Publication statistics

Pub. period:2010-2011
Pub. count:6
Number of co-authors:6



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Aurélien Tabard:3
Gloria Mark:2
Jakob Bardram:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Juan David Hincapié-Ramos's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gloria Mark:51
Jakob E. Bardram:32
Tomas Sokoler:20
 
 
 

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Juan David Hincapié-Ramos

 

Publications by Juan David Hincapié-Ramos (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Hincapié-Ramos, Juan David, Tabard, Aurélien and Bardram, Jakob E. (2011): Mediated tabletop interaction in the biology lab: exploring the design space of the rabbit. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 301-310. Available online

Interactive surfaces like diffuse illumination tabletops (DIT) identify and track objects using multiple techniques like shape and color recognition, fiducial markers, electronic components, and RFID tags. However, tracking becomes more complex when dealing with multiple small objects of similar form. We propose to use tangible mediators for integrating such objects to tabletops. This paper reports on our initial explorations of mediated tabletop interaction consisting of a mediator prototype and a design space definition. We built a mediator, the Rabbit, a device that translates the value of an RFID tag into a visual 2D code. The Rabbit rests on the interactive surface, holds the object, reads its passive RFID tag, and converts the read value into a 2D code that can be read by the DIT's built-in camera. When handling multiple objects, the Rabbit iterates through the generated 2D codes. Through a series of participatory activities with end users (molecular biologists), we collected initial feedback from participants and defined a design space for mediated tabletop interaction.

© All rights reserved Hincapié-Ramos et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hincapié-Ramos, Juan David, Voida, Stephen and Mark, Gloria (2011): Sharing availability information with InterruptMe. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 477-478. Available online

Workplace collaboration often requires interruptions, which can happen at inopportune times. Sharing availability information can reduce many of these untimely interruptions. However, designing a successful availability-sharing system requires finding the right balance to maximize the benefits and reduce costs for both the interrupter and interruptee. The main challenges for finding such balance lie in the acquisition of availability information from the interruptee and its delivery to the interrupter. In this demonstration, we show how common technical approaches in ubicomp can address some of the problems typically encountered in availability sharing. We present InterruptMe, a novel availability sharing system that uses sensor information to calculate multiple availability measures for each interruptee and that delivers this information in the periphery of the interrupter's attention by using a projected peripheral display and monitoring implicit inputs to the system.

© All rights reserved Hincapié-Ramos et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hincapié-Ramos, Juan David, Voida, Stephen and Mark, Gloria (2011): A design space analysis of availability-sharing systems. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 85-96. Available online

Workplace collaboration often requires interruptions, which can happen at inopportune times. Designing a successful availability-sharing system requires finding the right balance to optimize the benefits and reduce costs for both the interrupter and interruptee. In this paper, we examine the design space of availability-sharing systems and identify six relevant design dimensions: abstraction, presentation, information delivery, symmetry, obtrusiveness and temporal gradient. We describe these dimensions in terms of the tensions between interrupters and interruptees revealed in previous studies of workplace collaboration and deployments of awareness systems. As a demonstration of the utility of our design space, we introduce InterruptMe, a novel availability-sharing system that represents a previously unexplored point in the design space and that balances the tensions between interrupters and interruptees. InterruptMe differs from previous systems in that it displays availability information only when needed by monitoring implicit inputs from the system's users, implements a traceable asymmetry structure, and introduces the notion of per-communications channel availability.

© All rights reserved Hincapié-Ramos et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Hincapié-Ramos, Juan David, Tabard, Aurélien and Bardram, Jakob (2010): Designing for the invisible: user-centered design of infrastructure awareness systems. In: Proceedings of DIS10 Designing Interactive Systems 2010. pp. 302-305. Available online

Infrastructure awareness systems reveal invisible aspects of infrastructures to their existing or potential users. Designing such systems is challenging as it requires making visible the hidden activity of infrastructures while providing information of interest to the users. To address this challenge we introduce the AMC technique (for Awareness Model Cards). This technique relies conceptually on awareness model's concepts of nimbus and focus. The main objective is to match the users' interests to the information the infrastructure awareness systems can provide, through the use of card matching. This technique provides three benefits: 1) evaluate how relevant is the information displayed by infrastructure awareness systems; 2) identify which of users' interests infrastructure awareness systems do not take into account; 3) identify elements of re-design in the infrastructures themselves, so to improve their adoption.

© All rights reserved Hincapié-Ramos et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hincapié-Ramos, Juan David (2010): Infrastructure awareness. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 465-468. Available online

Ubiquitous Computing designs infrastructures that weave into the fabric of everyday life, and become invisible by fading in the background. However, this invisibility keeps users from understanding and adopting them. To address this problem we introduce the notion of Infrastructure Awareness (IA). IA is the user's awareness about properties of an infrastructure. Our hypothesis is that IA facilitates the users' understanding of infrastructures, and thereby supports their adoption. This dissertation investigates three dimensions of IA: conceptual, methodological, and technological. The conceptual dimension defines IA in terms of an awareness model and a design space. The methodological dimension reflects on the usage of user-centred design when designing for invisibility, and proposes a new user-centred design activity for IA systems. The technological dimension creates two proof-of-concept applications, GridOrbit and GridNotify, to illustrate the notion of IA systems.

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Hincapié-Ramos, Juan David, Tabard, Aurélien, Bardram, Jakob and Sokoler, Tomas (2010): GridOrbit public display: providing grid awareness in a biology laboratory. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3265-3270. Available online

We introduce GridOrbit, a public awareness display that visualizes the activity of a community grid used in a biology laboratory. This community grid executes bioinformatics algorithms and relies on users to donate CPU cycles to the grid. The goal of GridOrbit is to create a shared awareness about the research taking place in the biology laboratory. This should promote contributions to the grid, and thereby mediate the appropriation of the grid technology. GridOrbit visualizes the activity in the grid, shows information about the different active projects, and supports a messaging functionality where people comment on projects. Our work explores the usage of interactive technologies as enablers for the appropriation of an otherwise invisible infrastructure.

© All rights reserved Hincapié-Ramos et al. and/or their publisher

 
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