Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2011
Pub. count:4
Number of co-authors:18



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Yvonne Rogers:4
Paul Marshall:2
Stephen Payne:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jon Bird's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Yvonne Rogers:99
Antonio Krger:59
Nicolas Villar:32
 
 
 

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Jon Bird

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Publications by Jon Bird (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Linden, Janet van der, Johnson, Rose, Bird, Jon, Rogers, Yvonne and Schoonderwaldt, Erwin (2011): Buzzing to play: lessons learned from an in the wild study of real-time vibrotactile feedback. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 533-542.

Vibrotactile feedback offers much potential for facilitating and accelerating how people learn sensory-motor skills that typically take hundreds of hours to learn, such as learning to play a musical instrument, skiing or swimming. However, there is little evidence of this benefit materializing outside of research lab settings. We describe the findings of an in-the-wild study that explored how to integrate vibrotactile feedback into a real-world teaching setting. The focus of the study was on exploring how children of different ages, learning to play the violin, can use real-time vibrotactile feedback. Many of the findings were unexpected, showing how students and their teachers appropriated the technology in creative ways. We present some 'lessons learned' that are also applicable to other training settings, emphasizing the need to understand how vibrotactile feedback can switch between being foregrounded and backgrounded depending on the demands of the task, the teacher's role in making it work and when feedback is most relevant and useful. Finally, we discuss how vibrotactile feedback can provide a new language for talking about the skill being learned that may also play an instrumental role in enhancing learning.

© All rights reserved Linden et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Kalnikait, Vaiva, Rogers, Yvonne, Bird, Jon, Villar, Nicolas, Bachour, Khaled, Payne, Stephen, Todd, Peter M., Schning, Johannes, Krger, Antonio and Kreitmayer, Stefan (2011): How to nudge in Situ: designing lambent devices to deliver salient information in supermarkets. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 11-20.

There are a number of mobile shopping aids and recommender systems available, but none can be easily used for a weekly shop at a local supermarket. We present a minimal, mobile and fully functional lambent display that clips onto any shopping trolley handle, intended to nudge people when choosing what to buy. It provides salient information about the food miles for various scanned food items represented by varying lengths of lit LEDs on the handle and a changing emoticon comparing the average miles of all the products in the trolley against a social norm. When evaluated in situ, the lambent handle display nudged people to choose products with fewer food miles than the items they selected using their ordinary shopping strategies. People also felt guilty when the average mileage of the contents of their entire shopping trolley was above the social norm. The findings are discussed in terms of how to provide different kinds of product information that people care about, using simple lambent displays.

© All rights reserved Kalnikait et al. and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Holland, Simon, Marshall, Paul, Bird, Jon, Dalton, Nick Sheep, Morris, Richard, Pantidi, Nadia, Rogers, Yvonne and Clark, Andy (2009): Running up Blueberry Hill: prototyping whole body interaction in harmony space. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 93-98.

 
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Bird, Jon, Marshall, Paul and Rogers, Yvonne (2009): Low-fi skin vision: a case study in rapid prototyping a sensory substitution system. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 55-64.

We describe the design process we have used to develop a minimal, twenty vibration motor Tactile Vision Sensory Substitution (TVSS) system which enables blind-folded subjects to successfully track and bat a rolling ball and thereby experience 'skin vision'. We have employed a low-fi rapid prototyping approach to build this system and argue that this methodology is particularly effective for building embedded interactive systems. We support this argument in two ways. First, by drawing on theoretical insights from robotics, a discipline that also has to deal with the challenge of building complex embedded systems that interact with their environments; second, by using the development of our TVSS as a case study: describing the series of prototypes that led to our successful design and highlighting what we learnt at each stage.

© All rights reserved Bird et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Apr 2012: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/jon_bird.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2011
Pub. count:4
Number of co-authors:18



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Yvonne Rogers:4
Paul Marshall:2
Stephen Payne:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jon Bird's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Yvonne Rogers:99
Antonio Krger:59
Nicolas Villar:32
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
90% booked. Starts in 5 days
go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
89% booked. Starts in 6 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading