Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2012
Pub. count:45
Number of co-authors:54



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gregory D. Abowd:15
David Dearman:11
Gillian R. Hayes:10

 

 

Productive colleagues

Khai N. Truong's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
Kori Inkpen:70
Gillian R. Hayes:39
 
 
 

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Publications by Khai N. Truong (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Hirano, Sen H., Truong, Khai N. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2012): uSmell: a gas sensor system to classify odors in natural, uncontrolled environments. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 657-658.

Smell can be used to infer quite a bit of context about environments. Previous research primarily has shown that gas sensors can be used to discriminate accurately between odors when used in testing chambers. However, potential real-world applications require these sensors to perform an analysis in uncontrolled environments, which can be challenging. In this poster, we present our gas sensor system, called uSmell, to address these challenges. This system has the potential to improve context-aware applications, such as lifelogging and assisted living.

© All rights reserved Hirano et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Yatani, Koji and Truong, Khai N. (2012): BodyScope: a wearable acoustic sensor for activity recognition. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 341-350.

Accurate activity recognition enables the development of a variety of ubiquitous computing applications, such as context-aware systems, lifelogging, and personal health systems. Wearable sensing technologies can be used to gather data for activity recognition without requiring sensors to be installed in the infrastructure. However, the user may need to wear multiple sensors for accurate recognition of a larger number of different activities. We developed a wearable acoustic sensor, called BodyScope, to record the sounds produced in the user's throat area and classify them into user activities, such as eating, drinking, speaking, laughing, and coughing. The F-measure of the Support Vector Machine classification of 12 activities using only our BodyScope sensor was

© All rights reserved Yatani and Truong and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Yatani, Koji, Novati, Michael, Trusty, Andrew and Truong, Khai N. (2011): Review spotlight: a user interface for summarizing user-generated reviews using adjective-noun word pairs. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1541-1550.

Many people read online reviews written by other users to learn more about a product or venue. However, the overwhelming amount of user-generated reviews and variance in length, detail and quality across the reviews make it difficult to glean useful information. In this paper, we present the iterative design of our system, called Review Spotlight. It provides a brief overview of reviews using adjective-noun word pairs, and allows the user to quickly explore the reviews in greater detail. Through a laboratory user study which required participants to perform decision making tasks, we showed that participants could form detailed impressions about restaurants and decide between two options significantly faster with Review Spotlight than with traditional review webpages.

© All rights reserved Yatani et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Dearman, David, Sohn, Timothy and Truong, Khai N. (2011): Opportunities exist: continuous discovery of places to perform activities. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2429-2438.

A rich cognitive map of a space can enhance the individual's experience within the space. However, cognitive maps develop gradually through repeated experience; and because of this, on-demand mobile search services (e.g., Google Maps, Yelp) are often used to compensate for missing knowledge. In this work, we developed and evaluated a context-aware place discovery application called Opportunities Exist to assist in the acquisition of spatial knowledge and meaning. The application differs from traditional search in that places are discovered using an activity (e.g., drink coffee, sit in the sun) and the discovery process runs continuously, maintaining a history of places the user can perform her activities as she goes about her day. We conducted a 4-week deployment in two North American cities. The results show that users were able to discover new places to perform their activities in familiar spaces and learned to associate new activities with familiar places. In addition, participants leveraged the application to perform activities opportunistically, and used continuous place discovery as an opportunistic reminder of routines they wanted to break out of or resume.

© All rights reserved Dearman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Trusty, Andrew and Truong, Khai N. (2011): Augmenting the web for second language vocabulary learning. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3179-3188.

The busyness of everyday life means that those with casual interest in additional learning opportunities are often unable to schedule regular time and effort for studying. In this paper, we explore how to augment information technologies that people use on a daily basis to create micro-learning opportunities. In particular, we examine how a person's existing Web browsing experience-with first language Web pages-can be augmented to teach them second language vocabulary. We present a prototype, ALOE, which runs inside the Firefox Web browser and dynamically augments Web pages by replacing a selected set of English words with their foreign translations. The foreign translations are embedded in the rich context of a Web page's existing English text to promote incidental learning and guessing from context of the translated words. Through a two month user evaluation of ALOE, we found that most participants were able to learn an average of 50 new French vocabulary words.

© All rights reserved Trusty and Truong and/or their publisher

 
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Banovic, Nikola, Li, Frank Chun Yat, Dearman, David, Yatani, Koji and Truong, Khai N. (2011): Design of unimanual multi-finger pie menu interaction. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 120-129.

Context menus, most commonly the right click menu, are a traditional method of interaction when using a keyboard and mouse. Context menus make a subset of commands in the application quickly available to the user. However, on tabletop touchscreen computers, context menus have all but disappeared. In this paper, we investigate how to design context menus for efficient unimanual multi-touch use. We investigate the limitations of the arm, wrist, and fingers and how it relates to human performance of multi-targets selection tasks on multi-touch surface. We show that selecting targets with multiple fingers simultaneously improves the performance of target selection compared to traditional single finger selection, but also increases errors. Informed by these results, we present our own context menu design for horizontal tabletop surfaces.

© All rights reserved Banovic et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Li, Frank Chun Yat, Guy, Richard T., Yatani, Koji and Truong, Khai N. (2011): The 1line keyboard: a QWERTY layout in a single line. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 461-470.

Current soft QWERTY keyboards often consume a large portion of the screen space on portable touchscreens. This space consumption can diminish the overall user experience on these devices. In this paper, we present the 1Line keyboard, a soft QWERTY keyboard that is 140 pixels tall (in landscape mode) and 40% of the height of the native iPad QWERTY keyboard. Our keyboard condenses the three rows of keys in the normal QWERTY layout into a single line with eight keys. The sizing of the eight keys is based on users' mental layout of a QWERTY keyboard on an iPad. The system disambiguates the word the user types based on the sequence of keys pressed. The user can use flick gestures to perform backspace and enter, and tap on the bezel below the keyboard to input a space. Through an evaluation, we show that participants are able to quickly learn how to use the 1Line keyboard and type at a rate of over 30 WPM after just five 20-minute typing sessions. Using a keystroke level model, we predict the peak expert text entry rate with the 1Line keyboard to be 66-68 WPM.

© All rights reserved Li et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Su, Jing, Rosenzweig, Alyssa, Goel, Ashvin, Lara, Eyal de and Truong, Khai N. (2010): Timbremap: enabling the visually-impaired to use maps on touch-enabled devices. In: Proceedings of 12th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2010. pp. 17-26.

Mapping applications on mobile devices have gained widespread popularity as a means for enhancing user mobility and ability to explore new locations and venues. Visually impaired users currently rely on computer text-to-speech or human-spoken descriptions of maps and indoor spaces. Unfortunately, speech-based descriptions are limited in their ability to succinctly convey complex layouts or spacial positioning. This paper presents Timbremap, a sonification interface enabling visually impaired users to explore complex indoor layouts using off-the-shelf touch-screen mobile devices. This is achieved using audio feedback to guide the user's finger on the device's touch interface to convey geometry. Our user-study evaluation shows Timbremap is effective in conveying non-trivial geometry and enabling visually impaired users to explore indoor layouts.

© All rights reserved Su et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Ho, Justin T., Dearman, David and Truong, Khai N. (2010): Improving users' security choices on home wireless networks. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2010. p. 12.

Home networks are common but notoriously difficult to setup and maintain. The difficulty users experience in setting up and maintaining their home network is problematic because of the numerous security threats that can exploit poorly configured and maintained network security. Because there is little empirical data to characterize the usability problems associated with the adoption of wireless network security, we surveyed primary caretakers and users of 20 home networks, examining their perceptions and usage of the security features available to them. We found that users did not understand the difference between access control lists and encryption, and that devices fail to properly notify users of weak security configuration choices. To address these issues, we designed and evaluated a novel wireless router configuration wizard that encouraged strong security choices by improving the network configuration steps. We found that security choices made by users of our wizard resulted in stronger security practices when compared to the wizard from a leading equipment manufacturer.

© All rights reserved Ho et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Dearman, David and Truong, Khai N. (2010): Identifying the activities supported by locations with community-authored content. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 23-32.

Community-authored content, such as location specific reviews, offers a wealth of information about virtually every imaginable location today. In this work, we process Yelp's community-authored reviews to identify a set of potential activities that are supported by the location reviewed. Using 14 test locations we show that the majority of the 40 most common results per location (determined by verb-noun pair frequency) are actual activities supported by

© All rights reserved Dearman and Truong and/or their publisher

 
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Truong, Khai N., Kientz, Julie A., Sohn, Timothy, Rosenzweig, Alyssa, Fonville, Amanda and Smith, Tim (2010): The design and evaluation of a task-centered battery interface. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 341-350.

Battery interfaces provide important feedback about how much time users can continue using their mobile devices. Based on this information, they may develop mental models of the types of activities, tasks, and applications they can use before needing to recharge. Many of today's battery interfaces tend to report energy in coarse granularities or are highly inaccurate. As a result, users may find it difficult to depend on the estimates given. We conducted a survey with 104 participants to understand how users interact with various mobile battery interfaces. Based on the survey results, we designed and prototyped a task-centered battery interface on a mobile device that shows more accurate information about how long individual and combinations of tasks with several applications can be performed. Our pilot study of eight users demonstrated that fine-grained information separated by tasks can help users be more effective with and increase their understanding of their device's battery usage.

© All rights reserved Truong et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Dearman, David and Truong, Khai N. (2010): Why users of yahoo!: answers do not answer questions. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 329-332.

Posing a question to an online question and answer community does not guarantee a response. Significant prior work has explored and identified members' motivations for contributing to communities of collective action (e.g., Yahoo! Answers); in contrast it is not well understood why members choose to not answer a question they have already read. To explore this issue, we surveyed 135 active members of Yahoo! Answers. We show that top and regular contributors experience the same reasons to not answer a question: subject nature and composition of the question; perception of how the questioner will receive, interpret and react to their response; and a belief that their response will lose its meaning and get lost in the crowd if too many responses have already been given. Informed by our results, we discuss opportunities to improve the efficacy of the question and answer process, and to encourage greater contributions through improved design.

© All rights reserved Dearman and Truong and/or their publisher

 
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Scott, Jeremy, Dearman, David, Yatani, Koji and Truong, Khai N. (2010): Sensing foot gestures from the pocket. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 199-208.

Visually demanding interfaces on a mobile phone can diminish the user experience by monopolizing the user's attention when they are focusing on another task and impede accessibility for visually impaired users. Because mobile devices are often located in pockets when users are mobile, explicit foot movements can be defined as eyes-and-hands-free input gestures for interacting with the device. In this work, we study the human capability associated with performing foot-based interactions which involve lifting and rotation of the foot when pivoting on the toe and heel. Building upon these results, we then developed a system to learn and recognize foot gestures using a single commodity mobile phone placed in the user's pocket or in a holster on their hip. Our system uses acceleration data recorded by a built-in accelerometer on the mobile device and a machine learning approach to recognizing gestures. Through a lab study, we demonstrate that our system can classify ten different foot gestures at approximately 86% accuracy.

© All rights reserved Scott et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Li, Frank Chun Yat, Dearman, David and Truong, Khai N. (2010): Leveraging proprioception to make mobile phones more accessible to users with visual impairments. In: Twelfth Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2010. pp. 187-194.

Accessing the advanced functions of a mobile phone is not a trivial task for users with visual impairments. They rely on screen readers and voice commands to discover and execute functions. In mobile situations, however, screen readers are not ideal because users may depend on their hearing for safety, and voice commands are difficult for a system to recognize in noisy environments. In this paper, we extend Virtual Shelves -- an interaction technique that leverages proprioception to access application shortcuts -- for visually impaired users. We measured the directional accuracy of visually impaired participants and found that they were less accurate than people with vision. We then built a functional prototype that uses an accelerometer and a gyroscope to sense its position and orientation. Finally, we evaluated the interaction and prototype by allowing participants to customize the placement of seven shortcuts within 15 regions. Participants were able to access shortcuts in their personal layout with 88.3% accuracy in an average of 1.74 seconds.

© All rights reserved Li et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Chung, Eunyoung, Jensen, Carlos, Yatani, Koji, Kuechler, Victor and Truong, Khai N. (2010): Sketching and Drawing in the Design of Open Source Software. In: Hundhausen, Christopher D., Pietriga, Emmanuel, Diaz, Paloma and Rosson, Mary Beth (eds.) IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing, VL/HCC 2010 21-25 September 2010, 2010, Legans-Madrid, Spain. pp. 195-202.

2009
 
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Wu, Mike, Ranjan, Abhishek and Truong, Khai N. (2009): An exploration of social requirements for exercise group formation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 79-82.

Exercising is often a social activity performed with other people, yet finding compatible exercise partners is difficult in practice. To gain a better understanding of the social requirements involved with forming exercise groups, we conducted a two-phased exploratory study involving an online web questionnaire with 96 respondents and two focus groups. Our results highlight various aspects of collaborating with exercise partners, but also indicate the limited utility of currently available systems to support such collaborations. We discuss implications for collaborative technologies supporting exercise group formation.

© All rights reserved Wu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sellen, Katherine M., Massimi, Micheal A., Lottridge, Danielle M., Truong, Khai N. and Bittle, Sean A. (2009): The people-prototype problem: understanding the interaction between prototype format and user group. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 635-638.

When gathering feedback about an envisioned system, prototypes communicate design ideas to user groups. However, it is unclear how user responses are affected by prototype format. We conducted a 2x2 quasi-experiment (video /storyboard format x older and younger user groups) to test for an interaction between prototype format and user group. We found a significant interaction between prototype format and responses across user groups. Our results indicate that differences in user responses can be misinterpreted as the result of user group characteristics. We advise using multiple prototype formats to counteract a 'media effect'. Alternatively, we advise using storyboards for a smaller 'media effect'.

© All rights reserved Sellen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Yatani, Koji, Chung, Eunyoung, Jensen, Carlos and Truong, Khai N. (2009): Understanding how and why open source contributors use diagrams in the development of Ubuntu. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 995-1004.

Some of the most interesting differences between Open Source Software (OSS) development and commercial co-located software development lie in the communication and collaboration practices of these two groups of developers. One interesting practice is that of diagramming. Though well studied and important in many aspects of co-located software development (including communication and collaboration among developers), its role in OSS development has not been thoroughly studied. In this paper, we report our investigation on how and why Ubuntu contributors use diagrams in their work. Our study shows that diagrams are not actively used in many scenarios where they commonly would in co-located software development efforts. We describe differences in the use and practices of diagramming, their possible reasons, and present design considerations for potential systems aimed at better supporting diagram use in OSS development.

© All rights reserved Yatani et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Li, Frank Chun Yat, Dearman, David and Truong, Khai N. (2009): Virtual shelves: interactions with orientation aware devices. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2009. pp. 125-128.

Triggering shortcuts or actions on a mobile device often requires a long sequence of key presses. Because the functions of buttons are highly dependent on the current application's context, users are required to look at the display during interaction, even in many mobile situations when eyes-free interactions may be preferable. We present Virtual Shelves, a technique to trigger programmable shortcuts that leverages the user's spatial awareness and kinesthetic memory. With Virtual Shelves, the user triggers shortcuts by orienting a spatially-aware mobile device within the circular hemisphere in front of her. This space is segmented into definable and selectable regions along the phi and theta planes. We show that users can accurately point to 7 regions on the theta and 4 regions on the phi plane using only their kinesthetic memory. Building upon these results, we then evaluate a proof-of-concept prototype of the Virtual Shelves using a Nokia N93. The results show that Virtual Shelves is faster than the N93's native interface for common mobile phone tasks.

© All rights reserved Li et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Huang, Elaine M., Yatani, Koji, Truong, Khai N., Kientz, Julie A. and Patel, Shwetak N. (2009): Understanding Mobile Phone Situated Sustainability: The Influence of Local Constraints and Practices on Transferability. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (1) pp. 46-53.

2008
 
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Huang, Elaine M. and Truong, Khai N. (2008): Breaking the disposable technology paradigm: opportunities for sustainable interaction design for mobile phones. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 323-332.

We present a qualitative study of mobile phone ownership, replacement and disposal practices geared towards identifying design opportunities towards sustainable mobile phone interfaces. Our work investigates how people understand the lifespan of their phones, what factors, such as style, service contracts, and functionality, affect how they attribute value to their phones, and their awareness and actions regarding mobile phone sustainability. Our findings reveal the complexity of the actions and decision-making processes involved in phone ownership and replacement. We use these findings to present open areas for sustainable interaction design and generate seed ideas for designs and services to provoke thought and further exploration towards more sustainable mobile phone interfaces and practices.

© All rights reserved Huang and Truong and/or ACM Press

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Gardere, Lamar M., Abowd, Gregory D. and Truong, Khai N. (2008): CareLog: a selective archiving tool for behavior management in schools. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 685-694.

Identifying the function of problem behavior can lead to the development of more effective interventions. One way to identify the function is through functional behavior assessment (FBA). Teachers conduct FBA in schools. However, the task load of recording the data manually is high, and the challenge of accurately identifying antecedents and consequences is significant while interacting with students. These issues often result in imperfect information capture. CareLog allows teachers more easily to conduct FBAs and enhances the capture of relevant information. In this paper, we describe the design process that led to five design principles that governed the development of CareLog. We present results from a five-month, quasi-controlled study aimed at validating those design principles. We reflect on how various constraints imposed by special education settings impact the design and evaluation process for HCI practitioners and researchers.

© All rights reserved Hayes et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cheng, Karen G., Ernesto, Francisco and Truong, Khai N. (2008): Participant and interviewer attitudes toward handheld computers in the context of HIV/AIDS programs in sub-Saharan Africa. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 763-766.

Handheld computers have untapped potential to improve HIV/AIDS programs in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in the collection of survey data. We conducted an experiment in three neighborhoods of Luanda, Angola to assess the impact of the technology on people's comfort and willingness to disclose sensitive personal information, such as sexual behavior. Participants were asked about their HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and practices by local interviewers using either handheld computers or paper surveys. T-tests showed no differences between participants' self-reported comfort across handheld and paper conditions. However, participants in the handheld condition were more likely to give socially desirable responses to the sexual behavior questions than participants in the paper condition. These results suggest that using handheld computers in data collection in sub-Saharan Africa may lead to biased reports of HIV/AIDS-related risk behaviors.

© All rights reserved Cheng et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Dearman, David, Kellar, Melanie and Truong, Khai N. (2008): An examination of daily information needs and sharing opportunities. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 679-688.

A person often has highly context-sensitive information needs that require assistance from individuals in their social network. However, a person's social network is often not broad enough to include the right people in the right situations or circumstances who can satisfy the needs. The ability to satisfy context-sensitive information needs depends on a person's ability to seek the answers from appropriate individuals, who must then provide a response in a timely manner. To gain an understanding of how to better support the sharing of information, we conducted a four-week diary study examining 20 people's perceived daily information needs and sharing desires. We provide a structured framework for understanding the types of information people need and discuss when and how people are able to satisfy their needs. Using these findings, we discuss research and design opportunities for addressing the shortcomings of the existing information sources by connecting information altruists with an audience by leveraging weak ties through situation and circumstance, and providing a timely asynchronous connection to these sources.

© All rights reserved Dearman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Huang, Elaine M. and Truong, Khai N. (2008): Situated sustainability for mobile phones. In Interactions, 15 (2) pp. 16-19.

2007
 
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Dearman, David, Inkpen, Kori and Truong, Khai N. (2007): Target selection on mobile devices using display segmentation. In: Cheok, Adrian David and Chittaro, Luca (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2007 September 9-12, 2007, Singapore. pp. 371-374.

 
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Yatani, Koji and Truong, Khai N. (2007): An evaluation of stylus-based text entry methods on handheld devices in stationary and mobile settings. In: Cheok, Adrian David and Chittaro, Luca (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2007 September 9-12, 2007, Singapore. pp. 487-494.

 
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Dearman, David, Varshavsky, Alex, Lara, Eyal de and Truong, Khai N. (2007): An Exploration of Location Error Estimation. In: Krumm, John, Abowd, Gregory D., Seneviratne, Aruna and Strang, Thomas (eds.) UbiComp 2007 Ubiquitous Computing - 9th International Conference September 16-19, 2007, Innsbruck, Austria. pp. 181-198.

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Poole, Erika Shehan, Iachello, Giovanni, Patel, Shwetak N., Grimes, Andrea, Abowd, Gregory D. and Truong, Khai N. (2007): Physical, Social, and Experiential Knowledge in Pervasive Computing Environments. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (4) pp. 56-63.

 
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LaMarca, Anthony, Langheinrich, Marc and Truong, Khai N. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2007 - Pervasive Computing 5th International Conference May 13-16, 2007, Toronto, Canada.

2006
 
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Iachello, Giovanni, Truong, Khai N., Abowd, Gregory D., Hayes, Gillian R. and Stevens, Molly (2006): Prototyping and sampling experience to evaluate ubiquitous computing privacy in the real world. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 1009-1018.

We developed an inquiry technique, which we called "paratype," based on experience prototyping and event-contingent experience sampling, to survey people in real-life situations about ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) technology. We used this tool to probe the opinions of the conversation partners of users of the Personal Audio Loop, a memory aid that can have a strong impact on their privacy. We present the findings of this study and their implications, specifically the need to broaden public awareness of ubicomp applications and the unfitness of traditional data protection guidelines for tackling the privacy issues of many ubicomp applications. We also point out benefits and methodological issues of paratypes and discuss why they are particularly fit for studying certain classes of mobile and ubicomp applications.

© All rights reserved Iachello et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Truong, Khai N., Hayes, Gillian R. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): Storyboarding: an empirical determination of best practices and effective guidelines. In: Proceedings of DIS06: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2006. pp. 12-21.

Storyboarding is a common technique in HCI and design for demonstrating system interfaces and contexts of use. Despite its recognized benefits, novice designers still encounter challenges in the creation of storyboards. Furthermore, as computing becomes increasingly integrated into the environment, blurring the distinction between the system and its surrounding context, it is imperative to depict context explicitly in storyboards. In this paper, we present two formative studies designed to uncover the important elements of storyboards. These elements include the use of text, inclusion of people, level of detail, number of panels, and representation of the passage of time. We further present an empirical study to assess the effects of these elements on the understanding and enjoyment of storyboard consumers. Finally, we demonstrate how these guidelines were successfully used in an undergraduate HCI class.

© All rights reserved Truong et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Design 4 All: [/encyclopedia/design_4_all.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Design 4 All: [/encyclopedia/design_4_all.html]


 
 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Truong, Khai N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): PowerLine Positioning: A Practical Sub-Room-Level Indoor Location System for Domestic Use. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 441-458.

2005
 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Truong, Khai N., Abowd, Gregory D. and Pering, Trevor (2005): Experience buffers: a socially appropriate, selective archiving tool for evidence-based care. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1435-1438.

Diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of interventions for children with autism can profit most when caregivers have substantial amounts of data they can easily record and review as evidence of specific observed behaviors over time. Through our work with one prototype system and interviews with caregivers, we have recognized the importance of socially appropriate ways to add rich data to the information recorded by caregivers. Analysts must be able to view incidents as they occurred without unnecessarily burdening caregivers and other children with always-on recording of data about them. In this paper, we introduce experience buffers, a collection of capture services embedded in an environment that, though always on and available, require explicit user action to store an experience.. This creates a way to balance the social, technical, and practical concerns of capture applications.

© All rights reserved Hayes et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Truong, Khai N., Patel, Shwetak N., Summet, Jay and Abowd, Gregory D. (2005): Preventing Camera Recording by Designing a Capture-Resistant Environment. In: Beigl, Michael, Intille, Stephen S., Rekimoto, Jun and Tokuda, Hideyuki (eds.) UbiComp 2005 Ubiquitous Computing - 7th International Conference September 11-14, 2005, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 73-86.

 
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Hayes, Gillian R. and Truong, Khai N. (2005): Autism, environmental buffers, and wearable servers. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (2) pp. 14-17.

 
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Abowd, Gregory D., Hayes, Gillian R., Iachello, Giovanni, Kientz, Julie A., Patel, Shwetak N., Stevens, Molly M. and Truong, Khai N. (2005): Prototypes and paratypes: designing mobile and ubiquitous computing applications. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (4) pp. 67-73.

2004
 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Patel, Shwetak N., Truong, Khai N., Iachello, Giovanni, Kientz, Julie A., Farmer, Rob and Abowd, Gregory D. (2004): The Personal Audio Loop: Designing a Ubiquitous Audio-Based Memory Aid. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 168-179.

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Kientz, Julie A., Truong, Khai N., White, David R., Abowd, Gregory D. and Pering, Trevor (2004): Designing Capture Applications to Support the Education of Children with Autism. In: Davies, Nigel, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Siio, Itiro (eds.) UbiComp 2004 Ubiquitous Computing 6th International Conference September 7-10, 2004, Nottingham, UK. pp. 161-178.

 
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Truong, Khai N., Huang, Elaine M. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2004): CAMP: A Magnetic Poetry Interface for End-User Programming of Capture Applications for the Home. In: Davies, Nigel, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Siio, Itiro (eds.) UbiComp 2004 Ubiquitous Computing 6th International Conference September 7-10, 2004, Nottingham, UK. pp. 143-160.

 
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Truong, Khai N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2004): INCA: A Software Infrastructure to Facilitate the Construction and Evolution of Ubiquitous Capture & Access Applications. In: Ferscha, Alois and Mattern, Friedemann (eds.) PERVASIVE 2004 - Pervasive Computing, Second International Conference April 21-23, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 140-157.

2003
 
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Macedo, Alessandra Alaniz, Truong, Khai N., Camacho-Guerrero, Jose Antonio and Pimentel, Maria da Graca (2003): Automatically sharing web experiences through a hyperdocument recommender system. In: Proceedings of the Fourteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2003. pp. 48-56.

As an approach that applies not only to support user navigation on the Web, recommender systems have been built to assist and augment the natural social process of asking for recommendations from other people. In a typical recommender system, people provide suggestions as inputs, which the system aggregates and directs to appropriate recipients. In some cases, the primary computation is in the aggregation; in others, the value of the system lies in its ability to make good matches between the recommenders and those seeking recommendations. In this paper, we discuss the architectural and design features of WebMemex, a system that (a) provides recommended information based on the captured history of navigation from a list of people well-known to the users -- including the users themselves, (b) allows users to have access from any networked machine, (c) demands user authentication to access the repository of recommendations and (d) allows users to specify when the capture of their history should be performed.

© All rights reserved Macedo et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Stevens, Molly M., Abowd, Gregory D., Truong, Khai N. and Vollmer, Florian (2003): Getting into the Living Memory Box: Family archives & holistic design. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 7 (3) pp. 210-216.

2001
 
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Truong, Khai N., Abowd, Gregory D. and Brotherton, Jason A. (2001): Who, What, When, Where, How: Design Issues of Capture & Access Applications. In: Abowd, Gregory D., Brumitt, Barry and Shafer, Steven A. (eds.) Ubicomp 2001 Ubiquitous Computing - Third International Conference September 30 - October 2, 2001, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 209-224.

1999
 
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Truong, Khai N., Abowd, Gregory D. and Brotherton, Jason (1999): Personalizing the Capture of Public Experiences. In: Zanden, Brad Vander and Marks, Joe (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 07 - 10, 1999, Asheville, North Carolina, United States. pp. 121-130.

In this paper, we describe our work on developing a system to support the personalization of a captured public experience. Specifically, we are interested in providing students with the ability to personalize the capture of the lecture experiences as part of the Classroom 2000 project. We discuss the issues and challenges involved in designing a system that performs live integration of personal streams of information with multiple other streams of information made available to it through an environment designed to capture public information.

© All rights reserved Truong et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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