Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2012
Pub. count:6
Number of co-authors:13



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Xiaomu Zhou:4
Mark S. Ackerman:4
Prudence Dalrymple:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Kai Zheng's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Mark S. Ackerman:67
Michael McQuaid:7
Xiaomu Zhou:5
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
UI Design Patterns for Successful Software
88% booked. Starts in 7 days
go to course
Affordances: Designing Intuitive User Interfaces
87% booked. Starts in 8 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Kai Zheng

 

Publications by Kai Zheng (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Zhou, Xiaomu, Zheng, Kai, Ackerman, Mark S. and Hanauer, David (2012): Cooperative documentation: the patient problem list as a nexus in electronic health records. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 911-920. Available online

The patient Problem List (PL) is a mandated documentation component of electronic health records supporting the longitudinal summarization of patient information in addition to facilitating the coordination of care by multidisciplinary medical teams. In this paper, we report an ethnographic study that examined the institutionalization of the PL. Specifically, we explored: (1) how different groups (primary care providers, inpatient hospitalists, specialists, and emergency doctors) perceived the purposes of the PL differently; (2) how these deviated perceptions might affect their use of the PL; and (3) how the technical design of the PL facilitated or hindered the clinical practices of these groups. We found significant ambiguity regarding the definition, benefits, and use of the PL across different groups. We also found that certain groups (e.g. primary care providers) had developed effective cooperative strategies regarding the use of the PL; however, suboptimal usage was common among other user types, which could have a profound impact on quality of care and safety. Based on these findings, we provide suggestions to improve the design of the PL, particularly on strengthening its support on longitudinal and cooperative clinical practices.

© All rights reserved Zhou et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
Edit | Del

Zhou, Xiaomu, Ackerman, Mark S. and Zheng, Kai (2011): CPOE workarounds, boundary objects, and assemblages. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3353-3362. Available online

We conducted an ethnographically based study at a large teaching hospital to examine clinician workarounds engendered by the adoption of a Computerized Prescribe Order Entry (CPOE) system. Specifically, we investigated how adoption of computerized systems may alter medical practice, order management in particular, as manifested through the working-around behavior developed by doctors and nurses to accommodate the changes in their day-to-day work environment. In this paper, we focus on clinicians' workarounds, including those workarounds that gradually disappeared and those that have become routinized. Further, we extend the CSCW concept of boundary object (to "assemblage") in order to understand the workarounds created with CPOE system use and the changing nature of clinical practices that are increasingly computerized.

© All rights reserved Zhou et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Jones, Peter, Cronin, David, Karavite, Dean, Koppel, Ross, Dalrymple, Prudence, Zheng, Kai, Rogers, Michelle and Schumacher, Bob (2011): Designing for whole systems and services in healthcare. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 359-362. Available online

This CHI 2011 SIG provides a workshop for collective problem finding and community identification. The goal is to initiate a working group to coordinate systemic design research issues across practitioner communities. This SIG addresses the insufficiency of user-centered design and informatics research to design for system and service-level innovations in healthcare. The SIG seeks to coordinate communications and participation across design practice, research disciplines, and areas of health practice for service system innovation.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
Edit | Del

Zhou, Xiaomu, Ackerman, Mark S. and Zheng, Kai (2010): Doctors and psychosocial information: records and reuse in inpatient care. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1767-1776. Available online

We conducted a field-based study at a large teaching hospital to examine doctors' use and documentation of patient care information, with a special focus on a patient's psychosocial information. We were particularly interested in the gaps between the medical work and any representations of the patient. The paper describes how doctors record this information for immediate and long-term use. We found that doctors documented a considerable amount of psychosocial information in their electronic health records (EHR) system. Yet, we also observed that such information was recorded selectively, and a medicalized view-point is a key contributing factor. Our study shows how missing or problematic representations of a patient affect work activities and patient care. We accordingly suggest that EHR systems could be made more usable and useful in the long run, by supporting both representations of medical processes and of patients.

© All rights reserved Zhou et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
Edit | Del

Zhou, Xiaomu, Ackerman, Mark S. and Zheng, Kai (2009): I just don't know why it's gone: maintaining informal information use in inpatient care. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2061-2070. Available online

We conducted a field-based study examining informal nursing information. We examined the use of this information before and after the adoption of a CPOE (Computerized Provider Order Entry) system in an inpatient unit of a large teaching hospital. Before CPOE adoption, nurses used paper working documents to detail psycho-social information about patients; after the CPOE adoption, they did not use paper or digital notes as was planned. The paper describes this process and analyses how several interlocked reasons contributed to the loss of this information in written form. We found that a change in physical location, sufficient convenience, visibility of the information, and permanency of information account for some, but not all, of the outcome. As well, we found that computerization of the nursing data led to a shift in the politics of the information itself -- the nurses no longer had a cohesive agreement about the kinds of data to enter into the system. The findings address the requirements of healthcare computerization to support both formal and informal work practices, respecting the nature of nursing work and the politics of information inherent in complex medical work.

© All rights reserved Zhou et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

McQuaid, Michael, Zheng, Kai, Melville, Nigel and Green, Lee (2009): Usable deidentification of sensitive patient care data. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 31. Available online

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/kai_zheng.html