Publication statistics

Pub. period:2005-2012
Pub. count:15
Number of co-authors:21



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

George Fitzmaurice:9
Tovi Grossman:9
George W. Fitzmaurice:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Justin Matejka's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Bill Buxton:78
Gordon Kurtenbach:45
Tovi Grossman:44
 
 
 

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Justin Matejka

 

Publications by Justin Matejka (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Banovic, Nikola, Grossman, Tovi, Matejka, Justin and Fitzmaurice, George (2012): Waken: reverse engineering usage information and interface structure from software videos. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 83-92. Available online

We present Waken, an application-independent system that recognizes UI components and activities from screen captured videos, without any prior knowledge of that application. Waken can identify the cursors, icons, menus, and tooltips that an application contains, and when those items are used. Waken uses frame differencing to identify occurrences of behaviors that are common across graphical user interfaces. Candidate templates are built, and then other occurrences of those templates are identified using a multi-phase algorithm. An evaluation demonstrates that the system can successfully reconstruct many aspects of a UI without any prior application-dependant knowledge. To showcase the design opportunities that are introduced by having this additional meta-data, we present the Waken Video Player, which allows users to directly interact with UI components that are displayed in the video.

© All rights reserved Banovic et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Bi, Xiaojun, Grossman, Tovi, Matejka, Justin and Fitzmaurice, George (2011): Magic desk: bringing multi-touch surfaces into desktop work. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2511-2520. Available online

Despite the prominence of multi-touch technologies, there has been little work investigating its integration into the desktop environment. Bringing multi-touch into desktop computing would give users an additional input channel to leverage, enriching the current interaction paradigm dominated by a mouse and keyboard. We provide two main contributions in this domain. First, we describe the results from a study we performed, which systematically evaluates the various potential regions within the traditional desktop configuration that could become multi-touch enabled. The study sheds light on good or bad regions for multi-touch, and also the type of input most appropriate for each of these regions. Second, guided by the results from our study, we explore the design space of multi-touch-integrated desktop experiences. A set of new interaction techniques are coherently integrated into a desktop prototype, called Magic Desk, demonstrating potential uses for multi-touch enabled desktop configurations.

© All rights reserved Bi et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Matejka, Justin, Grossman, Tovi and Fitzmaurice, George (2011): Ambient help. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2751-2760. Available online

In this paper we present Ambient Help, a system that supports opportunistic learning by providing automatic, context-sensitive learning resources while a user works. Multiple videos and textual help resources are presented ambiently on a secondary display. We define and examine a collection of design consideration for this type of interface. After describing our implementation details, we report on an experiment which shows that Ambient Help supports finding more helpful information, while not having a negative impact on the user's productivity, as compared to a traditional help condition.

© All rights reserved Matejka et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Matejka, Justin, Grossman, Tovi and Fitzmaurice, George (2011): IP-QAT: in-product questions, answers, & tips. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 175-184. Available online

We present IP-QAT, a new community-based question and answer system for software users. Unlike most community forums, IP-QAT is integrated into the actual software application, allowing users to easily post questions, answers and tips without having to leave the application. Our in-product implementation is context-aware and shows relevant posts based on a user's recent activity. It is also designed with minimal transaction costs to encourage users to easily post, include annotated images and file attachments, as well as tag their posts with relevant UI components. We describe a robust cloud-based system implementation, which allowed us to release IP-QAT to 37 users for a 2 week field study. Our study showed that IP-QAT increased user contributions, and subjectively, users found our system more useful and easier to use, in comparison to the existing commercial discussion board.

© All rights reserved Matejka et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Li, Wei, Grossman, Tovi, Matejka, Justin and Fitzmaurice, George (2011): TwitApp: in-product micro-blogging for design sharing. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 185-194. Available online

We describe TwitApp, an enhanced micro-blogging system integrated within AutoCAD for design sharing. TwitApp integrates rich content and still keeps the sharing transaction cost low. In TwitApp, tweets are organized by their project, and users can follow or unfollow each individual project. We introduce the concept of automatic tweet drafting and other novel features such as enhanced real-time search and integrated live video streaming. The TwitApp system leverages the existing Twitter micro-blogging system. We also contribute a study which provides insights on these concepts and associated designs, and demonstrates potential user excitement of such tools.

© All rights reserved Li et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ekstrand, Michael, Li, Wei, Grossman, Tovi, Matejka, Justin and Fitzmaurice, George (2011): Searching for software learning resources using application context. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 195-204. Available online

Users of complex software applications frequently need to consult documentation, tutorials, and support resources to learn how to use the software and further their understanding of its capabilities. Existing online help systems provide limited context awareness through "what's this?" and similar techniques. We examine the possibility of making more use of the user's current context in a particular application to provide useful help resources. We provide an analysis and taxonomy of various aspects of application context and how they may be used in retrieving software help artifacts with web browsers, present the design of a context-aware augmented web search system, and describe a prototype implementation and initial user study of this system. We conclude with a discussion of open issues and an agenda for further research.

© All rights reserved Ekstrand et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Grossman, Tovi, Matejka, Justin and Fitzmaurice, George (2010): Chronicle: capture, exploration, and playback of document workflow histories. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 143-152. Available online

We describe Chronicle, a new system that allows users to explore document workflow histories. Chronicle captures the entire video history of a graphical document, and provides links between the content and the relevant areas of the history. Users can indicate specific content of interest, and see the workflows, tools, and settings needed to reproduce the associated results, or to better understand how it was constructed to allow for informed modification. Thus, by storing the rich information regarding the document's history workflow, Chronicle makes any working document a potentially powerful learning tool. We outline some of the challenges surrounding the development of such a system, and then describe our implementation within an image editing application. A qualitative user study produced extremely encouraging results, as users unanimously found the system both useful and easy to use.

© All rights reserved Grossman et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Matejka, Justin, Grossman, Tovi, Lo, Jessica and Fitzmaurice, George W. (2009): The design and evaluation of multi-finger mouse emulation techniques. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1073-1082. Available online

We explore the use of multi-finger input to emulate full mouse functionality, such as the tracking state, three buttons, and chording. We first present the design space for such techniques, which serves as a guide for the systematic investigation of possible solutions. We then perform a series of pilot studies to come up with recommendations for the various aspects of the design space. These pilot studies allow us to arrive at a recommended technique, the SDMouse. In a formal study, the SDMouse was shown to significantly improve performance in comparison to previously developed mouse emulation techniques.

© All rights reserved Matejka et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Matejka, Justin, Li, Wei, Grossman, Tovi and Fitzmaurice, George (2009): CommunityCommands: command recommendations for software applications. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2009. pp. 193-202. Available online

We explore the use of modern recommender system technology to address the problem of learning software applications. Before describing our new command recommender system, we first define relevant design considerations. We then discuss a 3 month user study we conducted with professional users to evaluate our algorithms which generated customized recommendations for each user. Analysis shows that our item-based collaborative filtering algorithm generates 2.1 times as many good suggestions as existing techniques. In addition we present a prototype user interface to ambiently present command recommendations to users, which has received promising initial user feedback.

© All rights reserved Matejka et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Khan, Azam, Matejka, Justin, Fitzmaurice, George, Kurtenbach, Gord, Burtnyk, Nicolas and Buxton, Bill (2009): Toward the Digital Design Studio: Large Display Explorations. In Human-Computer Interaction, 24 (1) pp. 9-47. Available online

Inspired by our automotive and product design customers using large displays in design centers, visualization studios, and meeting rooms around the world, we have been exploring the use and potential of large display installations for almost a decade. Our research has touched on many aspects of this rich design space, from individual tools to complete systems, and has generally moved through the life cycle of a design artifact: from the creation phase, through communication and collaboration, to presentation and dissemination. As we attempt to preserve creative flow through the phases, we introduce social structures and constraints that drive the design of possible point solutions in the larger context of a digital design studio trail environment built in the lab. Although many of the interactions presented are viable across several design phases, this article focuses primarily on facilitating collaboration. We conclude with critical lessons learned of both what avenues have been fruitful and which roads to avoid. This article lightly covers the whole design process and attempts to inform readers of key factors to consider when designing for designers.

© All rights reserved Khan et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

2008
 
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Fitzmaurice, George W., Matejka, Justin, Khan, Azam, Glueck, Mike and Kurtenbach, Gordon (2008): PieCursor: merging pointing and command selection for rapid in-place tool switching. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1361-1370. Available online

We describe a new type of graphical user interface widget called the "PieCursor." The PieCursor is based on the Tracking Menu technique and consists of a radial cluster of command wedges, is roughly the size of a cursor, and replaces the traditional cursor. The PieCursor technique merges the normal cursor function of pointing with command selection into a single action. A controlled experiment was conducted to compare the performance of rapid command and target selection using the PieCursor against larger versions of Tracking Menus and a status quo Toolbar configuration. Results indicate that for small clusters of tools (4 and 8 command wedges) the PieCursor can outperform the toolbar by 20.8% for coarse pointing. For fine pointing, the performance of the PieCursor degrades approximately to the performance found for the Toolbar condition.

© All rights reserved Fitzmaurice et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Fitzmaurice, George W., Matejka, Justin, Mordatch, Igor, Khan, Azam and Kurtenbach, Gordon (2008): Safe 3D navigation. In: Haines, Eric and McGuire, Morgan (eds.) Proceedings of the 2008 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, SI3D 2008, February 15-17, 2008, Redwood City, CA, USA 2008. pp. 7-15. Available online

 
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Khan, Azam, Mordatch, Igor, Fitzmaurice, George W., Matejka, Justin and Kurtenbach, Gordon (2008): ViewCube: a 3D orientation indicator and controller. In: Haines, Eric and McGuire, Morgan (eds.) Proceedings of the 2008 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, SI3D 2008, February 15-17, 2008, Redwood City, CA, USA 2008. pp. 17-25. Available online

2005
 
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Khan, Azam, Matejka, Justin, Fitzmaurice, George W. and Kurtenbach, Gordon (2005): Spotlight: directing users' attention on large displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 791-798. Available online

We describe a new interaction technique, called a spotlight, for directing the visual attention of an audience when viewing data or presentations on large wall-sized displays. A spotlight is simply a region of the display where the contents are displayed normally while the remainder of the display is somewhat darkened. In this paper we define the behavior of spotlights, show unique affordances of the technique, and discuss design characteristics. We also report on experiments that show the benefit of using the spotlight a large display and standard desktop configuration. Our results suggest that the spotlight is preferred over the standard cursor and outperforms it by a factor of 3.4 on a wall-sized display.

© All rights reserved Khan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Yankelovich, Nicole, Wessler, Mike, Kaplan, Jonathan, Provino, Joe, Simpson, Nigel, Haberl, Karl and Matejka, Justin (2005): Office central. In: Proceedings of the Conference on Designing for User Experiences DUX05 2005. p. 52. Available online

Using Office Central, remote workers can "advertise" their presence in public spaces within offices, such as break areas, lounges or cafeterias. The design concept is to encourage informal, unplanned interactions between remote workers and those who pass through the public spaces. In this prototype installation at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA, we set up a lounge area with an Office Central picture window display (Figure 1). The local people in the lounge, wearing RFID tags for identification, could chat informally with remote people using a high-fidelity, CD-quality audio channel. The virtual meeting places included audio and video content, designed to be experienced jointly by the local and remote people. Some content was also tailored to the local people, updating as they approached the picture window display.

© All rights reserved Yankelovich et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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