Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:23
Number of co-authors:42



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Thad Starner:13
James Clawson:6
Daniel Ashbrook:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Kent Lyons's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Julie A. Jacko:84
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
Thad Starner:49
 
 
 

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Kent Lyons

Personal Homepage:
berkeley.intel-research.net/~klyons/


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Publications by Kent Lyons (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Lyons, Kent, Nguyen, David, Ashbrook, Daniel and White, Sean (2012): Facet: a multi-segment wrist worn system. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 123-130.

We present Facet, a multi-display wrist worn system consisting of multiple independent touch-sensitive segments joined into a bracelet. Facet automatically determines the pose of the system as a whole and of each segment individually. It further supports multi-segment touch, yielding a rich set of touch input techniques. Our work builds on these two primitives to allow the user to control how applications use segments alone and in coordination. Applications can expand to use more segments, collapses to encompass fewer, and be swapped with other segments. We also explore how the concepts from Facet could apply to other devices in this design space.

© All rights reserved Lyons et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Ashbrook, Daninel and Lyons, Kent (2010): Ensembles of on-body devices. In: Proceedings of 12th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2010. pp. 503-504.

With the continuing miniaturization of powerful computation into mobile devices, there exists an opportunity for re-envisioning how we interact with our personal technology. In addition to a core computational/interaction component such as a mobile phone, there could be substantial benefit to a user by offering an ensemble of multiple mobile devices that can be used together. Such devices could provide novel input or output capabilities, or distribute user interactions in a more effective way. Our goal with this proposed workshop is to foster discussion about what possibilities such collections of devices might offer.

© All rights reserved Ashbrook and Lyons and/or their publisher

 
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Pering, Trevor, Lyons, Kent, Want, Roy, Murphy-Hoye, Mary, Baloga, Mark, Noll, Paul, Branc, Joe and Benoist, Nicolas De (2010): What do you bring to the table?: investigations of a collaborative workspace. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 183-192.

Collaborative spaces supporting personal mobile devices provide for a powerful integration of personalized content with supportive embedded infrastructure. Social, spatial, and informational considerations have a salient impact on such modern collaborative spaces. The design, implementation, and evaluation of a collaborative workspace prototype that directly supports the integrated use of mobile devices not only yields insights into the basic capabilities behind such a space, but also a deeper understanding of the different composition control mechanisms available. Specifically, such environments can effectively work with existing laptop platforms, and show increased promise for supporting future generations of smaller mobile devices.

© All rights reserved Pering et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Lukowicz, Paul and Lyons, Kent (2010): ISWC 09: 13th International Symposium on Wearable Computers. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 9 (2) pp. 6-7.

2009
 
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Patel, Nirmal, Clawson, James, Voida, Amy and Lyons, Kent (2009): Mobiphos: A study of user engagement with a mobile collocated-synchronous photo sharing application. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 67 (12) pp. 1048-1059.

Photographs have always been artifacts for creating memories and engaging in storytelling activities with others. To date there has been much research in the HCI community towards sharing of both analog and digital photographs. With recent advances in network technology further research has been done with photos being shared almost immediately after capture. However, most of the research has focused on synchronous sharing with groups of distributed users and little has been done to focus on how synchronous capture and sharing could benefit a group of collocated mobile users. To help start exploration in this area we have created Mobiphos. In this article we present how synchronous capture and sharing affects how groups of mobile, collocated users engage with their environment and each other while touring a city. We also discuss the design guidelines of Mobiphos and the implications for future photoware for the mobile, collocated context.

© All rights reserved Patel et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Randell, Cliff, Want, Roy, Lyons, Kent and Smailagic, Asim (2009): International Symposium on Wearable Computing (ISWC) 2008. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (1) pp. 14-17.

2008
 
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Ashbrook, Daniel L., Clawson, James R., Lyons, Kent, Starner, Thad and Patel, Nirmal (2008): Quickdraw: the impact of mobility and on-body placement on device access time. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 219-222.

We investigate the effect of placement and user mobility on the time required to access an on-body interface. In our study, a wrist-mounted system was significantly faster to access than a device stored in the pocket or mounted on the hip. In the latter two conditions, 78% of the time it took to access the device was spent retrieving the device from its holder. As mobile devices are beginning to include peripherals (for example, Bluetooth headsets and watches connected to a mobile phone stored in the pocket), these results may help guide interface designers with respect to distributing functions across the body between peripherals.

© All rights reserved Ashbrook et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Clawson, James, Lyons, Kent, Rudnick, Alex, Iannucci, Robert A. and Starner, Thad (2008): Automatic whiteout++: correcting mini-QWERTY typing errors using keypress timing. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 573-582.

By analyzing features of users' typing, Automatic Whiteout++ detects and corrects up to 32.37% of the errors made by typists while using a mini-QWERTY (RIM Blackberry style) keyboard. The system targets "off-by-one" errors where the user accidentally presses a key adjacent to the one intended. Using a database of typing from longitudinal tests on two different keyboards in a variety of contexts, we show that the system generalizes well across users, model of keyboard, user expertise, and keyboard visibility conditions. Since a goal of Automatic Whiteout++ is to embed it in the firmware of mini-QWERTY keyboards, it does not rely on a dictionary. This feature enables the system to correct errors mid-word instead of applying a correction after the word has been typed. Though we do not use a dictionary, we do examine the effect of varying levels of language context in the system's ability to detect and correct erroneous keypresses.

© All rights reserved Clawson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ashbrook, Daniel, Lyons, Kent and Starner, Thad (2008): An investigation into round touchscreen wristwatch interaction. In: Hofte, G. Henri ter, Mulder, Ingrid and Ruyter, Boris E. R. de (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2008 September 2-5, 2008, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. pp. 311-314.

 
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Clawson, James, Voida, Amy, Patel, Nirmal J. and Lyons, Kent (2008): Mobiphos: a collocated-synchronous mobile photo sharing application. In: Hofte, G. Henri ter, Mulder, Ingrid and Ruyter, Boris E. R. de (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2008 September 2-5, 2008, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. pp. 187-195.

2007
 
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Clarkson, Edward, Lyons, Kent, Clawson, James and Starner, Thad (2007): Revisiting and validating a model of two-thumb text entry. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 163-166.

MacKenzie and Soukoreff have previously introduced a Fitts' Law-based performance model of expert two-thumb text entry on mini-QWERTY keyboards [4]. In this work we validate the original model using results from a longitudinal study of mini-QWERTY keyboards, and update the model to account for observed inter-key time data.

© All rights reserved Clarkson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Lyons, Kent, Brashear, Helene, Westeyn, Tracy L., Kim, Jung Soo and Starner, Thad (2007): GART: The Gesture and Activity Recognition Toolkit. In: Jacko, Julie A. (ed.) HCI International 2007 - 12th International Conference - Part III 2007. pp. 718-727.

2006
 
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Lyons, Kent, Starner, Thad and Gane, Brian (2006): Experimental Evaluations of the Twiddler One-Handed Chording Mobile Keyboard. In Human-Computer Interaction, 21 (4) pp. 343-392.

The HandyKey Twiddler is a one-handed chording mobile keyboard that employs a 3 x 4 button design, similar to that of a standard mobile telephone. We present a longitudinal study of novice users' learning rates on the Twiddler. Ten participants typed for 20 sessions using 2 different text entry methods. Each session was composed of 20 min of typing with multitap and 20 min of one-handed chording on the Twiddler. We found that users initially had a faster average typing rate with multitap; however, after 4 sessions the difference became negligible, and by the 8th session participants typed faster with chording on the Twiddler. Five participants continued our study and achieved an average rate of 47 words per minute (wpm) after approximately 25 hr of practice in varying conditions. One participant achieved an average rate of 67 wpm, equivalent to the typing rate of the 2nd author, who has been a Twiddler user for 10 years. We analyze the effects of learning on various aspects of chording, provide evidence that lack of visual feedback does not hinder expert typing speed, and examine the potential use of multicharacter chords (MCCs) to increase text entry speed. Finally, we explore improving novice user's experience with the Twiddler through the use of a chording tutorial.

© All rights reserved Lyons et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Vadas, Kristin, Patel, Nirmal, Lyons, Kent, Starner, Thad and Jacko, Julie A. (2006): Reading on-the-go: a comparison of audio and hand-held displays. In: Proceedings of 8th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2006. pp. 219-226.

In this paper we present a 20-participant controlled experiment to evaluate and compare a head-down visual display and a synthesized speech audio display for comprehending text while mobile. Participants completed reading comprehension trials while walking a path and sitting. We examine overall performance and perceived workload for four conditions: audio-walking, audio-sitting, visual-walking, and visual-sitting. Results suggest audio is an acceptable modality for mobile comprehension of text. Participants' comprehension scores for the audio-walking condition were comparable to the scores for the visual-walking condition. More importantly, participants saw improvements in their ability to navigate the environment when using the audio display.

© All rights reserved Vadas et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Vadas, Kristin, Patel, Nirmal J., Lyons, Kent, Starner, Thad and Jacko, Julie A. (2006): Reading on-the-go: a comparison of audio and hand-held displays. In: Nieminen, Marko and Rykkee, Mika (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006 September 12-15, 2006, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 219-226.

 
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Ashbrook, Daniel, Lyons, Kent and Clawson, James (2006): Capturing Experiences Anytime, Anywhere. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5 (2) pp. 8-11.

2005
 
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Clarkson, Edward, Clawson, James, Lyons, Kent and Starner, Thad (2005): An empirical study of typing rates on mini-QWERTY keyboards. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1288-1291.

We present a longitudinal study of mini-QWERTY keyboard use, examining the learning rates of novice mini-QWERTY users. The study consists of 20 twenty-minute typing sessions using two different-sized keyboard models. Subjects average over 31 words per minute (WPM) for the first session and increase to an average of 60 WPM by the twentieth. Individual subjects also exceed the upper bound of 60.74 WPM suggested by MacKenzie and Soukoreff's model of two-thumb text entry [5]. We discuss our results in the context of this model.

© All rights reserved Clarkson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Lyons, Kent, Skeels, Christopher and Starner, Thad (2005): Providing support for mobile calendaring conversations: a wizard of oz evaluation of dual-purpose speech. In: Proceedings of 7th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2005. pp. 243-246.

We present a Wizard of Oz evaluation of dual-purpose speech, a technique designed to provide support during a face-to-face conversation by leveraging a user's conversational speech for input. With a dual-purpose speech interaction, the user's speech is meaningful in the context of a human-to-human conversation while providing useful input to a computer. For our experiment, we evaluate the ability to schedule appointments with our calendaring application, the Calendar Navigator Agent. We examine the relative difference between using speech for input compared to traditional pen input on a PDA. We found that speech is more direct and our participants can use their conversational speech for computer input. In doing so, we reduce the manual input needed to operate a PDA while engaged in a calendaring conversation.

© All rights reserved Lyons et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Lyons, Kent, Skeels, Christopher and Starner, Thad (2005): Providing support for mobile calendaring conversations: a wizard of oz evaluation of dual--purpose speech. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Mihalic, Kristijan (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2005 September 19-22, 2005, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 243-246.

2004
 
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Lyons, Kent, Starner, Thad, Plaisted, Daniel, Fusia, James, Lyons, Amanda, Drew, Aaron and Looney, E. W. (2004): Twiddler typing: one-handed chording text entry for mobile phones. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 671-678.

An experienced user of the Twiddler, a one-handed chording keyboard, averages speeds of 60 words per minute with letter-by-letter typing of standard test phrases. This fast typing rate coupled with the Twiddler's 3x4 button design, similar to that of a standard mobile telephone, makes it a potential alternative to multi-tap for text entry on mobile phones. Despite this similarity, there is very little data on the Twiddler's performance and learnability. We present a longitudinal study of novice users' learning rates on the Twiddler. Ten participants typed for 20 sessions using two different methods. Each session is composed of 20 minutes of typing with multi-tap and 20 minutes of one-handed chording on the Twiddler. We found that users initially have a faster average typing rate with multi-tap; however, after four sessions the difference becomes negligible, and by the eighth session participants type faster with chording on the Twiddler. Furthermore, after 20 sessions typing rates for the Twiddler are still increasing.

© All rights reserved Lyons et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Lyons, Kent, Skeels, Christopher, Starner, Thad, Snoeck, Cornelis M., Wong, Benjamin A. and Ashbrook, Daniel (2004): Augmenting conversations using dual-purpose speech. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 237-246.

In this paper, we explore the concept of dual-purpose speech: speech that is socially appropriate in the context of a human-to-human conversation which also provides meaningful input to a computer. We motivate the use of dual-purpose speech and explore issues of privacy and technological challenges related to mobile speech recognition. We present three applications that utilize dual-purpose speech to assist a user in conversational tasks: the Calendar Navigator Agent, DialogTabs, and Speech Courier. The Calendar Navigator Agent navigates a user\'s calendar based on socially appropriate speech used while scheduling appointments. DialogTabs allows a user to postpone cognitive processing of conversational material by proving short-term capture of transient information. Finally, Speech Courier allows asynchronous delivery of relevant conversational information to a third party.

© All rights reserved Lyons et al. and/or ACM Press

2003
 
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Lyons, Kent (2003): Everyday Wearable Computer Use: A Case Study of an Expert User. In: Chittaro, Luca (ed.) Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - 5th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2003 September 8-11, 2003, Udine, Italy. pp. 61-75.

2002
 
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Huang, Elaine M., Terry, Michael A., Mynatt, Elizabeth D., Lyons, Kent and Chen, Alan (2002): Distributing Event Information by Simulating Word-of-Mouth Exchanges. In: Paterno, Fabio (ed.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - 4th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2002 September 18-20, 2002, Pisa, Italy. pp. 60-68.

 
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Changes to this page (author)

23 Nov 2012: Modified
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/kent_lyons.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:23
Number of co-authors:42



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Thad Starner:13
James Clawson:6
Daniel Ashbrook:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Kent Lyons's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Julie A. Jacko:84
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
Thad Starner:49
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
go to course
The Psychology of Online Sales: The Beginner's Guide
Starts the day after tomorrow !
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading