Publication statistics

Pub. period:1987-2014
Pub. count:46
Number of co-authors:66



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Yvonne Rogers:6
Blair Nonnecke:5
Helen Sharp:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jennifer J. Preece's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Yvonne Rogers:99
Allison Druin:81
Starr Roxanne Hilt..:69
 
 
 

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Jennifer J. Preece

Picture of Jennifer J. Preece.
Update pic
Has also published under the name of:
"Jenny Preece", "J. J. Preece", "J. Preece", and "J. Preece"

Personal Homepage:
ischool.umd.edu/faculty-staff/jennifer-j-preece


Jennifer J. Preece is Dean of the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland. She researches online communities and is known for her work on what makes such a community successful, and how usability factors interact with socialibility in online communities. Preece gained her Ph.D. at the Open University, later becoming faculty there. She went on to be a Research Professor of Information Systems and Director of the Research Center for People and Systems Interaction at London South Bank University in London.

 

Publications by Jennifer J. Preece (bibliography)

 what's this?
2014

Preece, Jennifer J. (2014). Commentary on 'Contextual Design' by Karen Holtzblatt and Hugh R. Beyer

2008
 
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Wu, Philip Fei, Qu, Yan and Preece, Jennifer J. (2008): Why an Emergency Alert System isn't Adopted: The Impact of Socio-Technical Context. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 101-104. Available online

The purpose of this study is to understand the laggard adoption of an SMS-based emergency alert system on a university campus. Based on findings from in-depth interviews and a focus group, we discuss some critical issues in designing and implementing such alert systems, with a focus on the sociocultural factors that de-motivate people to use them. Our findings show that, even for a system with simple technology, the adoption process involves complex interactions between individual perceptions and the social context in which the system is situated.

© All rights reserved Wu et al. and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Sharp, Helen, Rogers, Yvonne and Preece, Jennifer J. (2007): Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction. John Wiley and Sons

 Cited in the following chapters:

Interaction Design - brief intro: [/encyclopedia/interaction_design.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapters:

Interaction Design - brief intro: [/encyclopedia/interaction_design.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Komlodi, Anita, Hou, Weimin, Preece, Jennifer J., Druin, Allison, Golub, Evan, Alburo, Jade, Liao, Sabrina, Elkiss, Aaron and Resnik, Philip (2007): Evaluating a cross-cultural children's online book community: Lessons learned for sociability, usability, and cultural exchange. In Interacting with Computers, 19 (4) pp. 494-511. Available online

The use of computers for human-to-human communication among adults has been studied for many years, but using computer technology to enable children from all over the world to talk to each other has rarely been discussed by researchers. The goal of our research is to fill this gap and explore the design and evaluation of children's cross-language online communities via a case study of the International Children's Digital Library Communities (ICDLCommunities). This project supports the development of communities for children (ages 7-11) that form around the International Digital Children's Library (ICDL) book collection. In this community the children can learn about each others' cultures and make friends even if they do not speak the same language. They can also read and create stories and ask and answer questions about these. From this evaluation study we learned that: (i) children are very interested in their counterparts in other countries and a remarkable amount of communication takes place even when they do not share a common language; (ii) representing their identity online in many different forms is particularly important to children when communicating in an online community; (iii) children enjoy drawing but representing stories in a sequence of diagrams is challenging and needs support; and (iv) asking and answering questions without language is possible using graphical templates. In this paper we present our findings and make recommendations for designing children's cross-cultural online communities.

© All rights reserved Komlodi et al. and/or Elsevier Science

2006
 
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Schoberth, Thomas, Heinzl, Armin and Preece, Jennifer J. (2006): Exploring Communication Activities in Online Communities: A Longitudinal Analysis in the Financial Services Industry. In Journal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerce, 16 (3) pp. 247-265.

Online communities (OCs) are seen as important stimulus to electronic business. However, surprisingly little is known about how the communication activity of their participants develops and changes over time. A longitudinal study bears the potential to better elaborate the enabling and inhibiting factors of the participant's communication activity in OCs. To explore these phenomena, we aimed to develop a conceptual framework that serves as a foundation to guide an explorative data analysis of real OCs. We use the notions of common ground, information overload, interactivity, and social loafing to explain the communication activity of the participants in OCs. The empirically explored framework will help organizations to support the development of OCs and utilize them in an economically successful way. Based on a literature review, we developed a first conceptual framework. Then, we apply it to describe the development of the communication activity and its determinants in an OC hosted by a German financial service provider. In this study, we examined over 33,000 participants and 1.03 million messages over a period of 3 years. We found a strong effect of external factors on the size of this OC. The size of the OC showed no direct influence on the communication activity of the participants. However, in reaction to the increasing information load, communication strategies changed and herewith influenced the communication activity. The heterogeneity of the participant's activity was growing over time, and a small minority of participants wrote more and more of the postings.

© All rights reserved Schoberth et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

2004
 
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Feng, Jinjuan, Lazar, Jonathan and Preece, Jennifer J. (2004): Empathy and online interpersonal trust: A fragile relationship. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 23 (2) pp. 97-106. Available online

The rapid growth of personal email communication, instant messaging and online communities has brought attention to the important role of interpersonal trust in online communication. An empirical study was conducted focusing on the effect of empathy on online interpersonal trust in textual IM. To be more specific, the relationship between empathic accuracy, response type and online interpersonal trust was investigated. The result suggests both empathic accuracy and response type have significant influence on online interpersonal trust. The interaction between empathic accuracy and response type also significantly influences online trust. Interestingly, the results imply a relationship between daily trust attitude and online interpersonal trust. People who are more trusting in their daily life may experience more difficulty in developing trust online. There is also some evidence to suggest that different communication scenarios may have an influence on online trust.

© All rights reserved Feng et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Zhang, Ping, Nah, Fiona Fui-Hoon and Preece, Jennifer J. (2004): Guest Editorial: HCI studies in management information systems. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 23 (3) pp. 147-151. Available online

 
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de Souza, Clarisse Sieckenius and Preece, Jennifer J. (2004): A framework for analyzing and understanding online communities. In Interacting with Computers, 16 (3) pp. 579-610. Available online

Social interactions in online communities are varied and often complex, as are the communities themselves. The characteristics of the people, the range of purposes they pursue, the type of governance policies they develop, and the design of the software supporting a community, vary from community to community. These characteristics determine a community's sociability. Thus, the availability of powerful analytic tools to help designers understand existing technology-supported social activity online can broaden the spectrum of design knowledge and promote new insights for designing computer applications of this sort. In this paper, we present one such analytic tool -- a theoretically-based online community framework (OCF). In order to demonstrate the efficacy of the framework we elaborate on its communication constituent using semiotic theory to help us. This constituent is particularly important in the OCF because it addresses computer-mediated communication between community members, and also communication from interactive software designers to users via the software they design. This latter kind of communication can shape the community's experience to a considerable extent, as our analysis shows. The paper ends with an agenda for future research.

© All rights reserved de Souza and Preece and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Nonnecke, Blair, Preece, Jennifer J. and Andrews, Dorine (2004): What Lurkers and Posters Think of Each Other. In: HICSS 2004 2004. . Available online

 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Schubert, Petra and Tan, Yao-Hua (2004): Online Communities in the Digital Economy: Minitrack Introduction. In: HICSS 2004 2004. . Available online

2003
 
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Preece, Jennifer J. and Abras, C. (2003): The Challenges of Teaching HCI Online: It's Mostly About Creating Community. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction June 22-27, 2003, Crete, Greece. pp. 391-395.

 
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Abras, C., Maloney-Krichmar, D. and Preece, Jennifer J. (2003): Evaluating an Online Academic Community: 'Purpose' is the Key. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction June 22-27, 2003, Crete, Greece. pp. 829-833.

 
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Andrews, Dorine, Nonnecke, Blair and Preece, Jennifer J. (2003): Electronic Survey Methodology: A Case Study in Reaching Hard-to-Involve Internet Users. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 16 (2) pp. 185-210. Available online

Using the Internet to conduct quantitative research presents challenges not found in conventional research. Paper-based survey quality criteria cannot be completely adapted to electronic formats. Electronic surveys have distinctive technological, demographic, and response characteristics that affect their design, use, and implementation. Survey design, participant privacy and confidentiality, sampling and subject solicitation, distribution methods and response rates, and survey piloting are critical methodological components that must be addressed. In this article, quality criteria for electronic survey design and use based on an investigation of recent electronic survey literature are presented. The application of these criteria to reach a hard-to-involve online population-nonpublic participants of online communities (also known as "lurkers")-and survey them on their community participation, a topic not salient to the purpose of their online communities is demonstrated in a case study. The results show that a hard-to-reach audience can be reached using the quality criteria that are most important for reaching these types of audiences. The results suggest how the use of some criteria may conflict and what researchers may experience when conducting electronic surveys in an online culture in which people are not tolerant of intrusions into online lives.

© All rights reserved Andrews et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Schoberth, Thomas, Preece, Jennifer J. and Heinzl, Armin (2003): Online Communities: A Longitudinal Analysis of Communication Activities. In: HICSS 2003 2003. p. 216. Available online

2002
 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Rogers, Yvonne and Sharp, Helen (2002): Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction. John Wiley and Sons

 Cited in the following chapters:

Tradition and transcendence: [/encyclopedia/tradition_and_transcendence.html]

Agile Usability Engineering: [/encyclopedia/agile_usability_engineering.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapters:

Tradition and transcendence: [/encyclopedia/tradition_and_transcendence.html]

Agile Usability Engineering: [/encyclopedia/agile_usability_engineering.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Bieber, Michael, Im, Il, Rice, Ronald E., Goldman-Segall, Ricki, Paul, Ravi, Stohr, Edward A., Hiltz, Starr Roxanne, Preece, Jennifer J. and Turoff, Murray (2002): Towards Knowledge-Sharing and Learning in Virtual Professional Communities. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 213. Available online

2001
 
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Preece, Jennifer J. (2001): Sociability and usability in online communities: determining and measuring success. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 20 (5) pp. 347-356.

Little attention has focused so far on evaluating the success of online communities. This paper begins to identify some key determinants of sociability and usability that help to determine their success. Determinants of sociability include obvious measures such as the number of participants in a community, the number of messages per unit of time, members' satisfaction, and some less obvious measures such as amount of reciprocity, the number of on-topic messages, trustworthiness and several others. Measures of usability include numbers of errors, productivity, user satisfaction and others. The list is not exhaustive but it is intended to provide a starting point for research on this important topic that will lead to develop of metrics. To avoid creating false impressions it is advisable to use several measures and to triangulate with qualitative data, particularly from ethnographic studies.

© All rights reserved Preece and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Preece, Jennifer J. (2001): Designing Usability, Supporting Sociability: Questions Participants Ask about Online Communities. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT01: Human-Computer Interaction 2001, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 3-12.

 
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Andrews, Dorine, Preece, Jennifer J. and Turoff, Murray (2001): A Conceptual Framework for Demographic Groups Resistant to Online Community Interaction. In: HICSS 2001 2001. . Available online

 
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Bieber, Michael, Hiltz, Starr Roxanne, Stohr, Edward A., Engelbart, Douglas C., Noll, John, Turoff, Murray, Furuta, Richard, Preece, Jennifer J. and Walle, Bartel Van de (2001): Virtual Community Knowledge Evolution. In: HICSS 2001 2001. . Available online

2000
 
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Nonnecke, Blair and Preece, Jennifer J. (2000): Lurker Demographics: Counting the Silent. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 73-80. Available online

As online groups grow in number and type, understanding lurking is becoming increasingly important. Recent reports indicate that lurkers make up over 90% of online groups, yet little is known about them. This paper presents a demographic study of lurking in email-based discussion lists (DLs) with an emphasis on health and software-support DLs. Four primary questions are examined. One, how prevalent is lurking, and do health and software-support DLs differ? Two, how do lurking levels vary as the definition is broadened from zero posts in 12 weeks to 3 or fewer posts in 12 weeks? Three, is there a relationship between lurking and the size of the DL, and four, is there a relationship between lurking and traffic level? When lurking is defined as no posts, the mean lurking level for all DLs is lower than the reported 90%.

© All rights reserved Nonnecke and Preece and/or ACM Press

 
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Preece, Jennifer J. (2000): Online Communities: Designing Usability and Supporting Sociability. John Wiley and Sons

 
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Nonnecke, Blair and Preece, Jennifer J. (2000): Persistence and Lurkers in Discussion Lists: A Pilot Study. In: HICSS 2000 2000. . Available online

1999
 
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Oostendorp, Herre van, Preece, Jennifer J. and Arnold, Albert G. (1999): Designing Multimedia for Human Needs and Capabilities. In Interacting with Computers, 12 (1) pp. 1-5.

The central tenet of HCI is to ensure that software and hardware design supports users doing their tasks. Most of the papers in this Special Issue go one step beyond designing for usability -- they also address design issues related to supporting human values. As computer usage becomes more diverse both in terms of the range of users and types of applications, human values such as democracy will become increasingly important and controversial, especially, as the number of people coming onto the Internet increases. For example, the issue of computer haves and have nots is well known, but governments are only just starting to think through its implications in terms of future policy. In addition, understanding users' affective responses to systems and how emotions are conveyed across networks is starting to gain designers' attention. Brenda Laurel's company, Purple Moon, is a clear example of the perceived need of designing to support users' emotional needs, in this case, teenage girls.

© All rights reserved Oostendorp et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Preece, Jennifer J. (1999): Empathic Communities: Balancing Emotional and Factual Communication. In Interacting with Computers, 12 (1) pp. 63-77.

The Web empowers a diverse population of users and this is reflected in both the demography and interests of today's on-line communities. Many of these communities provide an essential social function by enabling people with medical or personal problems to discuss their concerns with others. Physicians can provide the facts, but other patients can tell you what it really feels like and what to expect next, in a way that only someone with personal experience can. A study of the messages from an on-line medical support group shows that empathy is an essential ingredient in participants' discussions. Better tools are needed to empower patients to help themselves by finding information and contacting other patients in bulletin board communities. Suggestions about the nature of these tools are discussed. In particular, supporting a balance between empathic and factual communication is stressed.

© All rights reserved Preece and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Squires, David and Preece, Jennifer J. (1999): Predicting Quality in Educational Software: Evaluating For Learning, Usability and the Synergy between Them. In Interacting with Computers, 11 (5) pp. 467-483.

Teachers need to be able to evaluate predictively educational software so that they can make decisions about what software to purchase and how to use software in classrooms. The conventional approach to predictive evaluation is to use a checklist. We argue that checklists are seriously flawed in principle because they do not encompass a consideration of learning issues. More particularly they fail to adopt a socio-constructivist view of learning. We propose an approach that adapts the idea of usability heuristics by taking account of a socio-constructivist learning perspective. This leads to a set of 'learning with software' heuristics. A notable feature of these heuristics is that they attend to the integration of usability and learning issues.

© All rights reserved Squires and Preece and/or Elsevier Science

1998
 
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Preece, Jennifer J. (1998): Empathic Communities: Reaching Out Across the Web. In Interactions, 5 (2) pp. 32-43. Available online

 
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Ramsay, Judith, Barbesi, Alessandro and Preece, Jennifer J. (1998): A Psychological Investigation of Long Retrieval Times on the World Wide Web. In Interacting with Computers, 10 (1) pp. 77-86. Available online

With the increasingly rapid uptake of the World Wide Web, even those pages classed as 'the best of the web' are not immune to large download latencies. This paper investigates whether the latency between requesting a page and receiving it influence user perceptions of the page. The paper describes a study in which users are presented with seven different web pages with delays ranging from 2 s to 2 min, and are then asked to rate the pages on a number of criteria. Predetermined delays were injected into the page loading process. Pages which were retrieved faster were judged significantly more interesting than their slower counterparts. The implications for web page design are discussed.

© All rights reserved Ramsay et al. and/or Elsevier Science

1997
 
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Neal, Lisa Rubin, Ramsay, Judith and Preece, Jennifer J. (1997): Distance Learning: A CHI 97 Special Interest Group. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (4) pp. 76-78. Available online

1996
 
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Ramsay, Judith, Barabesi, Alessandro and Preece, Jennifer J. (1996): Informal Communication is about Sharing Objects in Media. In Interacting with Computers, 8 (3) pp. 277-283.

The paper focuses upon informal communication over desktop video-conferencing software. Evidence is presented in support of video providing some form of shared perspective (otherwise known as the 'video-as-data' hypothesis) and questions are raised about users' media-coupling activities in an informal context. It is anticipated that further insight has been gained into the nature of informal mediated communication, and consequently the requirements of supporting technologies.

© All rights reserved Ramsay et al. and/or Elsevier Science

1995
 
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Nonnecke, Blair, Jacques, Richard, Mckerlie, Diana and Preece, Jennifer J. (1995): Video-based hypermedia: guiding design with users' questions. In New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, 1 pp. 185-197.

Users' questions can provide important design input. In this paper we examine the questions that users asked after viewing a series of seven video clips and then classify them into three main categories: questions relating to perception difficulties; questions concerning lack of understanding due to some form of dissonance and questions requiring more content information. There are three benefits from analyzing these questions, which will enable designers to improve their designs. First, our approach provides a breakdown of the questions that users ask which can be used by designers to determine what kind of additional information should be made available. Second, it provides a user-centered way of determining where to make links. Third, it enables designers to detect usability and pedagogic problems early in the design of video-based hypermedia.

© All rights reserved Nonnecke et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

1994
 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Rogers, Yvonne, Sharp, Helen and Benyon, David (1994): Human-Computer Interaction. Essex, UK, Addison-Wesley Publishing

 Cited in the following chapter:

Interaction Styles: [/encyclopedia/interaction_styles.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Interaction Styles: [/encyclopedia/interaction_styles.html]


 
 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Rogers, Yvonne, Sharp, Helen, Benyon, David, Holland, Simon and Carey, Tom (1994): Human-Computer Interaction. Reading, Mass., Addison-Wesley Publishing

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Preece, Jennifer J. and Rombach, H. Dieter (1994): A Taxonomy for Combining Software Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction Measurement Approaches: Towards a Common Framework. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 41 (4) pp. 553-583.

The rapid development of any field of knowledge brings with it unavoidable fragmentation and proliferation of new disciplines. The development of computer science is no exception. Software engineering (SE) and human-computer interaction (HCI) are both relatively new disciplines of computer science. Furthermore, as both names suggest, they each have strong connections with other subjects. SE is concerned with methods and tools for general software development based on engineering principles. This discipline has its roots not only in computer science but also in a number of traditional engineering disciplines. HCI is concerned with methods and tools for the development of human-computer interfaces, assessing the usability of computer systems and with broader issues about how people interact with computers. It is based on theories about how humans process information and interact with computers, other objects and other people in the organizational and social contexts in which computers are used. HCI draws on knowledge and skills from psychology, anthropology and sociology in addition to computer science. Both disciplines need ways of measuring how well their products and development processes fulfil their intended requirements. Traditionally, SE has been concerned with "how software is constructed" and HCI with "how people use software". Given the different histories of the disciplines and their different objectives, it is not surprising that they take different approaches to measurement. Thus, each has its own distinct "measurement culture". In this paper we analyse the differences and the commonalities of the two cultures by examining the measurement approaches used by each. We then argue the need for a common measurement taxonomy and framework, which is derived from our analyses of the two disciplines. Next we demonstrate the usefulness of the taxonomy and framework via specific example studies drawn from our own work and that of others and show that, in fact, the two disciplines have many important similarities as well as differences and that there is some evidence to suggest that they are growing closer. Finally, we discuss the role of the taxonomy as a framework to support: reuse, planning future studies, guiding practice and facilitating communication between the two disciplines.

© All rights reserved Preece and and/or Academic Press

 
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Gasen, Jean B., Preece, Jennifer J., Gorny, Peter and Hewett, Tom (1994): Education: Advances in Teaching the HCI Design Process. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (1) pp. 9-12.

 
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Preece, Jennifer J. (1994): "Developing User Interfaces: Ensuring Usability Through Product and Process,. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (1) pp. 74-77.

 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Rogers, Yvonne, Sharp, Helen, Benyon, David, Holland, Simon and Carey, Tom (1994): Human-Computer Interaction. Reading, Mass., Addison-Wesley Publishing

1993
 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Benyon, David, Davies, Gordon, Keller, Laurie and Rogers, Yvonne (eds.) (1993): A Guide to Usability: Human Factors in Computing. Wokingham, England, Addison-Wesley Publishing

1992
 
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McKerlie, Diane and Preece, Jennifer J. (1992): The Hypermedia Effect: More Than Just the Sum of Its Parts. In: East-West International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Proceedings of the EWHCI92 1992. pp. 115-127.

Many claims and much "hype" surround the term "hypermedia". Foremost amongst these claims are that hypermedia will revolutionize learning and users' abilities to interact with, search for, and tailor information to suit their own needs. These claims are similar to those made about "hypertext" in the past. In this paper we offer definitions for the terms "multimedia" and "hypermedia" and examine some of the above claims using examples from a collaborative research and development project at the Open University and Rank Xerox EuroPARC. Our point of view is that, whilst there is certainly considerable "hype", nevertheless hypermedia is indeed different. It is "more than just the sum (i.e. the overall effect) of the parts" (e.g. sound, video, graphics, text etc.). Further research and creative exploration are needed to understand how best to harness the potential of combining multiple media into well designed hypermedia systems.

© All rights reserved McKerlie and Preece and/or Intl. Centre for Scientific And Technical Information

1991
 
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Preece, Jennifer J. and Keller, Laurie S. (1991): Teaching the Practitioners: Developing a Distance Learning Postgraduate HCI Course. In Interacting with Computers, 3 (1) pp. 92-118.

This paper reports on HCI education and on issues in HCI needing resolution when developing a course in human-computer interaction. We also look at how HCI can be taught, particularly to professional engineers, scientists and managers, using distance teaching and predicated on students using their industrial base as a classroom and laboratory. The paper also draws a comparison between the practices of user-centred iterative software design and the way that our course was developed.

© All rights reserved Preece and and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Mantei, Marilyn, Hewett, Thomas T., Eason, Ken and Preece, Jennifer J. (1991): Report on the INTERACT'90 Workshop on Education in HCI: Transcending Disciplinary and National Boundaries. In Interacting with Computers, 3 (2) pp. 232-240.

1990
 
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Preece, Jennifer J. and Keller, Laurie S. (1990): Why, What and How? Issues in the Development of an HCI Training Course. In: Diaper, Dan, Gilmore, David J., Cockton, Gilbert and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 90 - 3rd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 27-31, 1990, Cambridge, UK. pp. 3-7.

Lack of tradition in teaching HCI and the multi-disciplinary nature of the subject creates challenging problems for those developing a curriculum to teach it. In this paper we discuss the development of a postgraduate course for practicing professionals in industry and commerce. The course is taught by distance teaching, which means that students study texts integrated with other media on their own. Three questions are considered: why we teach HCI, what we teach and how we teach. In addition, we discuss how problems arising from the multi-disciplinary nature of HCI pervaded course development and how the development process itself resembled user-centred HCI design practices.

© All rights reserved Preece and and/or North-Holland

 
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Crellin, Jonathan, Horn, Thomas and Preece, Jennifer J. (1990): Evaluating Evaluation: A Case Study of the Use of Novel and Conventional Evaluation Techniques in a Small Company. In: Diaper, Dan, Gilmore, David J., Cockton, Gilbert and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 90 - 3rd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 27-31, 1990, Cambridge, UK. pp. 329-335.

During recent co-operative working with an industrial partner, a number of usability evaluation techniques were compared in an evaluation of seven interface prototypes. A detailed real-time software log of the interaction was recorded and video and audio records of the interactions were kept. Additionally, a novel experience elicitation technique, based on knowledge elicitation techniques was used. Keystroke and BNF analyses were also prepared. This material has allowed a comparison of the different methods to be made, and recommendations as to their use to be drawn up.

© All rights reserved Crellin et al. and/or North-Holland

 
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Preece, Jennifer J. and Keller, Laurie (1990): Key Issues in HCI Curriculum Design. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 22 (1) pp. 67-69.

This paper reports on key issues that needed to be resolved in developing a large postgraduate distance education course in human-computer interaction intended for practicing software developers and technical managers. The multi-disciplinary nature of HCI is identified as being highly controversial when deciding what to teach and how. Questions about the balance of theory versus practice and providing tools versus knowledge are also considered major issues. A less general set of issues including questions such as what is design are also considered. Here, many of the sources of controversy can be traced to higher level issues, in particular the multi-disciplinary nature of HCI.

© All rights reserved Preece and Keller and/or ACM Press

 
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Preece, Jennifer J. and Keller, Laurie (eds.) (1990): Human-Computer Interaction. Cambridge, England, Prentice Hall

1987
 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Woodman, M., Ince, D. C., Griffiths, R. and Davies, G. (1987): Toward a Structured Approach to Specifying User Interface Design. In: Bullinger, Hans-Jorg and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 87 - 2nd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction September 1-4, 1987, Stuttgart, Germany. pp. 415-421.

Given the complexity of interface design it is hardly surprising that there are few published accounts of complete interface design methodologies. This paper describes how decisions from empirically collected data can be embedded in an overall decision-making framework.

© All rights reserved Preece et al. and/or North-Holland

 
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