The Effect of Turn-Taking Protocols on Children's Learning in Collaborative Environments. In: Graphics Interface 97 May 21-23, 1997, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 138-145.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/kori_inkpen.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2012
Pub. count:70
Number of co-authors:115



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Kirstie Hawkey:12
Regan L. Mandryk:9
David Dearman:9

 

 

Productive colleagues

Kori Inkpen's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ravin Balakrishnan:108
Allison Druin:81
Mary Czerwinski:80
 
 
 
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