Publication statistics

Pub. period:1987-2009
Pub. count:60
Number of co-authors:80



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Dugald Ralph Hutchings:7
Zachary Pousman:6
Christopher Plaue:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

John T. Stasko's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Scott E. Hudson:113
Mary Czerwinski:80
 
 
 
Jul 09

The evolution of HCI technology is a coevolution of HCI tasks and HCI artifacts: A task implicitly sets requirements for the development of artifacts to support; an artifact suggests possibilities and introduces constraints that often radically redefine the task for which the artifact was originally developed. [...] This dynamic relation, the task-artifact cycle, circumscribes the development activities of human-computer interaction

-- John M. Carroll, Wendy A. Kellogg, and Mary Beth Rosson in "The Task-Artifact Cycle" in Designing Interaction (1992)

 
 

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John T. Stasko

Picture of John T. Stasko.
Has also published under the name of:
"John Stasko"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~stasko/

Prof. Stasko is Director of the Information Interfaces Research Group whose mission is to help people take advantage of information to enrich their lives. As the amount of data available to people and organizations has skyrocketed over the past 10-20 years, largely fueled by the growth of the internet, insufficient methods for people to benefit from this flood of data have been developed. A central focus of many of the group's projects is the creation of information visualization and visual analytics tools to help people explore, analyze, and understand large data sets. In particular, they are creating visual analytics systems to help people with "sense-making" activities on data sets such as large document collections. The group also has developed a number of techniques and systems for providing people with peripheral awareness of useful information. Follow the link to the research group in order to visit pages with more details on these projects. John is a faculty investigator in the Dept. of Homeland Security's VACCINE Center of Excellence (GT page) focusing on developing visual analytics technologies and solutions for grand challenge problems in homeland security, and in the NSF FODAVA Center exploring the foundations of data analysis and visual analytics. He is also an affiliated faculty member in the Tennenbaum Institute at Georgia Tech.

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Publications by John T. Stasko (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Plaue, Christopher and Stasko, John T. (2009): Presence & placement: exploring the benefits of multiple shared displays on an intellective sensemaking task. In: GROUP09 - International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2009. pp. 179-188.

Relatively little is known about how the presence and location of multiple shared displays changes the performance and dynamics of teams collaborating. We conducted a case study evaluating several shared display configurations with groups collaborating on a data-intensive, sense-making task. Teams completed the same task using either a single display, side-by-side dual, or opposing dual shared displays. The location of the second shared display significantly impacted the ability for teams to make logical connections amongst the data. Users were also significantly more satisfied with the collaboration process using the side-by-side dual display condition than those using a single display.

© All rights reserved Plaue and Stasko and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Eagan, James R. and Stasko, John T. (2008): The buzz: supporting user tailorability in awareness applications. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1729-1738.

Information awareness applications offer the exciting potential to help people to better manage the data they encounter on a routine basis, but customizing these applications is a difficult task. Most applications allow users to perform basic customizations or programmers to create advanced ones. We present an intermediate customization space and Cocoa Buzz, an application that demonstrates one way to bridge these two extremes. Cocoa Buzz runs on an extra display on the user's desktop or on a large shared display and cycles through different information sources customized by the user. We further demonstrate some of the customizations that have been made using this approach. We show some preliminary evidence to suggest that this approach may be useful at providing users with the ability to perform customizations across this spectrum.

© All rights reserved Eagan and Stasko and/or ACM Press

 
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Kang, Youn-ah and Stasko, John T. (2008): Lightweight Task/Application Performance using Single versus Multiple Monitors: A Comparative Study. In: Proceedings of the 2008 Conference on Graphics Interface May 28-30, 2008, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. pp. 17-24.

It is becoming increasingly common to see computers with two or even three monitors being used today. People seem to like having more display space available, and intuition tells us that the added space should be beneficial to work. Little research has been done to examine the effects and potential utility of multiple monitors for work on everyday tasks with common applications, however. We compared how people completed a trip planning task that involved different applications and included interjected interruptions when they worked on a computer with one monitor as compared to a computer with two monitors. Results showed that participants who used the computer with two monitors performed the task set faster and with less workload, and they also expressed a subjective preference for the multiple monitor computer.

© All rights reserved Kang and Stasko and/or their publisher

 
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Pousman, Zachary, Rouzati, Hafez and Stasko, John T. (2008): Imprint, a community visualization of printer data: designing for open-ended engagement on sustainability. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 13-16.

We introduce Imprint, a casual information visualization kiosk that displays data extracted from a printer queue. We designed the system to be open-ended, and to support a workgroup in reflection and conversation about the data. Imprint's visualizations depict environmental issues, such as energy consumption and paper consumption of the printers, as well as social information, such as popular concepts from the printed matter. Imprint is intended to spark reflection and conversation, and to bring data into discussions about paper usage and "waste." Our goal is not to explicitly reduce paper, energy, or toner consumption, but instead to open conversations by community members. Our work highlights a design approach for semi-public displays of personal data.

© All rights reserved Pousman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Stasko, John T. (2008): Visualization for information exploration and analysis. In: VL-HCC 2008 - IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing 15-19 September, 2008, Herrsching am Ammersee, Germany. pp. 7-8.

 
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Stasko, John T. (2008): Visualization for information exploration and analysis. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Software Visualization 2008. pp. 7-8.

Making sense of data becomes more challenging as the data grows larger and becomes more complex. If a picture truly can be worth a thousand words, then clever visualizations of data should hold promise in helping people with sense-making tasks. I firmly believe that visual representations of data can help people to better explore, analyze, and understand it, thus transforming the data into information. In this talk, I will explain how visualization and visual analytics help people make sense of data and I will provide many such examples. I also will describe my present research into visualization for investigative analysis. This project explores how visual analytics can help investigators examine a large document collection in order to discover embedded stories and narratives scattered across the documents in the collection.

© All rights reserved Stasko and/or ACM Press

 
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Plaisant, Catherine, Grinstein, Georges G., Scholtz, Jean, Whiting, Mark A., O'Connell, Theresa A., Laskowski, Sharon J., Chien, Lynn, Tat, Annie, Wright, William, Görg, Carsten, Liu, Zhicheng, Parekh, Neel, Singhal, Kanupriya and Stasko, John T. (2008): Evaluating Visual Analytics at the 2007 VAST Symposium Contest. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 28 (2) pp. 12-21.

2007
 
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Hutchings, Dugald Ralph and Stasko, John T. (2007): Consistency, multiple monitors, and multiple windows. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 211-214.

We present an evaluation of mudibo, a prototype system for determining the position of dialog boxes in a multiple-monitor system. The analysis shows that, when compared to a standard approach, mudibo offered a 24% decrease in time needed to begin interaction in a dialog box. Analysis of participant behavior in the evaluation provides insight into the way users perceive and act in multiple-monitor environments. Specifically, the notion of consistency changes for multiple-monitor systems and the prospect of adaptive algorithms becomes further complicated and intricate, especially for window management.

© All rights reserved Hutchings and Stasko and/or ACM Press

 
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Xiao, Jun, Stasko, John T. and Catrambone, Richard (2007): The role of choice and customization on users' interaction with embodied conversational agents: effects on perception and performance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1293-1302.

We performed an empirical study exploring people's interactions with an embodied conversational agent (ECA) while performing two tasks. Conditions varied with respect to 1) whether participants were allowed to choose an agent and its characteristics and 2) the putative quality or appropriateness of the agent for the tasks. For both tasks, selection combined with the illusion of further customization significantly improved participants' overall subjective impressions of the ECAs while putative quality had little or no effect. Additionally, performance data revealed that the ECA's motivation and persuasion effects were significantly enhanced when participants chose agents to use. We found that user expectations about and perceptions of the interaction between themselves and an ECA depended very much on the individual's preconceived notions and preferences of various ECA characteristics and might deviate greatly from the models that ECA designers intend to portray.

© All rights reserved Xiao et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Plaue, Christopher and Stasko, John T. (2007): Animation in a peripheral display: distraction, appeal, and information conveyance in varying display configurations. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Graphics Interface 2007. pp. 135-142.

Peripheral displays provide secondary awareness of news and information to people. When such displays are static, the amount of information that can be presented is limited and the display may become boring or routine over time. Adding animation to peripheral displays can allow them to show more information and can potentially enhance visual interest and appeal, but it may also make the display very distracting. Is it possible to employ animation for visual benefit without increasing distraction? We have created a peripheral display system called BlueGoo that visualizes R.S.S. news feeds as animated photographic collages. We present an empirical study in which participants did not find the system to be distracting, and many found it to be appealing. The study also explored how different display sizes and positions affect information conveyance and distraction. Animations on an angled second monitor appeared to be more distracting than three other configurations.

© All rights reserved Plaue and Stasko and/or Canadian Information Processing Society

 
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Hutchings, Dugald Ralph and Stasko, John T. (2007): Quantifying the Performance Effect of Window Snipping in Multiple-Monitor Environments. In: Baranauskas, Maria Cecília Calani, Palanque, Philippe A., Abascal, Julio and Barbosa, Simone Diniz Junqueira (eds.) DEGAS 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services September 11th, 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. pp. 461-474.

 
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Stasko, John T., Doo, Myungcheol, Dorn, Brian and Plaue, Christopher (2007): Explorations and Experiences with Ambient Information Systems. In: Hazlewood, William R., Coyle, Lorcan and Consolvo, Sunny (eds.) Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Ambient Information Systems - Colocated at Pervasive 2007 May 13, 2007, Toronto, Canada. .

 
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Pousman, Zachary and Stasko, John T. (2007): Ambient Information Systems: Evaluation in Two Paradigms. In: Hazlewood, William R., Coyle, Lorcan and Consolvo, Sunny (eds.) Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Ambient Information Systems - Colocated at Pervasive 2007 May 13, 2007, Toronto, Canada. .

 
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Cook, Kris, Earnshaw, Rae A. and Stasko, John T. (2007): Guest Editors' Introduction: Discovering the Unexpected. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 27 (5) pp. 15-19.

2006
 
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Pousman, Zachary and Stasko, John T. (2006): A taxonomy of ambient information systems: four patterns of design. In: Celentano, Augusto (ed.) AVI 2006 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced visual interfaces May 23-26, 2006, Venezia, Italy. pp. 67-74.

 
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Conti, Gregory J., Abdullah, Kulsoom, Grizzard, Julian B., Stasko, John T., Copeland, John A., Ahamad, Mustaque, Owen, Henry L. and Lee, Christopher P. (2006): Countering Security Information Overload through Alert and Packet Visualization. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 26 (2) pp. 60-70.

2005
 
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Hutchings, Dugald Ralph, Stasko, John T. and Czerwinski, Mary (2005): Distributed display environments. In Interactions, 12 (6) pp. 50-53.

 
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Hutchings, Dugald Ralph and Stasko, John T. (2005): mudibo: multiple dialog boxes for multiple monitors. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1471-1474.

A general problem identified in recent research on multiple monitor systems is the placement of small windows such as dialog boxes and toolbars. These small windows could be placed on top of the application window or on a monitor next to the application window; different situations call for different placements. We present mudibo, a component of the window manager that alleviates this problem by initially placing a window in multiple locations simultaneously and subsequently allowing the user to easily interact with the window in a desired location. Additional important contributions of mudibo are that as a general technique it can be applied to a number of situations and windows beyond simple dialog boxes, exploits the additional screen space that multiple monitors provide to solve a specific problem with dialog box interaction, and is among the first research prototype UIs that explicitly account for multiple-monitor users.

© All rights reserved Hutchings and Stasko and/or ACM Press

 
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Hutchings, Dugald Ralph, Stasko, John T. and Czerwinski, Mary (2005): Distributed display environments. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 2117-2118.

 
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Conti, Gregory, Ahamad, Mustaque and Stasko, John T. (2005): Attacking information visualization system usability overloading and deceiving the human. In: Proceedings of the 2005 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2005. pp. 89-100.

Information visualization is an effective way to easily comprehend large amounts of data. For such systems to be truly effective, the information visualization designer must be aware of the ways in which their system may be manipulated and protect their users from attack. In addition, users should be aware of potential attacks in order to minimize or negate their effect. These attacks target the information visualization system as well as the perceptual, cognitive and motor capabilities of human end users. To identify and help counter these attacks we present a framework for information visualization system security analysis, a taxonomy of visualization attacks and technology independent principles for countering malicious visualizations. These themes are illustrated with case studies and working examples from the network security visualization domain, but are widely applicable to virtually any information visualization system.

© All rights reserved Conti et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Abdullah, Kulsoom, Lee, Christopher P., Conti, Gregory J., Copeland, John A. and Stasko, John T. (2005): IDS RainStorm: Visualizing IDS Alarms. In: Ma, Kwan-Liu, North, Stephen C. and Yurcik, William (eds.) VizSEC 2005 - IEEE Workshop on Visualization for Computer Security 26 October, 2005, Minneapolis, MN, USA. p. 1.

 
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Amar, Robert A., Eagan, James and Stasko, John T. (2005): Low-Level Components of Analytic Activity in Information Visualization. In: InfoVis 2005 - IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 23-25 October, 2005, Minneapolis, MN, USA. p. 15.

2004
 
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Plaue, Christopher, Miller, Todd and Stasko, John T. (2004): Is a picture worth a thousand words?: an evaluation of information awareness displays. In: Graphics Interface 2004 May 17-19, 2004, London, Ontario, Canada. pp. 117-126.

What makes a peripheral or ambient display more effective at presenting awareness information than another? Presently, little is known in this regard and techniques for evaluating these types of displays are just beginning to be developed. In this article, we focus on one aspect of a peripheral display's effectiveness -- its ability to communicate information at a glance. We conducted an evaluation of the InfoCanvas, a peripheral display that conveys awareness information graphically as a form of information art, by assessing how well people recall information when it is presented for a brief period of time. We compare performance of the InfoCanvas to two other electronic information displays, a Web portal style and a text-based display, when each display was viewed for a short period of time. We found that participants noted and recalled significantly more information when presented by the InfoCanvas than by either of the other displays despite having to learn the additional graphical representations employed by the InfoCanvas.

© All rights reserved Plaue et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hutchings, Dugald Ralph and Stasko, John T. (2004): Revisiting display space management: understanding current practice to inform next-generation design. In: Graphics Interface 2004 May 17-19, 2004, London, Ontario, Canada. pp. 127-134.

Most modern computer systems allow the user to control the space allocated to interfaces through a window system. While much of the understanding of how people interact with windows may be regarded as well-known, there are very few reports of documented window management practices. Recent work on larger display spaces indicates that multiple monitor use is becoming more commonplace, and that users are experiencing a variety of usability issues with their window systems. The lack of understanding of how people generally interact with windows implies that future design and evaluation of window managers may not address emerging user needs and display systems. Thus we present a study of people using a variety of window managers and display configurations to illustrate manager- and display-independent space management issues. We illustrate several issues with space management, and each issue includes discussion of the implications of both evaluations and design directions for future window managers. We also present a classification of users' space management styles and relationships to window system types.

© All rights reserved Hutchings and Stasko and/or their publisher

 
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Stasko, John T., Miller, Todd, Pousman, Zachary, Plaue, Christopher and Ullah, Osman (2004): Personalized Peripheral Information Awareness Through Information Art. In: Davies, Nigel, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Siio, Itiro (eds.) UbiComp 2004 Ubiquitous Computing 6th International Conference September 7-10, 2004, Nottingham, UK. pp. 18-25.

 
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Pousman, Zachary, Iachello, Giovanni, Fithian, Rachel, Moghazy, Jehan and Stasko, John T. (2004): Design iterations for a location-aware event planner. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (2) pp. 117-125.

 
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Hutchings, Dugald Ralph and Stasko, John T. (2004): Shrinking window operations for expanding display space. In: Costabile, Maria Francesca (ed.) AVI 2004 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced visual interfaces May 25-28, 2004, Gallipoli, Italy. pp. 350-353.

 
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Amar, Robert A. and Stasko, John T. (2004): BEST PAPER: A Knowledge Task-Based Framework for Design and Evaluation of Information Visualizations. In: InfoVis 2004 - 10th IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 10-12 October, 2004, Austin, TX, USA. pp. 143-150.

 
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Tyman, Jaroslav, Gruetzmacher, Grant P. and Stasko, John T. (2004): InfoVisExplorer. In: InfoVis 2004 - 10th IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 10-12 October, 2004, Austin, TX, USA. .

2003
 
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Newcomb, Erica, Pashley, Toni and Stasko, John T. (2003): Mobile computing in the retail arena. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 337-344.

 
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McCrickard, D. Scott, Catrambone, Richard, Chewar, C. M. and Stasko, John T. (2003): Establishing tradeoffs that leverage attention for utility: empirically evaluating information display in notification systems. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 58 (5) pp. 547-582.

Designing and evaluating notification systems represents an emerging challenge in the study of human-computer interaction. Users rely on notification systems to present potentially interruptive information in an efficient and effective manner to enable appropriate reaction and comprehension. Little is known about the effects of these systems on ongoing computer tasks. As the research community strives to understand information design suitable for opposing usage goals, few existing efforts lend themselves to extensibility. However, three often conflicting design objectives are interruption to primary tasks, reaction to specific notifications, and comprehension of information over time. Based on these competing parameters, we propose a unifying research theme for the field that defines success in notification systems design as achieving the desirable balance between attention and utility. This paradigm distinguishes notification systems research from traditional HCI by centering on the limitations of the human attention system. In a series of experiments that demonstrate this research approach and investigate use of animated text in secondary displays, we describe two empirical investigations focused on the three critical parameters during a browsing task. The first experiment compares tickering, blasting, and fading text, finding that tickering text is best for supporting deeper comprehension, fading best facilitates reaction, and, compared to the control condition, none of the animated displays are interruptive to the browsing task. The second experiment investigates fading and tickering animation in greater detail with similar tasks -- at two different speeds and sizes. Here, we found smaller displays allowed better reaction but were more interruptive, while slower displays provides increased comprehension. Overall, the slow fade appears to be the best secondary display animation type tested. Focusing research and user studies within this field on critical parameters such as interruption, reaction, and comprehension will increase cohesion among design and evaluation efforts for notification systems.

© All rights reserved McCrickard et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Xiao, Jun, Catrambone, Richard and Stasko, John T. (2003): Be Quiet? Evaluating Proactive and Reactive User Interface Assistants. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 383.

 
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Fithian, Rachel, Iachello, Giovanni, Moghazy, Jehan, Pousman, Zachary and Stasko, John T. (2003): The Design and Evaluation of a Mobile Location-Aware Handheld Event Planner. In: Chittaro, Luca (ed.) Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - 5th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2003 September 8-11, 2003, Udine, Italy. pp. 145-160.

 
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Grinstein, Georges G., Kobsa, Alfred, Plaisant, Catherine, Shneiderman, Ben and Stasko, John T. (2003): Which Comes First, Utility or Usability?. In: Turk, Greg, Wijk, Jarke J. van and II, Robert J. Moorhead (eds.) 14th IEEE Visualization 2003 Conference VIS 2003 19-24 October, 2003, Seattle, WA, USA. pp. 605-606.

 
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Csallner, Christoph, Handte, Marcus, Lehmann, Othmar and Stasko, John T. (2003): FundExplorer: Supporting the Diversification of Mutual Fund Portfolios Using Context Treemaps. In: InfoVis 2003 - 9th IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 20-21 October, 2003, Seattle, WA, USA. .

2002
 
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Hundhausen, Christopher D., Douglas, Sarah A. and Stasko, John T. (2002): A Meta-Study of Algorithm Visualization Effectiveness. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 13 (3) pp. 259-290.

2001
 
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Kehoe, Colleen, Stasko, John T. and Taylor, Ashley (2001): Rethinking the Evaluation of Algorithm Animations as Learning Aids: An Observational Study. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 54 (2) pp. 265-284.

One important aspect of creating computer programs is having a sound understanding of the underlying algorithms used by programs. Learning about algorithms, just like learning to program, is difficult, however. A number of prior studies have found that using animation to help teach algorithms had less beneficial effects on learning than hoped. Those results surprise many computer science instructors whose intuition leads them to believe that algorithm animations should assist instruction. This article reports on a study in which animation is utilized in more of a "homework" learning scenario rather than a "final exam" scenario. Our focus is on understanding how learners will utilize animation and other instructional materials in trying to understand a new algorithm, and on gaining insight into how animations can fit into successful learning strategies. The study indicates that students use sophisticated combinations of instructional materials in learning scenarios. In particular, the presence of algorithm animations seems to make a complicated algorithm more accessible and less intimidating, thus leading to enhanced student interaction with the materials and facilitating learning.

© All rights reserved Kehoe et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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McCrickard, D. Scott, Catrambone, Richard and Stasko, John T. (2001): Evaluating Animation in the Periphery as a Mechanism for Maintaining Awareness. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT01: Human-Computer Interaction 2001, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 148-156.

 
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Eagan, James, Harrold, Mary Jean, Jones, James A. and Stasko, John T. (2001): Technical Note: Visually Encoding Program Test Information to Find Faults in Software. In: InfoVis 2001 2001. pp. 33-36.

2000
 
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Stasko, John T., Catrambone, Richard, Guzdial, Mark and Mcdonald, Kevin (2000): An Evaluation of Space-Filling Information Visualizations for Depicting Hierarchical Structures. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 53 (5) pp. 663-694.

A variety of information visualization tools have been developed recently, but relatively little effort has been made to evaluate the effectiveness and utility of the tools. This article describes results from two empirical studies of two visualization tools for depicting hierarchies, in particular, computer file and directory structures. The two tools examined implement space-filling methodologies, one rectangular, the Treemap method, and one circular, the Sunburst method. Participants performed typical file/directory search and analysis tasks using the two tools. In general, performance trends favored the Sunburst tool with respect to correct task performance, particularly on initial use. Performance with Treemap tended to improve over time and use, suggesting a greater learning cost that was partially recouped over time. Each tool afforded somewhat different search strategies, which also appeared to influence performance. Finally, participants strongly preferred the Sunburst tool, citing better ability to convey structure and hierarchy.

© All rights reserved Stasko et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Stasko, John T. and Zhang, Eugene (2000): Focus+Context Display and Navigation Techniques for Enhancing Radial, Space-Filling Hierarchy Visualizations. In: InfoVis 2000 2000. pp. 57-.

1998
 
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Zhao, Qiang Alex and Stasko, John T. (1998): Evaluating Image Filtering Based Techniques in Media Space Applications. In: Poltrock, Steven and Grudin, Jonathan (eds.) Proceedings of the 1998 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 14 - 18, 1998, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 11-18.

Media space applications that promote informal awareness in an organization confront an inevitable paradox: the shared video connections between offices and rooms that promote informal awareness also can rob individuals of privacy. An important open problem in this area is how to foster awareness of colleagues while minimizing the accompanying loss of privacy. One proposal put forward is to filter the communicated video streams rather than broadcasting clear video. Such a scheme may facilitate awareness while helping to alleviate some aspects of the privacy loss. In this article, we describe several image filtering techniques that provide awareness in informal group communication applications while blurring the details of an individual's activities, thus potentially preserving more privacy. We describe studies to quantitatively and qualitatively assess the degrees of awareness and accuracy that these filtering techniques provide.

© All rights reserved Zhao and Stasko and/or ACM Press

 
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Stasko, John T., Domingue, John B., Brown, Marc H. and Price, Blaine A. (eds.) (1998): Software Visualization. The MIT Press

Foreword by Jim Foley In the past decade, high quality interfaces have become standard in a growing number of areas such as games and CD-ROM-based encyclopedias. Yet the overwhelming majority of programmers edit their code using a single font within a single window and view code execution via the hand insertion of print statements.Software Visualization (SV) redresses this imbalance by using typography, graphics, and animation techniques to show program code, data, and control flow. This book describes the history of SV, techniques and frameworks for its construction, its use in education and program debugging, and recent attempts to evaluate its effectiveness. In making programming a multimedia experience, SV leaves programmers and computer science researchers free to explore more interesting issues and to tackle more challenging problems.Contributors : Ronald Baecker, John Bazik, Alan Blackwell, Mike Brayshaw, Marc H. Brown, Wim De Pauw, John B. Domingue, Stephen Eick, Marc Eisenstadt, Christopher Fry, Peter Gloor, Thomas Green, Michael Heath, John Hershberger, Clinton L. Jeffery, Doug Kimelman, Eileen Kraemer, Andrea Lawrence, Henry Lieberman, Allen Malony, Aaron Marcus, Paul Mulholland, Marc Najork, Stephen North, Marian Petre, Blaine A. Price, Steven Reiss, Gruia-Catalin Roman, Diane Rover, Bryan Rosenburg, Tova Roth, Robert Sedgewick, Ian Small, John T. Stasko, Roberto Tamassia, Andries van Dam, John Vlissides.

© All rights reserved Stasko et al. and/or The MIT Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Aesthetic Computing: [/encyclopedia/aesthetic_computing.html]


 
1996
 
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Stasko, John T. and Muthukumarasamy, Jeyakumar (1996): Visualizing Program Executions on Large Data Sets. In: VL 1996 1996. pp. 166-173.

1995
 
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Jerding, Dean F. and Stasko, John T. (1995): Using Information Murals in Visualization Applications. In: Robertson, George G. (ed.) Proceedings of the 8th annual ACM symposium on User interface and software technology November 15 - 17, 1995, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. pp. 73-74.

Information visualizations must allow users to browse information spaces and focus quickly on items of interest. Navigational techniques which utilize some representation of the entire information space provide context to support more detailed information views. However, the limited number of pixels on the screen makes it difficult to completely display large information spaces. The Information Mural is a two-dimensional, reduced representation of an entire information space that fits entirely within a display window or screen. The mural creates a miniature version of the information space using visual attributes such as grayscale shading, intensity, color, and pixel size, along with anti-aliased compression techniques. Information murals can be used as stand-alone visualizations or in global navigational views.

© All rights reserved Jerding and Stasko and/or ACM Press

 
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Jerding, Dean F. and Stasko, John T. (1995): The information mural: a technique for displaying and navigating large information spaces. In: Gershon, Nahum D. and Eick, Stephen G. (eds.) InfoVis 1995 - IEEE Symposium On Information Visualization 30-31 October, 1995, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 43-50.

1994
 
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Garcia, Mariano, Badre, Albert N. and Stasko, John T. (1994): Development and Validation of Icons Varying in their Abstractness. In Interacting with Computers, 6 (2) pp. 191-211.

Icons are used widely in human-computer interfaces. The level of abstractness-concreteness of an icon and its effect upon performance is of widespread interest. The authors have devised a quantitative measure for abstractness based on the complexity of the icon. They test their metric against subjective judgments of abstractness as identified by two different groups of subjects. After ranking two sets of 'abstract' and 'concrete' icons, the authors examined how well the icons were matched to the Pascal constructs that they represented. Further experiments were conducted using different groups of subjects to check whether correct matching of the icons with constructs was influenced by context. In summary the authors found that their metric was a good match for subjective measures of abstractness-concreteness. They also found that there is a better identification of concrete icons than abstract icons. Finally, it was shown that context does affect the correct identification of icons.

© All rights reserved Garcia et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Mukherjea, Sougata and Stasko, John T. (1994): Toward Visual Debugging: Integrating Algorithm Animation Capabilities within a Source-Level Debugger. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 1 (3) pp. 215-244.

Much of the recent research in software visualization has been polarized toward two opposite domains. In one domain that we call data structure and program visualization, low-level canonical views of program structures are generated automatically. These types of views, which do not require programmer input or intervention, can be useful for testing and debugging software. Often, however, their generic, low-level views are not expressive enough to convey adequately how a program functions. In the second domain called algorithm animation, designers handicraft abstract, application-specific views that are useful for program understanding and teaching. Unfortunately, since algorithm animation development typically requires time-consuming design with a graphics package, it will not be used for debugging, where timeliness is a necessity. However, we speculate that the application-specific nature of algorithm animation views could be a valuable debugging aid for software developers as well, if only the views could be easy and rapid to create. We have developed a system called Lens that occupies a unique niche between the two domains discussed above and explores the capabilities that such a system may offer. Lens allows programmers to build rapidly (in minutes) algorithm animation-style program views without requiring any sophisticated graphics knowledge and without using textual coding. Lens also is integrated with a system debugger to promote iterative design and exploration.

© All rights reserved Mukherjea and Stasko and/or ACM Press

 
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Brown, Marc, Domingue, John, Price, Blaine and Stasko, John T. (1994): Software Visualization. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (4) pp. 32-35.

 
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Lawrence, Andrea W., Badre, Albert N. and Stasko, John T. (1994): Empirically Evaluating the Use of Animations to Teach Algorithms. In: VL 1994 1994. pp. 48-54.

1993
 
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Stasko, John T., Badre, Albert N. and Lewis, Clayton H. (1993): Do Algorithm Animations Assist Learning? An Empirical Study and Analysis. In: Ashlund, Stacey, Mullet, Kevin, Henderson, Austin, Hollnagel, Erik and White, Ted (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 93 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 24-29, 1993, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 61-66.

Algorithm animations are dynamic graphical illustrations of computer algorithms, and they are used as teaching aids to help explain how the algorithms work. Although many people believe that algorithm animations are useful this way, no empirical evidence has ever been presented supporting this belief. We have conducted an empirical study of a priority queue algorithm animation, and the study's results indicate that the animation only slightly assisted student understanding. In this article, we analyze those results and hypothesize why algorithm animations may not be as helpful as was initially hoped. We also develop guidelines for making algorithm animations.

© All rights reserved Stasko et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hudson, Scott E. and Stasko, John T. (1993): Animation Support in a User Interface Toolkit: Flexible, Robust and Reusable Abstractions. In: Hudson, Scott E., Pausch, Randy, Zanden, Brad Vander and Foley, James D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology 1993, Atlanta, Georgia, United States. pp. 57-67.

Animation can be a very effective mechanism to convey information in visualization and user interface settings. However, integrating animated presentations into user interfaces has typically been a difficult task since, to date, there has been little or no explicit support for animation in window systems or user interface toolkits. This paper describes how the Artkit user interface toolkit has been extended with new animation support abstractions designed to overcome this problem. These abstractions provide a powerful but convenient base for building a range of animations, supporting techniques such as simple motion-blur, "squash and stretch", use of arcing trajectories, anticipation and follow through, and "slow-in / slow-out" transitions. Because these abstractions are provided by the toolkit they are reusable and may be freely mixed with more conventional user interface techniques. In addition, the Artkit implementation of these abstractions is robust in the face of systems (such as the X Window System and Unix) which can be ill-behaved with respect to timing considerations.

© All rights reserved Hudson and Stasko and/or ACM Press

 
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Stasko, John T. and Wehrli, Joseph F. (1993): Three-Dimensional Computation Visualization. In: Proceedings of the 1993 IEEE Workshop on Visual Languages August 24-27, 1993, Bergen, Norway. pp. 100-107.

1992
 
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Stasko, John T. and Patterson, Charles (1992): Understanding and Characterizing Software Visualization Systems. In: Proceedings of the 1992 IEEE Workshop on Visual Languages September 15-18, 1992, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 3-10.

 
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Stasko, John T. and Turner, Carlton Reid (1992): Tidy Animations of Tree Algorithms. In: Proceedings of the 1992 IEEE Workshop on Visual Languages September 15-18, 1992, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 216-218.

1991
 
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Stasko, John T. (1991): Using Direct Manipulation to Build Algorithm Animations by Demonstration. In: Robertson, Scott P., Olson, Gary M. and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 91 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 28 - June 5, 1991, New Orleans, Louisiana. pp. 307-314.

Dance is a tool that facilitates direct manipulation, demonstrational development of animations for the Tango algorithm animation system. Designers sketch out target actions in a graphical-editing fashion, then Dance automatically generates the code that will carry out those actions. Dance promotes ease-of-design, rapid prototyping, and increased experimentation. It also introduces a methodology that could be used to incorporate demonstrational animation design into areas such as computer assisted instruction and user interface development.

© All rights reserved Stasko and/or ACM Press

1990
 
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Stasko, John T. (1990): TANGO: A Framework and System for Algorithm Animation. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 21 (3) pp. 59-60.

 
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Stasko, John T. (1990): Tango: A Framework and System for Algorithm Animation. In IEEE Computer, 23 (9) pp. 27-39.

 
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Stasko, John T. (1990): Simplifying Algorithm Animation with TANGO. In: VL 1990 1990. pp. 1-6.

1987
 
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Stasko, John T. and Vitter, Jeffrey Scott (1987): Pairing Heaps: Experiments and Analysis. In Communications of the ACM, 30 (3) pp. 234-249.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/john_t__stasko.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1987-2009
Pub. count:60
Number of co-authors:80



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Dugald Ralph Hutchings:7
Zachary Pousman:6
Christopher Plaue:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

John T. Stasko's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Scott E. Hudson:113
Mary Czerwinski:80
 
 
 
Jul 09

The evolution of HCI technology is a coevolution of HCI tasks and HCI artifacts: A task implicitly sets requirements for the development of artifacts to support; an artifact suggests possibilities and introduces constraints that often radically redefine the task for which the artifact was originally developed. [...] This dynamic relation, the task-artifact cycle, circumscribes the development activities of human-computer interaction

-- John M. Carroll, Wendy A. Kellogg, and Mary Beth Rosson in "The Task-Artifact Cycle" in Designing Interaction (1992)

 
 

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