Publication statistics

Pub. period:1996-2009
Pub. count:14
Number of co-authors:23



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

George W. Furnas:
David Bacon:
Jonathan Meyer:

 

 

Productive colleagues

Ken Perlin's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Benjamin B. Beders..:70
James D. Hollan:49
George W. Furnas:28
 
 
 

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Ken Perlin

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Publications by Ken Perlin (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Rosenberg, Ilya D., Grau, Alexander, Hendee, Charles, Awad, Nadim and Perlin, Ken (2009): IMPAD: an inexpensive multi-touchpressure acquisition device. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3217-3222. Available online

Recently, there has been great interest in multi-touch interfaces. These have taken the form of optical systems such as Microsoft Surface and Perceptive Pixel's FTIR display as well as hand-held devices using capacitive sensors such as the Apple iPhone. However, optical systems are inherently bulky while capacitive systems are only practical in small form factors and are limited in their application because they only respond to human touch. We have created a technology that enables the creation of Inexpensive Multi-Touch Pressure Acquisition Devices (IMPAD) which are paper-thin, flexible and can easily scale down to fit on a portable device or scale up to cover an entire table. These devices can sense varying levels of pressure at a resolution high enough to sense and distinguish multiple fingertips, the tip of a pen or pencil and other objects. Other potential applications include writing pads, floor mats and entry indicators, bio-pressure sensors, musical instruments, baby monitoring, drafting tables, reconfigurable control panels, inventory tracking, portable electronic devices, hospital beds, construction materials, wheelchairs, sports equipment, sports clothing and tire pressure sensing.

© All rights reserved Rosenberg et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Resnick, Mitchel, Flanagan, Mary, Kelleher, Caitlin, MacLaurin, Matthew, Ohshima, Yoshiki, Perlin, Ken and Torres, Robert (2009): Growing up programming: democratizing the creation of dynamic, interactive media. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3293-3296. Available online

Young people interact with games, animations, and simulations all of the time. But few of them are able to create interactive media. The obstacle: traditional programming languages are too difficult to learn and understand. This panel brings together a group of researchers, developers, and educators who are aiming to democratize the activity of programming. They are developing a new generation of programming environments that enable children and teens to create their own interactive games, stories, animations, and simulations. Panelists will discuss and critique their programming environments, then set up interactive demonstration stations for focused exploration and small-group discussion. Audience members will also have the opportunity to download the environments onto their own laptops, so that they can experiment in greater depth.

© All rights reserved Resnick et al. and/or ACM Press

2006
 
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Perlin, Ken (2006): Computer graphics and the illusion of life. In: Braz, Jos, Jorge, Joaquim A., Dias, Miguel and Marcos, Adrito (eds.) GRAPP 2006 - Proceedings of the First International Conference on Computer Graphics Theory and Applications February 25-28, 2006, Setbal, Portugal. .

 
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Perlin, Ken (2006): Computer graphics and the illusion of life. In: Ranchordas, Alpesh, Arajo, Helder and Encarnao, Bruno (eds.) VISAPP 2006 - Proceedings of the First International Conference on Computer Vision Theory and Applications - 2 Volumes 2006, Setbal, Portugal. pp. 1-2.

2005
 
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Perlin, Ken, Flanagan, Mary and Hollingshead, Andrea (2005): The Rapunsel Project. In: Subsol, Grard (ed.) ICVS 2005 - Virtual Storytelling, Using Virtual Reality Technologies for Storytelling, Third International Conference November 30 - December 2, 2005, Strasbourg, France. pp. 251-259. Available online

 
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Perlin, Ken (2005): Toward Interactive Narrative. In: Subsol, Grard (ed.) ICVS 2005 - Virtual Storytelling, Using Virtual Reality Technologies for Storytelling, Third International Conference November 30 - December 2, 2005, Strasbourg, France. pp. 135-147. Available online

2004
 
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Rosenfeld, Dan, Zawadzki, Michael, Sudol, Jeremi and Perlin, Ken (2004): Physical Objects as Bidirectional User Interface Elements. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 24 (1) pp. 44-49. Available online

2003
 
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Perlin, Ken (2003): Building Virtual Actors Who Can Really Act. In: Balet, Olivier, Subsol, Grard and Torguet, Patrice (eds.) ICVS 2003 - Virtual Storytelling; Using Virtual Reality Technologies for Storytelling, Second International Conference November 20-21, 2003, Toulouse, France. pp. 127-134. Available online

2002
 
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Perlin, Ken (2002): Better acting in computer games: the use of procedural methods. In Computers & Graphics, 26 (1) pp. 3-11. Available online

 
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Velho, Luiz, Perlin, Ken, Biermann, Henning and Ying, Lexing (2002): Algorithmic shape modeling with subdivision surfaces. In Computers & Graphics, 26 (6) pp. 865-875. Available online

2001
 
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Perlin, Ken (2001): . In: Graphics Interface 2001 June 7-9, 2001, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. pp. -.

1999
 
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Perlin, Ken and Meyer, Jon (1999): Nested User Interface Components. In: Zanden, Brad Vander and Marks, Joe (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 07 - 10, 1999, Asheville, North Carolina, United States. pp. 11-18. Available online

Nested User Interface Components combine the concepts of Zooming User Interfaces (ZUIs) with recursive nesting of active graphical user interface widgets. The resulting system of recursively nesting interface components has a number of desirable properties. The level of detail of the view of any widget component and its children, as well as the responsiveness of that component to the user's actions, can be tuned to the current visible size of that component on the screen. We distinguish between the interaction style of a component, and the semantic result that it produces. Only the latter is used to determine the geographic parameters for that component. In this way, very large and layered control problems can be presented to the user as a cohesive and readily navigable visual surface. It becomes straightforward to layout interaction semantics that are best handled by recursion, such as filters composed of nested expressions.

© All rights reserved Perlin and Meyer and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Perlin, Ken (1998): Quikwriting: Continuous Stylus-Based Text Entry. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 215-216. Available online

We present a "heads-up" shorthand for entering text on a stylus-based computer very rapidly. The innovations are that (i) the stylus need never be lifted from the surface, and that (ii) the user need never stop moving the stylus. Continuous multi-word text of arbitrary length can be written fluidly, even as a single continuous gesture if desired.

© All rights reserved Perlin and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Bederson, Benjamin B., Hollan, James D., Perlin, Ken, Meyer, Jonathan, Bacon, David and Furnas, George W. (1996): Pad++: A Zoomable Graphical Sketchpad For Exploring Alternate Interface Physics. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 7 (1) pp. 3-32.

 
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