Publication statistics

Pub. period:1993-2009
Pub. count:15
Number of co-authors:23



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Christian Heath:12
Mike Fraser:6
Paul Luff:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jon Hindmarsh's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Benford:121
Chris Greenhalgh:61
Christian Heath:45
 
 
 

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Jon Hindmarsh

Has also published under the name of:
"J. Hindmarsh"

 

Publications by Jon Hindmarsh (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Tutt, Dylan and Hindmarsh, Jon (2009): The Screen Deconstructed: Video-based studies of the malleable screen. In: Vannini, Phillip (ed.). "Material Culture and Technology in Everyday Life: Ethnographic Approaches".

2007
 
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Lehn, Dirk vom, Hindmarsh, Jon, Luff, Paul and Heath, Christian (2007): Engaging constable: revealing art with new technology. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1485-1494. Available online

Museums increasingly deploy new technologies to enhance visitors' experience of their exhibitions. They primarily rely on touch-screen computer systems, PDAs and digital audio-guides. Tate Britain recently employed two innovative systems in one of their major exhibitions of John Constable's work; a gestural interface and a touch-screen panel, both connected to large projection screens. This paper reports on the analysis of video-recordings and field observations of visitors' action and interaction. It explores how people interact with and around the systems, how they configure the space around the installation and how they examine and discover their properties. It suggests that designers of interfaces and installations developed for museum exhibitions face particular challenges, such as the transparency of the relationship between people's actions and the system' response, the provision of opportunities for individual and collaborative experiences and the interweaving of technological and aesthetic experiences.

© All rights reserved Lehn et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Tutt, Dylan, Hindmarsh, Jon, Shaukat, Muneeb and Fraser, Mike (2007): The Distributed Work of Local Action: Interaction amongst virtually collocated research teams. In: Proceedings of the Tenth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2007. pp. 199-218. Available online

Existing research on synchronous remote working in CSCW has highlighted the troubles that can arise because actions at one site are (partially) unavailable to remote colleagues. Such 'local action' is routinely characterised as a nuisance, a distraction, subordinate and the like. This paper explores interconnections between 'local action' and 'distributed work' in the case of a research team virtually collocated through 'MiMeG'. MiMeG is an e-Social Science tool that facilitates 'distributed data sessions' in which social scientists are able to remotely collaborate on the real-time analysis of video data. The data are visible and controllable in a shared workspace and participants are additionally connected via audio conferencing. The findings reveal that whilst the (partial) unavailability of local action is at times problematic, it is also used as a resource for coordinating work. The paper considers how local action is interactionally managed in distributed data sessions and concludes by outlining implications of the analysis for the design and study of technologies to support group-to-group collaboration.

© All rights reserved Tutt et al. and/or Springer

2006
 
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Fraser, Mike, Hindmarsh, Jon, Best, Katie, Heath, Christian, Biegel, Greg, Greenhalgh, Chris and Reeves, Stuart (2006): Remote Collaboration Over Video Data: Towards Real-Time e-Social Science. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 15 (4) pp. 257-279. Available online

The design of distributed systems to support collaboration among groups of scientists raises new networking challenges that grid middleware developers are addressing. This field of development work, 'e-Science', is increasingly recognising the critical need of understanding the ordinary day-to-day work of doing research to inform design. We have investigated one particular area of collaborative social scientific work -- the analysis of video data. Based on interviews and observational studies, we discuss current practices of social scientific work with digital video in three areas: Preparation for collaboration; Control of data and application; and Annotation configurations and techniques. For each, we describe how these requirements feature in our design of a distributed video analysis system as part of the MiMeG project: our security policy and distribution; the design of the control system; and providing freeform annotation over data. Finally, we review our design in light of initial use of the software between project partners; and discuss how we might transform the spatial configuration of the system to support annotation behaviour.

© All rights reserved Fraser et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

2005
 
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Hindmarsh, Jon, Heath, Christian, Lehn, Dirk vom and Cleverly, Jason (2005): Creating Assemblies in Public Environments: Social Interaction, Interactive Exhibits and CSCW. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 14 (1) pp. 1-41. Available online

This paper examines the use of a series of three low tech interactive assemblies that have been exhibited by the authors in a range of fairs, expositions and galleries. The paper does not present novel technical developments, but rather uses the low tech assemblies to help scope out the design space for CSCW in museums and galleries and to investigate the ways in which people collaboratively encounter and explore technological exhibits in museums and galleries. The bulk of the paper focuses on the analysis of the use of one interactive installation that was exhibited at the Sculpture, Objects and Functional Art (SOFA) Exposition in Chicago, USA. The study uses audio-visual recordings of interaction with and around the work to consider how people, in and through their interaction with others, make sense of an assembly of traditional objects and video technologies. The analysis focuses on the organised practices of assembly and how assembling the relationship between different parts of the work is interactionally accomplished. The analysis is then used to develop a series of design sensitivities to inform the development of technological assemblies to engender informal interaction and sociability in museums and galleries.

© All rights reserved Hindmarsh et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

2003
 
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Luff, Paul, Heath, Christian, Kuzuoka, Hideaki, Hindmarsh, Jon, Yamazaki, Keiichi and Oyama, Shinya (2003): Fractured Ecologies: Creating Environments for Collaboration. In Human-Computer Interaction, 18 (1) pp. 51-84.

It is increasingly recognized that social interaction and collaboration rely on the participants' abilities to access and use a range of resources including objects and artifacts from within the immediate environment. In recent years, system support for remote collaboration has begun to address this issue, and we have witnessed the emergence of a number of technologies designed to provide remote participants with access to (features of) each others' environment. In this article we examine the use of one such system, an innovative mixed media environment designed to enable participants to refer to and point at objects and artifacts within each other's remote environment. The article addresses the ways in which participants use the system to undertake various collaborative activities and discusses the problems and issues that emerge, for the participants' themselves, in coordinating action with and through objects. We then consider these issues with regard to interaction and collaboration in more conventional environments such as work settings, and we discuss the ways in which the interpretation and production of action are inextricably embedded within the immediate environment, an environment of action that is inadvertently fractured in even this more sophisticated media space.

© All rights reserved Luff et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Fraser, Mike, Stanton, Danae, Ng, K. H., Benford, Steve, Malley, C. O., Bowers, John, Taxen, G., Ferris, K. and Hindmarsh, Jon (2003): Assembling history: Achieving coherent experiences with diverse technologies. In: Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2003. pp. 179-198.

2002
 
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Heath, Christian, Svensson, Martin, Hindmarsh, Jon, Luff, Paul and Lehn, Dirk vom (2002): Configuring Awareness. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 11 (3) pp. 317-347.

The concept of awareness has become of increasing importance to both social and technical research in CSCW. The concept remains however relatively unexplored, and we still have little understanding of the ways in which people produce and sustain 'awareness' in and through social interaction with others. In this paper, we focus on a particular aspect of awareness, the ways in which participants design activities to have others unobtrusively notice and discover, actions and events, which might otherwise pass unnoticed. We consider for example how participants render visible selective aspects of their activities, how they encourage others to notice features of the local milieu, and how they encourage others to become sensitive to particular events. We draw examples from different workplaces, primarily centres of coordination; organisational environments which rest upon the participants' abilities to delicately interweave a complex array of highly contingent, yet interdependent activities.

© All rights reserved Heath et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Hindmarsh, Jon, Heath, Christian, Lehn, Dirk vom and Cleverly, Jason (2002): Creating assemblies: aboard the Ghost Ship. In: Churchill, Elizabeth F., McCarthy, Joe, Neuwirth, Christine and Rodden, Tom (eds.) Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. pp. 156-165. Available online

This paper examines the use of an interactive artwork that was designed by members of the research team and exhibited at the Sculpture, Objects and Functional Art (SOFA) Exposition in Chicago, USA. The paper uses audio-visual recordings of interaction with and around the work to consider how people encounter and make sense of an assembly of traditional objects and video technologies. The analysis of action and interaction is used to develop a series of 'design sensitivities' to inform the development of technological assemblies to engender informal interaction and sociability in museums and galleries.

© All rights reserved Hindmarsh et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Hindmarsh, Jon, Fraser, Mike, Heath, Christian, Benford, Steve and Greenhalgh, Chris (2000): Object-Focused Interaction in Collaborative Virtual Environments. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 7 (4) pp. 477-509. Available online

This paper explores and evaluates the support for object-focused interaction provided by a desktop Collaborative Virtual Environment. An experimental "design" task was conducted, and video recordings of the participants' activities facilitated an observational analysis of interaction in, and through, the virtual world. Observations include: problems due to "fragmented" views of embodiments in relation to shared objects; participants compensating with spoken accounts of their actions; and difficulties in understanding others' perspectives. Implications and proposals for the design of CVEs drawn from these observations are: the use of semidistorted views to support peripheral awareness; more explicit or exaggerated representations of actions than are provided by pseudohumanoid avatars; and navigation techniques that are sensitive to the actions of others. The paper also presents some examples of the ways in which these proposals might be realized.

© All rights reserved Hindmarsh et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Luff, Paul, Hindmarsh, Jon and Heath, Christian (eds.) (2000): Workplace Studies: Recovering Work Practice and Informing System Design. Cambridge University Press

This important new book brings together key researchers in Europe and the United States to discuss critical issues in the study of the workplace and to outline recent developments in the field. The collection is divided into two parts. Part I contains a number of detailed case studies that not only provide an insight into the issues central to workplace studies but also some of the problems involved in carrying out such research. Part II focuses on the interrelationship between workplace studies and the design of new technologies.

© All rights reserved Luff et al. and/or Cambridge University Press

1999
 
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Fraser, Mike, Benford, Steve, Hindmarsh, Jon and Heath, Christian (1999): Supporting Awareness and Interaction through Collaborative Virtual Interfaces. In: Zanden, Brad Vander and Marks, Joe (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 07 - 10, 1999, Asheville, North Carolina, United States. pp. 27-36. Available online

This paper explores interfaces to virtual environments supporting multiple users. An interface to an environment allowing interaction with virtual artefacts is constructed, drawing on previous proposals for 'desktop' virtual environments. These include the use of Peripheral Lenses to support peripheral awareness in collaboration; and extending the ways in which users' actions are represented for each other. Through a qualitative analysis of a design task, the effect of the proposals is outlined. Observations indicate that, whilst these designs go some way to re-constructing physical co-presence in terms of awareness and interaction through the environment, some issues remain. Notably, peripheral distortion in supporting awareness may cause problematic interactions with and through the virtual world; and extended representations of actions may still allow problems in re-assembling the composition of others' actions. We discuss the potential for: designing representations for distorted peripheral perception; and explicitly displaying the course of action in object-focused interaction.

© All rights reserved Fraser et al. and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Hindmarsh, Jon, Fraser, Mike, Heath, Christian, Benford, Steve and Greenhalgh, Chris (1998): Fragmented Interaction: Establishing Mutual Orientation in Virtual Environments. In: Poltrock, Steven and Grudin, Jonathan (eds.) Proceedings of the 1998 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 14 - 18, 1998, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 217-226. Available online

This paper explores and evaluates the support for object-focused collaboration provided by a desktop Collaborative Virtual Environment. The system was used to support an experimental 'design' task. Video recordings of the participants' activities facilitated an observational analysis of interaction in, and through, the virtual world. Observations include: problems due to fragmented views of embodiments in relation to shared objects; participants compensating with spoken accounts of their actions; and difficulties in understanding others' perspectives. Design implications include: more explicit representations of actions than are provided by pseudo-humanoid embodiments; and navigation techniques that are sensitive to the actions of others.

© All rights reserved Hindmarsh et al. and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Heath, Christian, Jirotka, Marina, Luff, Paul and Hindmarsh, Jon (1994): Unpacking collaboration: the interactional organisation of trading in a city dealing room. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 3 (2) pp. 147-165. Available online

It is has been widely recognised that whilst CSCW has led to a number of impressive technological developments, examples of successful applications remain few. In part, this may be due to our relative ignorance of the organisation of real world, cooperative activity. Focusing on share trading in a securities house in the City of London, we explore the interactional organisation of particular tasks and the ways in which dealers interweave individual and collaborative activity. These observations suggest ways in which we might reconsider a number of central concepts in CSCW and begin. to draw design implications from naturalistic studies of work and interaction.

© All rights reserved Heath et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

1993
 
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Heath, Christian, Jirotka, Marina, Luff, Paul and Hindmarsh, Jon (1993): Unpacking Collaboration: The Interactional Organisation of Trading in a City Dealing Room. In: Michelis, Giorgio De, Simone, Carla and Schmidt, Kjeld (eds.) ECSCW 93 - Proceedings of the Third European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work 1993. pp. 155-170.

It is increasingly recognised that whilst CSCW has led to a number of impressive technological developments, examples of successful applications remain few. In part, this may be due to our relative ignorance of the organisation of real world, cooperative activity. Focusing on share trading in a securities house in the City of London, we explore the interactional organisation of particular tasks and the ways in which dealers interweave individual and collaborative activity. These observations suggest ways in which we might reconsider a number of central concepts in CSCW and begin to draw design implications from naturalistic studies of work and interaction.

© All rights reserved Heath et al. and/or Kluwer

 
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