Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2011
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:19



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Teemu Tuomas Ahmaniemi:
Thomas Olsson:
Jani Heikkinen:

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jukka Raisamo's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Roope Raisamo:53
Veikko Surakka:28
Grigori Evreinov:9
 
 
 

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Jukka Raisamo

 

Publications by Jukka Raisamo (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Lylykangas, Jani, Surakka, Veikko, Salminen, Katri, Raisamo, Jukka, Laitinen, Pauli, Ronning, Kasper and Raisamo, Roope (2011): Designing tactile feedback for piezo buttons. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3281-3284. Available online

The present aim was to study the preference of tactile feedback stimulations given by non-physical (i.e., solid) piezo-actuated buttons. Participants (n=16) ranked 16 different tactile feedback stimuli varied by 4 output delays and 4 vibration durations. The results showed that the mean ranks of the stimuli differed significantly from each other. The timing parameters of delay and duration interacted with each other, for example, so that preference of certain vibration duration fluctuated in response to different output delays. Using a very short time window (i.e., 10-453 ms) combining both delay and duration parameters of the feedback could result either in favorable or significantly less favorable subjective experience. The results suggest that a preferred perception of tactile feedback from non-physical buttons requires careful design and controlling of the timing parameters.

© All rights reserved Lylykangas et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Salminen, Katri, Surakka, Veikko, Raisamo, Jukka, Lylykangas, Jani, Pystynen, Johannes, Raisamo, Roope, Mkel, Kalle and Ahmaniemi, Teemu (2011): Emotional responses to thermal stimuli. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2011. pp. 193-196. Available online

The present aim was to study if thermal stimuli presented to the palm can affect emotional responses when measured with emotion related subjective rating scales and changes in skin conductance response (SCR). Two target temperatures, cold and warm, were created by either decreasing or increasing the temperature of the stimulus 4 C in respect to the participants current hand temperature. Both cold and warm stimuli were presented by using two presentation methods, i.e., dynamic and pre-adjusted. The results showed that both the dynamic and pre-adjusted warm stimuli elevated the ratings of arousal and dominance. In addition, the pre-adjusted warm and cold stimuli elevated the SCR. The results suggest that especially pre-adjusted warm stimuli can be seen as effective in activating the autonomic nervous system and arousal and dominance dimensions of the affective rating space.

© All rights reserved Salminen et al. and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Lylykangas, Jani, Surakka, Veikko, Rantala, Jussi, Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope and Tuulari, Esa (2009): Vibrotactile information for intuitive speed regulation. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 112-119. Available online

The present aim was to investigate if controlled vibrotactile stimulation can be used to inform users on how to regulate their behavior. 36 stimuli were varied by frequency modulation (i.e., ascending, constant, and descending), duration (i.e., 500, 1750, and 3000 ms), waveform (i.e., sine and sawtooth), and body location (i.e., wrist and chest), and presented to 12 participants. The participants were to evaluate without any training the meaning of each presented stimuli using three response options: 'accelerate your speed', 'keep your speed constant', and 'decelerate your speed'. Participants rated also how emotionally pleasant and arousing the different stimulations were. The results showed that the stimuli were predominantly perceived analogously with the vibration frequency modulation. The best stimuli represented 'accelerate your speed', 'keep your speed constant', and 'decelerate your speed' information in

© All rights reserved Lylykangas et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Heikkinen, Jani, Rantala, Jussi, Olsson, Thomas, Raisamo, Roope, Lylykangas, Jani, Raisamo, Jukka, Surakka, Veikko and Ahmaniemi, Teemu Tuomas (2009): Enhancing personal communication with spatial haptics: Two scenario-based experiments on gestural interaction. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 20 (5) pp. 287-304. Available online

 
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Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope and Surakka, Veikko (2009): Evaluating the effect of temporal parameters for vibrotactile saltatory patterns. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2009. pp. 319-326. Available online

Cutaneous saltation provides interesting possibilities for applications. An illusion of vibrotactile mediolateral movement was elicited to a left dorsal forearm to investigate emotional (i.e., pleasantness) and cognitive (i.e., continuity) experiences to vibrotactile stimulation. Twelve participants were presented with nine saltatory stimuli delivered to a linearly aligned row of three vibrotactile actuators separated by 70 mm in distance. The stimuli were composed of three temporal parameters of 12, 24 and 48 ms for both burst duration and inter-burst interval to form all nine possible uniform pairs. First, the stimuli were ranked by the participants using a special three-step procedure. Second, the participants rated the stimuli using two nine-point bipolar scales measuring the pleasantness and continuity of each stimulus, separately. The results showed especially the interval between two successive bursts was a significant factor for saltation. Moreover, the temporal parameters seemed to affect more the experienced continuity of the stimuli compared to pleasantness. These findings encourage us to continue to further study the saltation and the effect of different parameters for subjective experience.

© All rights reserved Raisamo et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Salminen, Katri, Surakka, Veikko, Lylykangas, Jani, Raisamo, Jukka, Saarinen, Rami, Raisamo, Roope, Rantala, Jussi and Evreinov, Grigori (2008): Emotional and behavioral responses to haptic stimulation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1555-1562. Available online

A prototype of friction-based horizontally rotating fingertip stimulator was used to investigate emotional experiences and behavioral responses to haptic stimulation. The rotation style of 12 different stimuli was varied by burst length (i.e., 20, 50, 100 ms), continuity (i.e., continuous and discontinuous), and direction (e.g., forward and backward). Using these stimuli 528 stimulus pairs were presented to 12 subjects who were to distinguish if stimuli in each pair were the same or different. Then they rated the stimuli using four scales measuring the pleasantness, arousal, approachability, and dominance qualities of the 12 stimuli. The results showed that continuous forward-backward rotating stimuli were rated as significantly more unpleasant, arousing, avoidable, and dominating than other types of stimulations (e.g., discontinuous forward rotation). The reaction times to these stimuli were significantly faster than reaction times to discontinuous forward and backward rotating stimuli. The results clearly suggest that even simple haptic stimulation can carry emotional information. The results can be utilized when making use of haptics in human-technology interaction.

© All rights reserved Salminen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pakkanen, Toni, Lylykangas, Jani, Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope, Salminen, Katri, Rantala, Jussi and Surakka, Veikko (2008): Perception of low-amplitude haptic stimuli when biking. In: Digalakis, Vassilios, Potamianos, Alexandros, Turk, Matthew, Pieraccini, Roberto and Ivanov, Yuri (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2008 October 20-22, 2008, Chania, Crete, Greece. pp. 281-284. Available online

 
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Toyssy, Sampo, Raisamo, Jukka and Raisamo, Roope (2008): Telling Time by Vibration. In: Ferre, Manuel (ed.) EuroHaptics 2008 - Haptics Perception, Devices and Scenarios - 6th International Conference June 10-13, 2008, Madrid, Spain. pp. 924-929. Available online

 
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Pakkanen, Toni, Lylykangas, Jani, Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope, Salminen, Katri, Rantala, Jussi and Surakka, Veikko (2008): Perception of low-amplitude haptic stimuli when biking. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2008. pp. 281-284. Available online

Haptic stimulation in motion has been studied only little earlier. To provide guidance for designing haptic interfaces for mobile use we carried out an initial experiment using C-2 actuators. 16 participants attended in the experiment to find out whether there is a difference in perceiving low-amplitude vibrotactile stimuli when exposed to minimal and moderate physical exertion. A stationary bike was used to control the exertion. Four body locations (wrist, leg, chest and back), two stimulus durations (1000 ms and 2000 ms) and two motion conditions with the stationary bicycle (still and moderate pedaling) were applied. It was found that cycling had significant effect on both the perception accuracy and the reaction times with selected stimuli. Stimulus amplitudes used in this experiment can be used to help haptic design for mobile users.

© All rights reserved Pakkanen et al. and/or their publisher

2004
 
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Raisamo, Jukka and Raisamo, Roope (2004): Enhancing Interactive Graph Manipulation Tools with Tactile Feedback. In: Masoodian, Masood, Jones, Steve and Rogers, Bill (eds.) Computer Human Interaction 6th Asia Pacific Conference - APCHI 2004 June 29 - July 2, 2004, Rotorua, New Zealand. pp. 359-368. Available online

 
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Raisamo, Jukka, Raisamo, Roope and Krkkinen, Pivi (2004): A Method for Interactive Graph Manipulation. In: IV 2004 - 8th International Conference on Information Visualisation 14-16 July, 2004, London, UK. pp. 581-587. Available online

 
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