Publication statistics

Pub. period:2007-2012
Pub. count:29
Number of co-authors:71



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Antonio Krüger:19
Michael Rohs:11
Brent Hecht:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Johannes Schöning's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Karin Coninx:134
Albrecht Schmidt:110
Yvonne Rogers:99
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
go to course
The Psychology of Online Sales: The Beginner's Guide
Starts the day after tomorrow !
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Johannes Schöning

Personal Homepage:
johannesschoening.de/website/Johannes_Schoning.html


Add description
Rename / change spelling
Add publication
 

Publications by Johannes Schöning (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Hecht, Brent, Carton, Samuel H., Quaderi, Mahmood, Schöning, Johannes, Raubal, Martin, Gergle, Darren and Downey, Doug (2012): Explanatory semantic relatedness and explicit spatialization for exploratory search. In: Proceedings of the 35th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2012. pp. 415-424.

Exploratory search, in which a user investigates complex concepts, is cumbersome with today's search engines. We present a new exploratory search approach that generates interactive visualizations of query concepts using thematic cartography (e.g. choropleth maps, heat maps). We show how the approach can be applied broadly across both geographic and non-geographic contexts through explicit spatialization, a novel method that leverages any figure or diagram -- from a periodic table, to a parliamentary seating chart, to a world map -- as a spatial search environment. We enable this capability by introducing explanatory semantic relatedness measures. These measures extend frequently-used semantic relatedness measures to not only estimate the degree of relatedness between two concepts, but also generate human-readable explanations for their estimates by mining Wikipedia's text, hyperlinks, and category structure. We implement our approach in a system called Atlasify, evaluate its key components, and present several use cases.

© All rights reserved Hecht et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Ramakers, Raf, Vanacken, Davy, Luyten, Kris, Coninx, Karin and Schöning, Johannes (2012): Carpus: a non-intrusive user identification technique for interactive surfaces. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 35-44.

Interactive surfaces have great potential for co-located collaboration because of their ability to track multiple inputs simultaneously. However, the multi-user experience on these devices could be enriched significantly if touch points could be associated with a particular user. Existing approaches to user identification are intrusive, require users to stay in a fixed position, or suffer from poor accuracy. We present a non-intrusive, high-accuracy technique for mapping touches to their corresponding user in a collaborative environment. By mounting a high-resolution camera above the interactive surface, we are able to identify touches reliably without any extra instrumentation, and users are able to move around the surface at will. Our technique, which leverages the back of users' hands as identifiers, supports walk-up-and-use situations in which multiple people interact on a shared surface.

© All rights reserved Ramakers et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
Edit | Del

Döring, Tanja, Kern, Dagmar, Marshall, Paul, Pfeiffer, Max, Schöning, Johannes, Gruhn, Volker and Schmidt, Albrecht (2011): Gestural interaction on the steering wheel: reducing the visual demand. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 483-492.

Cars offer an increasing number of infotainment systems as well as comfort functions that can be controlled by the driver. In our research, we investigate new interaction techniques that aim to make it easier to interact with these systems while driving. We suggest utilizing the steering wheel as an additional interaction surface. In this paper, we present two user studies conducted with a working prototype of a multi-touch steering wheel. In the first, we developed a user-defined steering wheel gesture set, and in the second, we applied the identified gestures and compared their application to conventional user interaction with infotainment systems in terms of driver distraction. The main outcome was that driver's visual demand is reduced significantly by using gestural interaction on the multi-touch steering wheel.

© All rights reserved Döring et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Boring, Sebastian, Gehring, Sven, Wiethoff, Alexander, Blöckner, Anna Magdalena, Schöning, Johannes and Butz, Andreas (2011): Multi-user interaction on media facades through live video on mobile devices. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2721-2724.

The increasing number of media facades in urban spaces offers great potential for new forms of interaction especially for collaborative multi-user scenarios. In this paper, we present a way to directly interact with them through live video on mobile devices. We extend the Touch Projector interface to accommodate multiple users by showing individual content on the mobile display that would otherwise clutter the facade's canvas or distract other users. To demonstrate our concept, we built two collaborative multi-user applications: (1) painting on the facade and (2) solving a 15-puzzle. We gathered informal feedback during the ARS Electronica Festival in Linz, Austria and found that our interaction technique is (1) considered easy-to-learn, but (2) may leave users unaware of the actions of others.

© All rights reserved Boring et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Hecht, Brent, Schöning, Johannes, Erickson, Thomas and Priedhorsky, Reid (2011): Geographic human-computer interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 447-450.

Researchers and practitioners in human-computer interaction are increasingly taking geographic approaches to their work. Whether designing novel location-based systems, developing natural user interfaces for maps, or exploring online interactions over space and time, HCI is discovering that geographic questions, methods, and use cases are becoming integral to our field. Unfortunately, to our knowledge, there have been no direct efforts to unite members of the community exploring geographic HCI. The goal of this forum is to bring together researchers from a variety of areas to provide a summary of what has been done thus far and to discuss options for developing a more formal geographic HCI community. We will also highlight the troublesome lack of communication between scholars in geography and HCI and the opportunities that will result from increased collaboration between the two fields.

© All rights reserved Hecht et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Tse, Edward, Schöning, Johannes, Huber, Jochen, Marentette, Lynn, Beckwith, Richard, Rogers, Yvonne and Mühlhäuser, Max (2011): Child computer interaction: workshop on UI technologies and educational pedagogy. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2445-2448.

Given the growth of Child Computer Interaction research, next generation HCI technologies play an important role in the future of education. Educators rely on technology to improve and adapt learning to the pedagogical needs of learners. Hence, this community needs to understand how current technology concepts match with current pedagogical paradigms. The classroom is a high stakes environment for experimentation, thus new interaction techniques need to be validated to prove their pedagogical value in the educational setting. This workshop provides a forum to discuss key HCI issues facing next generation education. With a particular focus on child computer interaction, these issues comprise inter alia the interaction with whole class interactive whiteboards, small group interactive multi-touch tables, and individual personal response systems (e.g. mobile devices) in the classroom.

© All rights reserved Tse et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Böhmer, Matthias, Hecht, Brent, Schöning, Johannes, Krüger, Antonio and Bauer, Gernot (2011): Falling asleep with Angry Birds, Facebook and Kindle: a large scale study on mobile application usage. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 47-56.

While applications for mobile devices have become extremely important in the last few years, little public information exists on mobile application usage behavior. We describe a large-scale deployment-based research study that logged detailed application usage information from over 4,100 users of Android-powered mobile devices. We present two types of results from analyzing this data: basic descriptive statistics and contextual descriptive statistics. In the case of the former, we find that the average session with an application lasts less than a minute, even though users spend almost an hour a day using their phones. Our contextual findings include those related to time of day and location. For instance, we show that news applications are most popular in the morning and games are at night, but communication applications dominate through most of the day. We also find that despite the variety of apps available, communication applications are almost always the first used upon a device's waking from sleep. In addition, we discuss the notion of a virtual application sensor, which we used to collect the data.

© All rights reserved Böhmer et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Heinrichs, Felix, Schreiber, Daniel and Schöning, Johannes (2011): The hybrid shopping list: bridging the gap between physical and digital shopping lists. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 251-254.

Shopping is one of the most frequently occuring tasks in our daily lives, and creation and management of shopping lists is an important aspect of this task. Given the recent adoption of mobile devices, the process of writing lists is not only limited to the use of pen and paper, as a good number of digital tools and applications are available. The goal of this paper is to study and understand the transition between paper-based and digital shopping lists. We analyze how people interact with paper-based shopping lists and derive design implications for our own hybrid shopping support application, which combines paper-based lists with a mobile application. We contribute the study and the design and implementation of a hybrid (pen-and-paper-based UI and mobile GUI) application for the creation of shopping lists.

© All rights reserved Heinrichs et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Kalnikaité, Vaiva, Rogers, Yvonne, Bird, Jon, Villar, Nicolas, Bachour, Khaled, Payne, Stephen, Todd, Peter M., Schöning, Johannes, Krüger, Antonio and Kreitmayer, Stefan (2011): How to nudge in Situ: designing lambent devices to deliver salient information in supermarkets. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 11-20.

There are a number of mobile shopping aids and recommender systems available, but none can be easily used for a weekly shop at a local supermarket. We present a minimal, mobile and fully functional lambent display that clips onto any shopping trolley handle, intended to nudge people when choosing what to buy. It provides salient information about the food miles for various scanned food items represented by varying lengths of lit LEDs on the handle and a changing emoticon comparing the average miles of all the products in the trolley against a social norm. When evaluated in situ, the lambent handle display nudged people to choose products with fewer food miles than the items they selected using their ordinary shopping strategies. People also felt guilty when the average mileage of the contents of their entire shopping trolley was above the social norm. The findings are discussed in terms of how to provide different kinds of product information that people care about, using simple lambent displays.

© All rights reserved Kalnikaité et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
Edit | Del

Löchtefeld, Markus, Gehring, Sven, Schöning, Johannes and Krüger, Antonio (2010): PINwI: pedestrian indoor navigation without infrastructure. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 731-734.

Navigation in larger unfamiliar buildings like town halls, airports, shopping malls or other public indoor locations is often difficult for humans. Due to the high amount of infrastructure needed for indoor positioning, just a few navigation services for indoor environments exist. Therefore in many of these buildings 'YOU-ARE-HERE' (YAH) maps are provided, often located at the entrance or other key places, to facilitate orientation and navigation within the building, but they have the disadvantages of being stationary. In this paper, we try to overcome these problems by presenting PINwI (Pedestrian Indoor Navigation without Infrastructure), an application that allows the user of a mobile camera device with integrated compass and accelerometer to utilize a photo of such an indoor YAH-map to navigate through the corresponding building. Using a dead reckoning approach, we enrich stationary analog YAH-maps with basic location functionality and turn them into a digital and dynamic medium that can help decision making while taking turns or estimating distances.

© All rights reserved Löchtefeld et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Pfeiffer, Max, Kern, Dagmar, Schöning, Johannes, Döring, Tanja, Krüger, Antonio and Schmidt, Albrecht (2010): A multi-touch enabled steering wheel: exploring the design space. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3355-3360.

Cars offer an increasing number of infotainment systems as well as comfort functions that can be controlled by the driver. With our research we investigate new interaction techniques that aim to make it easier to interact with these systems while driving. In contrast to the standard approach of combining all functions into hierarchical menus controlled by a multifunctional controller or a touch screen we suggest to utilize the space on the steering wheel as additional interaction surface. In this paper we show the design challenges that arise for multi-touch interaction on a steering wheel. In particular we investigate how to deal with input and output while driving and hence rotating the wheel. We describe the details of a functional prototype of a multi-touch steering wheel that is based on FTIR and a projector, which was built to explore experimentally the user experience created. In an initial study with 12 participants we show that the approach has a general utility and that people can use gestures for controlling applications intuitively but have difficulties to imagine gestures to select applications.

© All rights reserved Pfeiffer et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Gehring, Sven, Löchtefeld, Markus, Schöning, Johannes, Gorecky, Dominic, Stephan, Peter, Krüger, Antonio and Rohs, Michael (2010): Mobile product customization. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3463-3468.

Many companies are using the web to enable customers to individually customize their products that range from automobiles and bicycles to CDs, cosmetics and shirts. In this paper we present a mobile application for product customization and production within a smart factory. This allows the ad hoc configuration of products at the point of sale (POS). We investigate human factors when customizing products while interacting with them. We focus on the concept of the mobile client that enables this ad hoc modification, but also present the production chain behind our product. We believe that this particular 3D interaction with a product and a mobile device help to improve the customer satisfaction as it allows for customizing a product in an easy and intuitive way. From a CHI perspective an important aspect is that our mobile augmented reality interface can help to match the costumer's expectations with the final modified product and allows the most natural and intuitive interaction. As a use case of the system, we present the modification of a soap dispenser.

© All rights reserved Gehring et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Tse, Edward, Schöning, Johannes, Rogers, Yvonne, Shen, Chia and Morrison, Gerald (2010): Next generation of HCI and education: workshop on UI technologies and educational pedagogy. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4509-4512.

Given the exponential growth of interactive whiteboards in classrooms around the world, and the recent emergence of multi-touch tables, tangible computing devices and mobile devices, there has been a need to explore how next generation HCI will impact education in the future. Educators are depending on the interaction communities to deliver technologies that will improve/adapt learning to an ever-changing world. In addition to novel UI concepts, the HCI community needs to examine how these concepts can be matched to contemporary paradigms in Educational pedagogy. The classroom is a challenging environment for evaluation, thus new interaction techniques need to be established to prove the value of new HCI interactions in the educational space. This workshop provides a forum to discuss key HCI issues facing next generation education ranging from whole class interactive whiteboards, small group interactive multi-touch tables, and individual personal response systems in the classroom.

© All rights reserved Tse et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Schöning, Johannes, Löchtefeld, Markus, Rohs, Michael and Krüger, Antonio (2010): Projector Phones: A New Class of Interfaces for Augmented Reality. In International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 2 (3) pp. 1-14.

With the miniaturization of projection technology, the integration of tiny projection units into mobile devices is no longer fiction; therefore, such integrated projectors in mobile devices could make mobile projection ubiquitous. These phones will have the ability to project large-scale information onto any surfaces in the real world, and by doing so, the interaction space of the mobile device can be considerably expanded. In addition, physical objects in the environment can be augmented with additional information, which can support interaction concepts that are not even possible on modern desktop computers today. The authors believe that mobile camera-projector units can form a promising interface type for mobile Augmented Reality (AR) applications, thus, this paper identifies different application classes of such interfaces. In addition, different spatial setups of camera and projector units will have an effect on the possible applications and the interaction space with the focus on the augmentation of real word objects in the environment. This paper presents two examples of applications for mobile camera-projector units and different hardware prototypes that allow augmentation of real world objects.

© All rights reserved Schöning et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Valkov, Dimitar, Steinicke, Frank, Bruder, Gerd, Hinrichs, Klaus, Schöning, Johannes, Daiber, Florian and Krüger, Antonio (2010): Touching Floating Objects in Projection-based Virtual Reality Environments. In: Kuhlen, Torsten, Coquillart, Sabine and Interrante, Victoria (eds.) Proceedings of the Joint Virtual Reality Conference of EGVE - EuroVR - VEC 2010, Stuttgart, Germany. pp. 17-24.

2009
 
Edit | Del

Schöning, Johannes, Bartindale, Tom, Olivier, Patrick, Jackson, Dan, Krüger, Antonio and Kitson, Jim (2009): iBookmark: locative texts and place-based authoring. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3775-3780.

With the recent developments in ePaper technology, consumer eBook readers have display qualities and form factors that are approaching that of traditional books. These eBook readers are already replacing paper in some commercial domains, but the potential of eBooks to extend forms of writing and storytelling has not been significantly explored. Using the digital and dynamic characteristics afforded by eBook readers, we are developing iBookmark, a GPS-enabled eBook reader. In iBookmark, writers can create stories that change in response to the location of the eBook itself. By setting context variables based on current and past locations of the eBook reader and using these in the rule-based generation of text and illustrations. We are developing new rhetorical device for writers that extend the expressive range of eBook delivered stories.

© All rights reserved Schöning et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Schöning, Johannes, Rohs, Michael, Kratz, Sven, Löchtefeld, Markus and Krüger, Antonio (2009): Map torchlight: a mobile augmented reality camera projector unit. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3841-3846.

The advantages of paper-based maps have been utilized in the field of mobile Augmented Reality (AR) in the last few years. Traditional paper-based maps provide high-resolution, large-scale information with zero power consumption. There are numerous implementations of magic lens interfaces that combine high-resolution paper maps with dynamic handheld displays. From an HCI perspective, the main challenge of magic lens interfaces is that users have to switch their attention between the magic lens and the information in the background. In this paper, we attempt to overcome this problem by using a lightweight mobile camera projector unit to augment the paper map directly with additional information. The "Map Torchlight" is tracked over a paper map and can precisely highlight points of interest, streets, and areas to give directions or other guidance for interacting with the map.

© All rights reserved Schöning et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Schöning, Johannes, Daiber, Florian, Krüger, Antonio and Rohs, Michael (2009): Using hands and feet to navigate and manipulate spatial data. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4663-4668.

We demonstrate how multi-touch hand gestures in combination with foot gestures can be used to perform navigation tasks in interactive systems. The geospatial domain is an interesting example to show the advantages of the combination of both modalities because the complex user interfaces of common Geographic Information System (GIS) requires a high degree of expertise from its users. Recent developments in interactive surfaces that enable the construction of low cost multi-touch displays and relatively cheap sensor technology to detect foot gestures allow the deep exploration of these input modalities for GIS users with medium or low expertise. In this paper, we provide a categorization of multitouch hand and foot gestures for the interaction with spatial data on a large-scale interactive wall. In addition we show with an initial evaluation how these gestures can improve the overall interaction with spatial information.

© All rights reserved Schöning et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Wilde, Erik, Boll, Susanne, Cheverst, Keith, Fröhlich, Peter, Purves, Ross and Schöning, Johannes (2009): Location and the web: (LocWeb 2009). In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4737-4740.

Location-based services are becoming increasingly Web-based, as a result of the availability of networked mobile devices and mobile Internet access. The "Location and the Web (LocWeb)" workshop targets the capabilities and constraints of Web-based location-based services, which can be implemented as browser-based applications, or as native applications using Web services. The focus of this CHI workshop is on approaches which handle the complexity of location-based services, specifically looking at location abstractions, location sharing, context-relevant information, privacy issues, and interface and interaction design. The goal of this workshop is to serve as a starting point for attaining a better understanding of how the Web has to change in order to embrace location as a first-level concept, and how these changes might be reflected in applications and user interfaces that transform the Web into a platform for location-based services.

© All rights reserved Wilde et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Schöning, Johannes, Krüger, Antonio, Cheverst, Keith, Rohs, Michael, Löchtefeld, Markus and Taher, Faisal (2009): PhotoMap: using spontaneously taken images of public maps for pedestrian navigation tasks on mobile devices. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 14.

In many mid- to large-sized cities public maps are ubiquitous. One can also find a great number of maps in parks or near hiking trails. Public maps help to facilitate orientation and provide special information to not only tourists but also to locals who just want to look up an unfamiliar place while on the go. These maps offer many advantages compared to mobile maps from services like Google Maps Mobile or Nokia Maps. They often show local landmarks and sights that are not shown on standard digital maps. Often these 'You are here' (YAH) maps are adapted to a special use case, e.g. a zoo map or a hiking map of a certain area. Being designed for a fashioned purpose these maps are often aesthetically well designed and their usage is therefore more pleasant. In this paper we present a novel technique and application called PhotoMap that uses images of 'You are here' maps taken with a GPS-enhanced mobile camera phone as background maps for on-the-fly navigation tasks. We discuss different implementations of the main challenge, namely helping the user to properly georeference the taken image with sufficient accuracy to support pedestrian navigation tasks. We present a study that discusses the suitability of various public maps for this task and we evaluate if these georeferenced photos can be used for navigation on GPS-enabled devices.

© All rights reserved Schöning et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Rohs, Michael, Essl, Georg, Schöning, Johannes, Naumann, Anja, Schleicher, Robert and Krüger, Antonio (2009): Impact of item density on magic lens interactions. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 38.

We conducted a user study to investigate the effect of visual context in handheld augmented reality interfaces. A dynamic peephole interface (without visual context beyond the device display) was compared to a magic lens interface (with video see-through augmentation of external visual context). The task was to explore objects on a map and look for a specific attribute shown on the display. We tested different sizes of visual context as well as different numbers of items per area, i.e. different item densities. We found that visual context is most effective for sparse item distributions and the performance benefit decreases with increasing density. User performance in the magic lens case approaches the performance of the dynamic peephole case the more densely spaced the items are. In all conditions, subjective feedback indicates that participants generally prefer visual context over the lack thereof. The insights gained from this study are relevant for designers of mobile AR and dynamic peephole interfaces by suggesting when external visual context is most beneficial.

© All rights reserved Rohs et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Proß, Benjamin, Schöning, Johannes and Krüger, Antonio (2009): iPiccer: automatically retrieving and inferring tagged location information from web repositories. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 69.

We present iPiccer, a system that allows mobile camera phones users to interact with meta-tagged image material available from web repositories, such as flickr in two novel ways. Users of the system are able to infer photo tags from their location and orientation, but are also able to infer their location and orientation from their spatial photo tags. An implementation of iPiccerTaker is outlined, and the potential of this new form of interaction with web repository data is discussed.

© All rights reserved Proß et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
Edit | Del

Schöning, Johannes, Hecht, Brent and Starosielski, Nicole (2008): Evaluating automatically generated location-based stories for tourists. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2937-2942.

Tourism provides over six percent of the world's gross domestic product. As a result, there have been many efforts to use technology to improve the tourist's experience via mobile tour guide systems. One key bottleneck in such location-based systems is content development; existing systems either provide trivial information at a global scale or present quality narratives but at an extremely local scale. The primary reason for this dichotomy is that, although good narrative content is more educationally effective (and more entertaining) than a stream of simple, disconnected facts, it is time-intensive and expensive to develop. However, the WikEar system uses narrative theory-informed data mining methodologies in an effort to produce high-quality narrative content for any location on Earth. It allows tourists to interact with these narratives using their camera-enabled cell phones and an innovative interface designed around a magic lens and paper map metaphor. In this paper, we describe a first evaluation of these narratives and the WikEar interface, which reported promising, but not conclusive, results. We also present ideas for future work that will use this feedback to improve the narratives.

© All rights reserved Schöning et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Schöning, Johannes, Hecht, Brent, Raubal, Martin, Krüger, Antonio, Marsh, Meredith and Rohs, Michael (2008): Improving interaction with virtual globes through spatial thinking: helping users ask "why?. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2008. pp. 129-138.

Virtual globes have progressed from little-known technology to broadly popular software in a mere few years. We investigated this phenomenon through a survey and discovered that, while virtual globes are en vogue, their use is restricted to a small set of tasks so simple that they do not involve any spatial thinking. Spatial thinking requires that users ask "what is where" and "why"; the most common virtual globe tasks only include the "what". Based on the results of this survey, we have developed a multi-touch virtual globe derived from an adapted virtual globe paradigm designed to widen the potential uses of the technology by helping its users to inquire about both the "what is where" and "why" of spatial distribution. We do not seek to provide users with full GIS (geographic information system) functionality, but rather we aim to facilitate the asking and answering of simple "why" questions about general topics that appeal to a wide virtual globe user base.

© All rights reserved Schöning et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Schöning, Johannes, Rohs, Michael and Krüger, Antonio (2008): Mobile Interaction with the real world. In: Henze, Niels, Broll, Gregor, Rukzio, Enrico, Rohs, Michael, Zimmermann, Andreas and Boll, Susanne (eds.) Mobile Interaction with the Real World 2008 - MIRW 2008 - Mobile HCI Workshop September 2, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherland. pp. 51-60.

 
Edit | Del

Cheverst, Keith, Schöning, Johannes, Krüger, Antonio and Rohs, Michael (2008): Photomap: Snap, Grab and Walk away with a "You Are Here" Map. In: Henze, Niels, Broll, Gregor, Rukzio, Enrico, Rohs, Michael, Zimmermann, Andreas and Boll, Susanne (eds.) Mobile Interaction with the Real World 2008 - MIRW 2008 - Mobile HCI Workshop September 2, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherland. pp. 73-82.

 
Edit | Del

Gliet, Jana, Krüger, Antonio, Klemm, Otto and Schöning, Johannes (2008): Image geo-mashups: the example of an augmented reality weather camera. In: Levialdi, Stefano (ed.) AVI 2008 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces May 28-30, 2008, Napoli, Italy. pp. 287-294.

2007
 
Edit | Del

Rohs, Michael, Schöning, Johannes, Raubal, Martin, Essl, Georg and Krüger, Antonio (2007): Map navigation with mobile devices: virtual versus physical movement with and without visual context. In: Massaro, Dominic W., Takeda, Kazuya, Roy, Deb and Potamianos, Alexandros (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2007 November 12-15, 2007, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. pp. 146-153.

 
Edit | Del

Rohs, Michael, Schöning, Johannes, Raubal, Martin, Essl, Georg and Krüger, Antonio (2007): Map navigation with mobile devices: virtual versus physical movement with and without visual context. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2007. pp. 146-153.

A user study was conducted to compare the performance of three methods for map navigation with mobile devices. These methods are joystick navigation, the dynamic peephole method without visual context, and the magic lens paradigm using external visual context. The joystick method is the familiar scrolling and panning of a virtual map keeping the device itself static. In the dynamic peephole method the device is moved and the map is fixed with respect to an external frame of reference, but no visual information is present outside the device's display. The magic lens method augments an external content with graphical overlays, hence providing visual context outside the device display. Here too motion of the device serves to steer navigation. We compare these methods in a study measuring user performance, motion patterns, and subjective preference via questionnaires. The study demonstrates the advantage of dynamic peephole and magic lens interaction over joystick interaction in terms of search time and degree of exploration of the search space.

© All rights reserved Rohs et al. and/or their publisher

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Changes to this page (author)

23 Nov 2012: Modified
23 Nov 2012: Modified
05 Apr 2012: Modified
04 Apr 2012: Modified
04 Apr 2012: Modified
06 Jul 2011: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
20 Apr 2011: Modified
16 Jan 2011: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
17 Jun 2009: Modified
30 May 2009: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
08 Apr 2009: Modified
12 May 2008: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/johannes_sch%F6ning.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2007-2012
Pub. count:29
Number of co-authors:71



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Antonio Krüger:19
Michael Rohs:11
Brent Hecht:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Johannes Schöning's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Karin Coninx:134
Albrecht Schmidt:110
Yvonne Rogers:99
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
go to course
The Psychology of Online Sales: The Beginner's Guide
Starts the day after tomorrow !
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading