Publication statistics

Pub. period:-2003
Pub. count:8
Number of co-authors:12



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Val King:4
Tom Rodden:4
Hans Andersen:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

John Hughes's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Tom Rodden:106
Mark Rouncefield:55
Jon O'Brien:17
 
 
 
Jul 28

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John Hughes

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Publications by John Hughes (bibliography)

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2003
 
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Hughes, John and Parkes, Steve (2003): Trends in the use of verbal protocol analysis in software engineering research. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 22 (2) pp. 127-140.

This article reviews the technique of verbal protocol analysis and gives a profile of its use within software engineering research over the last two decades. An overview is given of the procedures used in verbal protocol analysis, and commonly-found difficulties in the application of the technique by researchers are described. The article reports on published efforts to develop tools to automate the procedures. A review of the literature shows trends in the use of the verbal protocol analysis in software engineering research from the 1980s to the present. Recurring themes of its purpose within software engineering research are identified, including the comparison of the behaviours of subjects with differing levels of expertise and the identification of effective software comprehension strategies. Advances and problems with the development of a general-purpose encoding scheme for verbal protocol analysis appropriate to a range of domains within software engineering are described.

© All rights reserved Hughes and Parkes and/or Taylor and Francis

2000
 
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Hughes, John, O'Brien, Jon, Rodden, Tom and Rouncefield, Mark (2000): Ethnography, Communication and Support for Design. In: Luff, Paul, Hindmarsh, Jon and Heath, Christian (eds.). "Workplace Studies: Recovering Work Practice and Informing System Design". Cambridge University Presspp. 187-214

ince the late 1980s, and much to the surprise of many of its practitioners, ethnography has risen to a position of some prominence within CSCW research (Bentley et al., 1992; Hughes et al., 1994). This rise has not, of course, gone unchallenged; even from relatively sympathetic critics serious questions have been raised, and quite rightly, about the value of the approach in actually informing system design (see e.g. Plowman et al., 1995). Although this criticism is well taken, it does point to a problem recognised from the outset, namely, how are the results of ethnographic field studies to be conveyed to designers? In fact, there are a host of problems involving, for example, the scope of the design, the size of the design team, the stage of the design and more (see Hughes et al., 1994). Such communication problems have been at the heart of system design for some years even before ethnography and workplace studies came on the scene, and in this connection the ‘story’ related by Cooper et al. (1995) – though pertaining to designers and users – can be adapted to portray something of the state of affairs between fieldworkers and designers: Systems design used to be done by a bunch of techies, deep deep deep within some head office building somewhere. Here they would build their system. Test it, test it, test it, until they were sure it would work, and then they would throw it over this great high brick wall, and hope that the user would catch it, on the other side.

© All rights reserved Hughes et al. and/or Cambridge University Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Ethnography: [/encyclopedia/ethnography.html]


 
1995
 
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Grimm, Cindy, Pugmire, David, Bloomenthal, Mark, Hughes, John and Cohen, Elaine (1995): Visual Interfaces for Solids Modeling. In: Robertson, George G. (ed.) Proceedings of the 8th annual ACM symposium on User interface and software technology November 15 - 17, 1995, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. pp. 51-60.

This paper explores the use of visual operators for solids modeling. We focus on designing interfaces for free-form operators such as blends, sweeps, and deformations, because these operators have a large number of interacting parameters whose effects are often determined by an underlying parameterization. In this type of interactive modeling good solutions to the design problem have aesthetic as well as engineering components. Traditionally, interaction with the parameters of these operators has been through text editors, curve editors, or trial-and-error with a slider bar. Parametric values have been estimated from data, but not interactively. These parameters are usually one- or two-dimensional, but the operators themselves are intrinsically three-dimensional in that they are used to model surfaces visualized in 3D. The traditional textual style of interaction is tedious and interposes a level of abstraction between the parameters and the resulting surface. A 3D visual interface has the potential to reduce or eliminate these problems by combining parameters and representing them with a higher-level visual tool. The visual tools we present not only speed up the process of determining good parameter values but also provide visual interactions that are either independent of the particular parameterizations or make explicit the effect of the parameterizations. Additionally, these tools can be manipulated in the same 3D space as the surfaces produced by the operators, supporting quick, interactive exploration of the large design space of these free-form operators. This paper discusses the difficulties in creating a coherent user interface for interactive modeling. To this end we present four principles for designing visual operators, using several free-form visual operators as concrete examples.

© All rights reserved Grimm et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hughes, John, King, Val, Rodden, Tom and Andersen, Hans (1995): The Role of Ethnography in Interactive Systems Design. In Interactions, 2 (2) pp. 56-65.

The authors describe their experiences in applying ethnographic methods to understand the social nature of work in developing complex, interactive systems.

© All rights reserved Hughes et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

1994
 
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Hughes, John, King, Val, Rodden, Tom and Andersen, Hans (1994): Moving Out from the Control Room: Ethnography in System Design. In: Proceedings of the 1994 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work October 22 - 26, 1994, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. pp. 429-439.

Ethnography has gained considerable prominence as a technique for informing CSCW systems development of the nature of work. Experiences of ethnography reported to date have focused on the use of prolonged on-going ethnography to inform systems design. A considerable number of these studies have taken place within constrained and focused work domain. This paper reflects more generally on the experiences of using ethnography across a number of different projects and in a variety of domains of study. We identify a number of ways in which we have used ethnography to inform design and consider the benefits and problems of each.

© All rights reserved Hughes et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Semi-structured qualitative studies: [/encyclopedia/semi-structured_qualitative_studies.html]


 
 
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Hughes, John, King, Val, Rodden, Tom and Andersen, Hans (1994): Moving out of the Control Room: Ethnography in System Design. In: Proceedings of the 1994 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work October 22 - 26, 1994, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. pp. 429-439.

Ethnography has gained considerable prominence as a technique for informing CSCW systems development of the nature of work. Experiences of ethnography reported to date have focused on the use of prolonged on-going enthnography to inform systems design. A considerable number of these studies have taken place within constrained and focused work domain. This paper reflects more generally on the experiences of using ethnography across a number of different projects and in a variety of domains of study. We identify a number of ways in which we have used ethnography to inform design and consider the benefits and problems of each.

© All rights reserved Hughes et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Ethnography: [/encyclopedia/ethnography.html]


 
 
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Randall, Dave, Hughes, John and Shapiro, Dan (1994): Steps toward a partnership: ethnography and system design. In: Jirotka, Marina, Goguen, Joseph A., Monk, Andrew F. and Gaines, Brian R. (eds.). "Requirements Engineering". San Diego, USA: Academic Presspp. 241-258

 Cited in the following chapter:

Ethnography: [/encyclopedia/ethnography.html]


 
 
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Hughes, John and King, Val (): Sociology for Large-Scale Systems Design. In: Proceedings of CRICT conference on Software and Systems . .

 Cited in the following chapter:

Ethnography: [/encyclopedia/ethnography.html]


 
 
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Changes to this page (author)

10 Apr 2013: Modified
09 Apr 2013: Modified
09 Apr 2013: Modified
09 Apr 2013: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/john_hughes.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:-2003
Pub. count:8
Number of co-authors:12



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Val King:4
Tom Rodden:4
Hans Andersen:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

John Hughes's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Tom Rodden:106
Mark Rouncefield:55
Jon O'Brien:17
 
 
 
Jul 28

A user will find any interface design intuitive...with enough practice.

-- Popular computer one-liner

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!